Page 7 of 22 FirstFirst ... 4567891017 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 324

Thread: Humanity Stands at Standing Rock

  1. #91
    Retired Member United States
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    1,264
    Thanks
    1,691
    Thanked 7,654 Times in 1,264 Posts
    CANNON BALL, N.D. — The crowdsourcing goal was modest: $5,000, enough to help a few dozen people camping in North Dakota to protest the nearby construction of the four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline. The fund has since topped a staggering $1 million.

    The fund is among several cash streams that have provided at least $3 million to help with legal costs, food and other supplies to those opposing the nearly 1,200-mile pipeline. It may also give protesters the ability to prolong their months-long encampments that have attracted thousands of supporters, as the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe pursues the fight in court.


    And as the number of protest-related arrests increased this week, so did contributions — the funds raked in more than $200,000 between Thursday and Friday alone.

    But demonstrators are quick to note that the amount of money raised and what they have left isn’t the same.

    “It still feels unreal sometimes because it is such an astronomical figure to me,” said Ho Waste Wakiya Wicasa, the protester who set up the GoFundMe account that has raised more than $1 million mostly for operating expenses at the camp, which took root in April.

    “The money goes as quickly as it comes, but without it having been as much as it is, we certainly wouldn’t have been able to be as productive as we have been in the fight,” he said.

    For months now, opponents of the $3.8 billion pipeline — which is slated to move oil from North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois — have been camping near the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball rivers. They worry the project will disrupt cultural artifacts and hurt drinking water sources on the Standing Rock Sioux’s nearby reservation and farther downstream because the pipeline will cross the Missouri River.

    The Texas-based company building the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, insists the project is safe. The tribe is fighting the pipeline’s permitting process in federal court.

    Since the number of protesters soared in August in North Dakota, donations started rolling in more frequently and more than 400 people have been arrested — including more than 140 on Thursday when officers evicted protesters camping on private land recently acquired by Energy Transfer Partners.

    But running a camp — and readying it for North Dakota’s brutal winter — isn’t cheap. The account Wicasa set up has only about $100,000 left as of Friday night, according to LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, a tribal historian and preservation employee. She provided family land for use in the original camp in April and still houses demonstrators.

    The money has been used for grocery store trips every two days that cost about $2,000 each, 20 yurts purchased for $160,000, and around $7,000 for bail money. It has also paid for a storage area, composting toilets, tiny houses, tepees, a medical area and generators powered by solar panels and wind.

    A bookkeeper and an accountant now keep track of the crowd-sourced money.

    “I got people to take care of,” Brave Bull Allard said. “I got to provide homes for people and blankets, thermal wear, socks, hats and gloves, and food. Right now, we are feeding 670 people.”

    One online legal defense fund has raised more than $655,000 for “the legal defense of warriors protecting land, water and human rights.”

    Meanwhile, much of the money the tribe is using for the legal fight is from at least $1.3 million in direct donations, tribal chairman Dave Archambault recently told The Associated Press. He declined to say how much tribal officials have spent so far, saying that could give their opponents an advantage in the legal case.

    Energy Transfer Partners also has declined to provide an estimate of its legal expenses. The tribe is pursuing appeals after losing in lower courts.

    The Standing Rock Sioux didn’t solicit money, Archambault said, but asked other tribes for letters of support or formal resolutions. He said it was only after other tribes, including the Red Lake Nation and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community in Minnesota, inquired about financial contributions that leaders decided to accept money for legal costs. And as the protests continued, the tribe decided to also use part of the money for waste-management services for protesters, he said.

    “I know the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is not alone; we have overwhelming support,” Archambault said, adding that his tribe would in return help other tribes “in their fight against corporations.”

    Among the donors to online fundraisers is southern New Hampshire resident Carol DiPirro. She gave $30, motivated in part because of a fight her community waged against a natural gas pipeline.

    “They are saying the same thing: This is our water supply. You run a pipeline through it and it leaks, you are poisoning us. That’s exactly what I spent two years of my life saying,” DiPirro said. “This really, really struck a chord with me.”Crowdsourcing fund for North Dakota pipeline protest tops $1 million
    I gave my first donation directly to the DAPL fund.
    My intention is supporting the protection effort with 10% of my income (and my income is really low level at the moment so my contribution won't go far).
    This is a tangible way to support my alliance with the protectors.
    If everyone who really cares does the same, IMO this is as valuable as showing up there.
    It would be really nice to be ale to go.
    It might be heady and in a weird sense really fun to be in the action.
    But then I wouldn't be able to give anything to take care of the expenses.

    Unlike some people who speak against money, I disagree.
    I love the ease of being able to spend for the people (including my pets) places (going to BE where I choose including home with heat and food) and situations I support.
    My intention is to have more to spend.
    My prayer is that we all access great abundance to make the scales tilt in favor of sanity and beauty.

    I hope everyone reading this has also a desire to send Ben and friends there to Standing Rock.
    Many already did.
    More will follow.
    It is IMO a REAL vote for us (unlike elections).
    My faith is that Great Spirit sends us more to share in the REAL flow of energy...what we LOVE.




    Love is tangible and is money as much as any other energy.
    IMO the main problem with money is having none (something like that said by Stewart Wilde).

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Maggie For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (31st October 2016), Aragorn (31st October 2016), bsbray (31st October 2016), Dreamtimer (31st October 2016), giovonni (31st October 2016), modwiz (31st October 2016), Novusod (31st October 2016), zendeavor (2nd November 2016)

  3. #92
    Member on Sabbatical Morocco modwiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    13th September 2013
    Location
    Outside of Addlepatia
    Posts
    5,781
    Thanks
    35,167
    Thanked 37,389 Times in 5,752 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by Novusod View Post
    There are some scary reports coming out of Standing rock right now.

    I had posted this video on my FB page but, took it down almost immediately after reading comments on the youtube channel it was posted on. I have connections, as do others, to people that are there and this report was missing from them. Looks like the video itself was removed or made private. Good!
    "To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize" -- Voltaire

    "Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people."-- Eleanor Roosevelt

    "Misery loves company. Wisdom has to look for it." -- Anonymous

  4. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to modwiz For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (31st October 2016), Aragorn (31st October 2016), bsbray (31st October 2016), Dreamtimer (31st October 2016), Novusod (31st October 2016), zendeavor (2nd November 2016)

  5. #93
    Member on Sabbatical Morocco modwiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    13th September 2013
    Location
    Outside of Addlepatia
    Posts
    5,781
    Thanks
    35,167
    Thanked 37,389 Times in 5,752 Posts
    We Are Prevailing.

    'Anonymous' Threatens North Dakota Governor After Pipeline Employees Caught Infiltrating Protests To Incite Violence

    “An armed security agent employed by the company behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline was arrested Thursday after he was caught entering the camp of activists protesting near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in southern North Dakota. After a car chase and a standoff during which he allegedly pointed his assault rifle at a local Sioux teenager, the man, whose ID indicated he was an employee of Dakota Access LLC, was arrested and handed over to the FBI.”
    The Morton County Sheriff’s Department circulated a false report claiming the man was shot, presumably by protesters. As you can see in the images above, the man was not harmed. The Sheriff’s Department has since retracted that report. Anti-Media’s attempts to obtain clarifying comments from Morton County Sheriff’s were ignored.
    With the Dakota Access Pipeline builders resorting to backhanded trickery, it’s clear the tide is turning against the pipeline following law enforcement’s overwhelming militarized crackdown of the protests.

    And now, as Anonews reports, Anonymous warns the governor to back off or they will release documents showing the conflict of interest and then goes on to say that if one protestor on the Indian side is harmed, Anonymous will “release docs on” the individuals responsible.
    "To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize" -- Voltaire

    "Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people."-- Eleanor Roosevelt

    "Misery loves company. Wisdom has to look for it." -- Anonymous

  6. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to modwiz For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (31st October 2016), Aragorn (31st October 2016), bsbray (31st October 2016), Dreamtimer (31st October 2016), Elen (31st October 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016), Novusod (31st October 2016), The One (31st October 2016), zendeavor (2nd November 2016)

  7. #94
    Administrator Aragorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th March 2015
    Location
    Middle-Earth
    Posts
    14,449
    Thanks
    63,950
    Thanked 60,073 Times in 14,438 Posts

    Thumbs Up

    Activists Are Using Facebook Check-In to Help Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters


    Source: Time





    More than 100,000 people have checked in on Facebook at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.

    People around the globe are checking in on Facebook at the site of Dakota Access Pipeline protests in North Dakota, in an effort they hope will help protesters avoid detection by police.

    The Facebook activists are following the instructions of a viral post encouraging people to check in at the site to confuse the Morton County Sheriff’s Department. The post claims that local authorities are using Facebook to identify and pursue protesters. Morton County officials denied that they use Facebook to track protesters in a Facebook post of their own.

    The initiative spread like wildfire online Monday, with more than 100,000 Facebook check-ins at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. The reservation has a population of less than 10,000. And, while thousands of activists have descended on the site in recent months, the total number of protesters there is far below 100,000.

    Protest leaders in North Dakota say they were surprised by the Facebook check-in effort, but they appreciate it.

    “It’s nice to know folks out there understand,” says Tara Houska, a leader at the Native American environmental group Honor the Earth on the ground in North Dakota. “There’s incredible surveillance of the camps and we’ve seen the police response rapidly escalate to the now-militarized response to our protest.”

    Protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline have drawn national headlines in recent months as activists have gathered in North Dakota in opposition to the 1,200-mile project, arguing that the project treads on the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and will contribute to devastating climate change. The opposition has grown more heated as police cracked down with pepper spray, dogs, arrests and other controversial methods.


    Source: Time
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

  8. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Aragorn For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (1st November 2016), bsbray (31st October 2016), Dreamtimer (1st November 2016), Elen (1st November 2016), giovonni (1st November 2016), Maggie (1st November 2016), modwiz (1st November 2016), Novusod (1st November 2016), The One (2nd November 2016), zendeavor (2nd November 2016)

  9. #95
    Retired Member United States
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    1,264
    Thanks
    1,691
    Thanked 7,654 Times in 1,264 Posts
    I do a little dancing at this kind of news.....

    Hennepin Co. sheriff's deputies leave Standing Rock protest

    Hundreds of people protested last week, calling on the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office to bring back its staff and equipment from the Standing Rock pipeline protest.


    The protest against the Dakota Access pipeline moved inside Minneapolis' City Hall on Friday

    Now, the sheriff's deputies and equipment are on their way back to Minnesota from the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest in North Dakota.

    Morton County Sheriff's Office spokesman Rob Keller says all Minnesota law enforcement officers have been released as of Monday. He says the state fulfilled its part of the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, or EMAC.

    However, some state lawmakers who represent parts of Hennepin County say the decision by Sheriff Rich Stanek to send personnel and equipment there was inappropriate.

    A group of state legislators who met with Stanek say they think the emergency assistance protocols only apply to natural disasters or an attack on the scale of 9/11.

    "We have an assignment that we're going to go back and try and change a couple parts of the law that will make it clearer the distinction between different types of emergencies," said Rep. Karen Clark, DFL-Minneapolis, who met with Stanek, "so we don't get ourselves in sort of a position again."

    A sheriff's office spokesman says Stanek has declined to comment on the meeting at this time.

    Rep. Peggy Flanagan, DFL-St. Louis Park, said Stanek told the group that about 30 members of the Sheriff's Office went to North Dakota.

    Flanagan, who is also a citizen of the White Earth nation, says the participation of deputies from Minnesota in law enforcement activities at Standing Rock have set back efforts to improve community relationships, especially with Native Americans.

    "Our big ask was, 'What is the sheriff's plan for rebuilding that trust with the community?'" said Flanagan. "Because it has been incredibly damaged and there will have to be much intent and strategy going forward to rebuild it."

    Stanek's decision also drew criticism from Lt. Gov. Tina Smith, who posted her disagreement with the sheriff on Facebook.

    "I do not support Sheriff Stanek's decision to send his deputies to North Dakota, nor did we approve his decision to begin with," reads the statement. "I do not have any control over the Sheriff's actions, which I think were wrong, and I believe he should bring his deputies home, if he hasn't already. I strongly support the rights of all people to peacefully protest, including, tonight, the Standing Rock protest."

    State Rep. Tony Cornish accused Smith of playing politics. In a press release, the Republican from Vernon Center, who is also a retired police officer, said Smith's statement was wrong.

    "Tina Smith not only prioritized the rights of protesters over the needs of law enforcement but also displayed a shocking lack of knowledge in regards to public safety and emergency management," read Cornish's statement. "Neither of these traits are suitable for the person holding the second most powerful office in the State of Minnesota, and she owes the law enforcement community an apology."

    Department of Public Safety spokesman Bruce Gordon said EMAC is a mutual aid agreement between all 50 states.

    "A requesting state asks for resources (people, equipment, etc.) based on their needs," he said. "Agencies in other states with those resources are able to respond to a request, but there is no obligation or order to participate."

    Gordon added that North Dakota is paying for all costs associated with the request it made for assistance.

  10. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Maggie For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (1st November 2016), Aragorn (1st November 2016), Dreamtimer (1st November 2016), Elen (1st November 2016), giovonni (1st November 2016), modwiz (1st November 2016), Novusod (1st November 2016), The One (2nd November 2016), zendeavor (2nd November 2016)

  11. #96
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
    Join Date
    26th September 2016
    Posts
    4,929
    Thanks
    4,814
    Thanked 26,037 Times in 4,937 Posts

    Exclamation

    will share this update here ...

    N Dakota Pipeline Nears Pristine River; Should be illegal !

    Via The Truth Denied


    Published on Nov 1, 2016


  12. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to giovonni For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (1st November 2016), Dreamtimer (2nd November 2016), Elen (2nd November 2016), modwiz (2nd November 2016), The One (2nd November 2016), zendeavor (2nd November 2016)

  13. #97
    Retired Member United States
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    1,264
    Thanks
    1,691
    Thanked 7,654 Times in 1,264 Posts
    From the article below:

    The elder tells the crowd that the seven nations that comprise the Sioux have joined together, along with hundreds of other tribes represented in the camp. He mentions a great black snake to the gathered assembly and many nod in recognition. This is a reference to prophecies dating back to the 1890s from Sioux leader Black Elk, who stated after a series of dreams that in seven generations the seven nations would unite to defeat a great black snake that threatened the world, called the zuzeca (Woolf). It is a well known story within the tribes. Among the crowd stands members of the seventh generation of Sioux since Black Elk’s prophecy. They believe they have met their destiny here in the struggle to turn away the pipeline.


    A REASON FOR SEVEN
    By Faith Phillips


    “Then she told us how times were tough and about how she was thinking about

    Bumming a ride back to from where she started

    But ya know, she changed the subject every time money came up

    She said, ‘Welcome to the land of the living dead’

    You could tell she was so broken hearted

    She said, ‘Even the swap meets around here are getting pretty corrupt.’ ”

    ~Brownsville Girl, Bob Dylan

    Water Protectors.

    A family of four, soon to be five, runs in and out of a flimsy tent on a grassy North Dakota plain. The eldest daughter, Josephine, age 4, wears a pink tutu and wraps herself in a sleeping bag decorated with characters from Frozen, the popular Disney movie franchise. The youngest girl, Charlie, is two. She is a determined force. The entire family remains vigilant to safely contain Charlie’s energy. Their quiet mother manages the camp with an air of humble authority. She wears her waist-length hair tied back at her neck. The father enjoys discussion with relatives when they happen by. He is interrupted here and there to change a diaper and to occasionally yell, “CHARLIE!” when his youngest seizes an opportunity to bolt. The family gathers around a small fire in the evening when Charlie’s energy diminishes at last. Josephine sits on her father’s lap, satisfied to have earned his sole attention. She tosses her head back and laughs, delighted with each joke he tells.

    This family’s camping experience differs somewhat from the typical American one. They are surrounded on all sides by a thousand others, gathered together in a field bordering the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. They speak an ancient language with each other, but politely switch to English in the presence of a non-speaker. Perhaps the most telling detail of this story is that the family can’t say exactly how long they’ve been camped here. Neither do they know how long they will stay, for they have no expectation to leave. This Lakota family of the Sioux tribe, along with thousands more Native Americans, constitute an unprecedented gathering determined to protect the main source of water for their tribe and for millions of other Americans downstream.


    A Primer.

    The encampment began with a handful of tents thrown up in early April. It began as a movement by members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (“SRST”) to demonstrate their opposition to the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline (“DAPL”), a project set to pump nearly 450,000 barrels of crude oil over a route that would plow through land considered sacred by the SRST. The pipeline would be buried beneath the Missouri River at a point just 1/2 mile from the SRST reservation. DAPL’s parent company, Energy Transfer Partners (“ETP”) acquired permits for construction of the pipeline required by federal, state and local law. One of the applicable regulations is the National Historic Preservation Act (“NHPA”). Section 106 of the NHPA requires that the Army Corps of Engineers (“The Corps”) engage in an elaborate consultation process with tribes on projects that stand to affect culturally important locations, as well as potential effects on tribal water supplies (Westney). The NHPA process does not grant veto power to tribes at any point of the consultation/evaluation process (Epstein). The Corp issued a permit for DAPL to proceed on July 26, 2016. In a September 9 decision a federal District Court denied an injunction to stop further work at the site, after which the Department of Justice intervened to halt construction in a specified area of federal land. The land in question consists of both federal and private holdings, some of which was included in the broken Treaties of Fort Laramie 1851 and 1868 (Nienaber [see bibliography after article for parenthetical citations]).

    SRST Chairman David Archimbault II stated in an interview with PBS NewsHour that during the review proceedings conducted by The Corp, “They never heard us. It was just a process that kept moving forward because of economic interest. Money. The interest of greed.” The SRST in effect boycotted the permitting process, with many members choosing instead to engage in an extrajudicial process: the protest camp (Epstein). The tribe entered late into the legal battle in an effort to halt the pipeline’s construction. Chief among the tribe’s arguments: the survey of the land and consultations with the tribe were woefully insufficient. In the meantime, ETP proceeded with construction of the pipeline despite pending litigation, not only in North Dakota, but also in several states downline. The pipeline is 60% complete at present. ETP argued that pipeline transfer is the safest method for the transport of petroleum products, as trains and trucks are much more likely to spill. The obvious point remains that when pipeline leaks do occur, they cause substantially more damage than an overturned tanker. Since 1995 more than 2,000 significant accidents occurred on oil and gas pipelines, causing $3 billion in property damage (Woodruff).

    Water Protectors.

    Joesphine and Charlie ride in a double stroller and wait in line for a plate of food. Their father pays careful attention to an elder standing with a microphone in the center of the assemblage. The elder tells the crowd that the seven nations that comprise the Sioux have joined together, along with hundreds of other tribes represented in the camp. He mentions a great black snake to the gathered assembly and many nod in recognition. This is a reference to prophecies dating back to the 1890s from Sioux leader Black Elk, who stated after a series of dreams that in seven generations the seven nations would unite to defeat a great black snake that threatened the world, called the zuzeca (Woolf). It is a well known story within the tribes. Among the crowd stands members of the seventh generation of Sioux since Black Elk’s prophecy. They believe they have met their destiny here in the struggle to turn away the pipeline.

    History.

    Some Americans expressed outrage with the Justice Department’s intervention in the construction of the pipeline, arguing that the oil company should proceed because the proper legal process for permitting had been met. Those who demand justice and rule of law in defense of ETP and the pipeline place themselves in danger of a precarious position however, as the American legal system with regards this tribe is historically dubious at best.

    The Sioux have much historical legal precedent to justify suspicion of any federal process that pertains to the land. The U.S. government has a demonstrated historical record of multiple treaty violations, in a pattern indicative of systemic intent. The 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie was entered into under the auspices of reaching peace. Sioux members agreed to settle within the Black Hills, a sacred location in their culture. But after gold was discovered by an expeditionary party led by General Custer, the U.S. Army was ordered to move against the Sioux. The government confiscated the land in 1877. The land claim remains unresolved to this day. Through this ongoing legal fight, Natives living in the poorest county in America have repeatedly refused over a hundred million dollars, holding out instead for the return of their sacred hills (Egan).

    Evaluation.

    What possible solutions exist for a citizenry faced with a demonstrated record of injustice on the part of the government and a system that is unashamedly stacked against one party? Reliance upon the interim review process provides little promise and a bleak outlook. Though the action taken by the Justice Department allows for a minuscule sense of victory among the SRST, in effect it guarantees absolutely nothing. To sit back and rely on meaningful action from the government on an ultimate resolution that favors the tribe would amount to an affront to the sacrifice of all those Native families gathered for months now to protect the water and future generations.

    A possible approach comes from an examination of the very theories upon which this government was organized. The Declaration of Independence was heavily influenced by the Lockeian concept of Social Contract Theory. The theory is amenable for debate on both its virtues and evils, but for present purposes let us simply state that Social Contract is a theory upon which the justification of our government rests. It goes something like this: by remaining in the territory controlled by the government, people give consent to join that society and be governed by its government. We gain civil rights in return for accepting the obligation to respect and defend the rights of others, giving up some freedoms to do so. The social contract and the political order it creates are simply the means toward an end – the benefit of the individuals involved – and legitimate only to the extent that they fulfill their part of the agreement. Citizens can withdraw their obligation to obey or change the leadership when the government fails to secure their natural rights (Wikipedia).

    And so we evaluate the plight of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe under the theory upon which this government obliges itself. Let us first consider the political machinations within which SRST is expected to seek justice. In 2009 alone, oil and gas companies spent $154 million dollars on lobbying, setting a new record for the industry (Mulkern). For every $1 the oil industry spends on campaign contributions and lobbying in D.C., it gets back $119 in subsidies. The fossil fuel industry spent $42,373,561 on contributions to the 113th Congress. In 2013 & 2014 the fossil fuel industry received $41,840,275,998 (that’s 41 BILLION) in federal production and exploration subsidies (PriceofOil.org). Neither of the two major party presidential candidates have spoken publicly of the SRST and the DAPL issue, much less indicated a policy position on the issue.

    The oil company acts as oil companies do. This is its raison d’être, to take and continue to take. Even in the days leading up to the ruling in federal court, ETP had the audacity to continue bulldozing through sites that had been identified in court documents just days before as containing ancient burials and other significant cultural artifacts (SRST). That is surely the kind of audacity and flippant regard for the law only taken by an entity absolutely self-assured of ultimate victory. A public outcry will have to grow on a national level in order to effect real change, along with a boycott of businesses associated with ETP and its operating partners, the Enbridge Corporation and Marathon Oil. Rumors abound that investors in the project are already souring on the deal (Westney).

    Perhaps the most effective hope rests with the initial response from the Standing Rock tribe itself, when the members stood their ground and made a public plea for help. The public must continue to demand a national awakening from our fellows. As parties to this “Great Experiment” it is incumbent upon us to push failures out into the light when we witness them. It is the responsibility of those parties to the “social contract” to see that justice is accomplished and unfortunately that means there will never be a day to rest. It serves the interest of governance and our own social stability to call for a remedy when one party has demonstrably and grossly breached its contractual duties. The generational trauma inflicted on this particular segment of society must be brought to an immediate and decided halt. Ultimately, that means ETP will have to find a different way. It shouldn’t be too difficult, after all. The oil company only chose this route after receiving the ire of residents in Bismarck, North Dakota, a largely non-native city that, interestingly enough, became concerned for the safety of their water source.

    Water Protectors.

    A Sioux leader addresses the main camp. He says, “We have to act, but we have to think about those actions and what they will lead to. Some people don’t remember the past. People have to continue to be educated, because we forget.”

    The father of the little Sioux family expresses concern for the outcome of the SRST struggle against the pipeline. Winter is coming. He says he just wants something different for his daughters than what previous generations have endured. They won’t leave. He shoves his hand in his pockets and toes a patch of creeping thistle with his shoe. The Lakota family remains hopeful for the arrival of their first-born son. The mother rests her hand on her stomach. She has recently battled an illness and says she doubts her boy will wait much longer to arrive. They have already decided on the child’s name. He will be called Sakowin. It is the Lakota word for the number seven.

    About the author: Faith Phillips is a granddaughter of the esteemed Cherokee Tribal Council Member Harold “Jiggs” Phillips.

    Bibliography

    Angerman, Brad.“Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Condemns Destruction and desecration of burial grounds by Energy Transfer Partners.” Press Release, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. 3 Sep 2016. Web.

    Egan, Timothy. “The Nation; Mending a Trail of Broken Treaties.” The New York Times. 25 June 00. Web.

    Epstein, Richard. “Why the DOJ Order to Shut Down Construction On The DAPL Pipeline is Legally Indefensible.” Forbes. 14 Sep 2016. Web.

    Mulkern, Anne. “Oil and Gas Interests Set Spending Record for Lobbying in 2009” The New York Times. 2 Feb 2010. Web.

    Neinaber, Georgianne. “DAPL Pipeline Interests Try Outrageous Fait Accompli and Destroy Ancient Sites.” Huffington Post. 4 Sep 2016. Web.

    Westney, Andrew. “A Cheat Sheet To The Sioux Fight To Stop The Dakota Pipeline.” law360.com. 26 Aug 2016. Web.

    Woodruff, Judy. “Tribes Across North America Converge at Standing Rock, hoping to be heard.” PBS NewsHour. 16 Sep 16. Web.

    Woolf, Nicky. “North Dakota Oil Pipeline Protestors Stand Their Ground.” The Guardian. 29 Aug 2016. Web.
    Read Next: Want to Help the Standing Rock Sioux? Here’s Where to Donate
    Last edited by Maggie, 2nd November 2016 at 15:48.

  14. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Maggie For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (2nd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (2nd November 2016), giovonni (2nd November 2016), modwiz (2nd November 2016), The One (2nd November 2016)

  15. #98
    Member on Sabbatical Morocco modwiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    13th September 2013
    Location
    Outside of Addlepatia
    Posts
    5,781
    Thanks
    35,167
    Thanked 37,389 Times in 5,752 Posts
    AP out of Bismarck reports that the Feds have turned down the request of the ND Governor for federal funding to pay for the costs they are running up. The citizens of ND are stuck with the pipeline tab for the out of state cops brought in. The state voted to borrow 10 million from the state owned Bank of ND.

    The world is changing daily. Much of it for the better, IMO.
    "To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize" -- Voltaire

    "Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people."-- Eleanor Roosevelt

    "Misery loves company. Wisdom has to look for it." -- Anonymous

  16. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to modwiz For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (2nd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (2nd November 2016), giovonni (2nd November 2016), Maggie (2nd November 2016), The One (2nd November 2016)

  17. #99
    Tot Founder England The One's Avatar
    Join Date
    12th September 2013
    Location
    In-Be-Tween
    Posts
    10,736
    Thanks
    24,103
    Thanked 47,591 Times in 9,988 Posts

    Could Dakota Access Pipeline Owners Be Legally Liable for Human Rights Abuse

    Raids on anti-pipeline protesters, where over 100 were arrested.


    Published 29 October 2016

    Under U.S. and international law the companies must avoid complicity in human rights abuses, something critics suggest they have not done.

    Owners of the North Dakota Access Pipeline have been warned that they risk legal liability over several instances of human rights abuses agianst peaceful Native American and environmental activists opposing the US$3.8 billion pipeline, as militarized law enforcement have increasingly used violence and repression at protest camps.

    The joint letter released Friday by five environmental and legal advocacy organizations said that the joint owners of the pipeline "have a corporate duty under international law and the laws of the United States to respect human rights and to avoid complicity in further human rights abuses."

    The advocacy groups said that in recent weeks the situation in the Standing Rock camp "has deteriorated further," making reference to recent violent crackdowns by law enforcement and security personnel on peaceful protesters.

    The letter cited several examples of violent intimidation and harassment of Native Americans carrying out their right to free and peaceful assembly, including the arrest of protesters, violent raids, and attacks with dogs that caused a number of injuries to protesters.

    The groups warned the joint owners Energy Transfer, Phillips66 and lender Wells Fargo that the arrests and threats of prosecution for journalists covering the protests and repression is a "clear violation of the First Amendment and of fundamental principles of press freedom organized worldwide."

    The letter said that the owners, on a number of occasions had been working "in concert" with police forces and private organizations carrying out abuses and must take "immediate responsibility for the human rights impacts of their actions."

    These responsibilities also extended to organizations funding the project. "The participation of third persons in the commission of tortious acts will not absolve your companies of responsibility or liability if your operations have aided and abetted the commission thereof," the letter states.

    The pipeline companies were also warned that protesters who have been victims of abuses may seek redress against the companies' actions.

    On Thursday more than 100 heavily-armed police officers used water cannons, pepper spray, and concussion grenades on protesters, arresting 141 protesters and injuring dozens. Last weekend, 126 protesters were arrested, while tear gas was used against them.

    Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman was charged for "rioting" over filming a dog attack on protesters at the Standing Rock Sioux camp on Sept. 3, but charges were eventually dropped by a North Dakota state judge.

    READ:

    US Revives War on Native Americans in North Dakota


    Hillary fails to address environmental concerns of DAPL protests and to recognize that Native American treaty rights and sovereignty have been violated


    When Will It End? US Government Again Uses Militarized Response to Stand of Native Americans to Injustice


    Lawyer's View: Recent Days at Standing Rock
    No one person can ever change the truth, but the truth, once learned, can and will change the person

    You must be the change you wish to see in the world when you are through changing, you are through


    theonetruth forum status theonetruth facebook

  18. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to The One For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (2nd November 2016), Cearna (3rd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (2nd November 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016), Maggie (2nd November 2016), modwiz (2nd November 2016)

  19. #100
    Senior Member Fred Steeves's Avatar
    Join Date
    1st May 2016
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,049
    Thanks
    1,457
    Thanked 6,335 Times in 1,052 Posts
    The joint letter released Friday by five environmental and legal advocacy organizations said that the joint owners of the pipeline "have a corporate duty under international law and the laws of the United States to respect human rights and to avoid complicity in further human rights abuses.
    The Sioux are a sovereign nation, and sovereign nations are generally well armed and prepared to defend their national interests. I've never seen strongly worded letters and pleas from Johnny Letter Writer, stop the bully from doing his thing. The war path is not needed, but basic respect from one's enemy is crucial.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.

    Socrates

  20. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Fred Steeves For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (2nd November 2016), Cearna (3rd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (3rd November 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016), Maggie (3rd November 2016), modwiz (2nd November 2016), Novusod (2nd November 2016)

  21. #101
    Retired Member United States
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    1,264
    Thanks
    1,691
    Thanked 7,654 Times in 1,264 Posts
    Happening earlier today


    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ie1oSeaptjM

  22. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Maggie For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (3rd November 2016), Cearna (3rd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (3rd November 2016), Fred Steeves (3rd November 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016), Novusod (3rd November 2016), sandy (3rd November 2016)

  23. #102
    Senior Member Novusod's Avatar
    Join Date
    21st March 2015
    Posts
    434
    Thanks
    908
    Thanked 2,513 Times in 431 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by Maggie View Post
    Happening earlier today


    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ie1oSeaptjM
    There doesn't appear to be any shooting in the video. Could this be another false alarm?

  24. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Novusod For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (3rd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (3rd November 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016)

  25. #103
    Administrator Aragorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th March 2015
    Location
    Middle-Earth
    Posts
    14,449
    Thanks
    63,950
    Thanked 60,073 Times in 14,438 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by Novusod View Post
    There doesn't appear to be any shooting in the video. Could this be another false alarm?
    At 08:43 you can clearly hear a gunshot, and then the camera swivels around and somebody says "Shots fired", and at around 08:55 or so you hear the guy with the camera asking a woman "Are you alright?", and she nods "yes" with a painful expression on her face just before she collapses, and the guy with the camera shouts "Get a medic! Get a medic!"

    I'm not saying that this woman did actually get shot — maybe she was suffering from something else — but you can hear a firearm going off at 08:43, and given the sequence of events and the woman collapsing, I do think that she was hit. Even if it was only a rubber bullet, those things can cause serious internal bleeding and even break ribs, depending on the range and what type of firearm they were fired from — rifle versus shotgun, et al.

    Rubber bullets are not toy bullets or airsoft pellets. The official name for that kind of ammunition is "less-than-lethal ammunition". From up close, it is lethal, and you have to be quite a distance away from the muzzle of the firearm — again, depending on whether it was a rifle or a shotgun — in order to not have any internal injuries from getting shot with that kind of ammo.

    Judging by the sound of the gunshot, I would also posit that it was a rifle or possibly a 9 mm carbine or a pistol, not a shotgun. A single rubber bullet fired from a shotgun at a distance the width of that river would probably not be very effective. A rubber bullet fired from a rifle or a carbine would however have a greater range, a higher velocity and a much meaner and much more painful impact.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

  26. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Aragorn For This Useful Post:

    Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (3rd November 2016), Fred Steeves (3rd November 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016), Maggie (3rd November 2016)

  27. #104
    Retired Member United States
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    1,264
    Thanks
    1,691
    Thanked 7,654 Times in 1,264 Posts


    Aug 19, 2016
    Thom talks about the Lakota Tribe's standoff over the oil pipeline, and the tribe's prophecy about the Black Snake that could end the world.


    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRMFdNUjnl8


    Russell Means: Americans Are The New Indian

    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3IUnFq3U0Y




    John Neihardt reciting Black Elk's Prayer. Neihardt wrote the prayer shortly after the 1931 historic talks he had with Black Elk at Pine Ridge Reservation. He was able to capture in poetic form what the great Sioux holy man was relating to him in Lakota conversation. In 1971 Neihardt recorded his recitation of the prayer. Thirty five years later, grandson Robin composed the music and combined it digitally with John Neihardt's recording. The old photos in the video clip were taken by John Neihardt and his daughter Hilda during the 1931 meetings.

    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI5WBd4mpKw

  28. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Maggie For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (3rd November 2016), Dreamtimer (3rd November 2016), Elen (3rd November 2016), Fred Steeves (3rd November 2016), giovonni (3rd November 2016), sandy (3rd November 2016)

  29. #105
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
    Join Date
    26th September 2016
    Posts
    4,929
    Thanks
    4,814
    Thanked 26,037 Times in 4,937 Posts

    Thumbs Up



    Standing Rock Rising

  30. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to giovonni For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (3rd November 2016), Maggie (3rd November 2016), modwiz (3rd November 2016), sandy (3rd November 2016)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •