Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 24

Thread: Trump Warning of Financial Collapse

  1. #1
    Permanently Banned United States
    Join Date
    16th January 2015
    Location
    Au dela
    Posts
    2,918
    Thanks
    17,643
    Thanked 12,684 Times in 2,912 Posts

    Trump Warning of Financial Collapse

    Trump has made comments before about how he hopes the economy doesn't collapse before he even gets the chance to take office, but there is a repeating pattern that implies that the economy will suffer a collapse before the next president takes office. A collapse occurred at the end of Clinton's presidency before Bush II took office, and the 2008 collapse (which was much worse) took place right before Obama took office.

    In this video they go over this pattern in more detail. I think it's worth a watch.


  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to bsbray For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), Fred Steeves (12th May 2016), heyokah (4th June 2016), Juniper (12th May 2016), sandy (12th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  3. #2
    Senior Member United States
    Join Date
    3rd May 2015
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    298
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1,654 Times in 295 Posts
    Interestingly, Trump's friend and co-author, Robert T. Kiyosaki, says that Depressions occur approximately every 75 years.

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Gale Frierson For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), bsbray (12th May 2016), Juniper (12th May 2016)

  5. #3
    Permanently Banned
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    408
    Thanks
    63
    Thanked 1,073 Times in 359 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by Gale Frierson View Post
    Interestingly, Trump's friend and co-author, Robert T. Kiyosaki, says that Depressions occur approximately every 75 years.
    75 years (+/- x years) where x is in the probability range of +/- 8 years with a Gaussian distribution)

  6. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to scibuster For This Useful Post:

    BabaRa (12th May 2016), bsbray (12th May 2016), Dreamtimer (12th May 2016), Juniper (12th May 2016)

  7. #4
    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th April 2015
    Location
    Patapsco Valley
    Posts
    10,917
    Thanks
    58,397
    Thanked 48,549 Times in 10,834 Posts
    And an empire lasts 250 years or so...

  8. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Dreamtimer For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), bsbray (12th May 2016), Juniper (12th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  9. #5
    Permanently Banned
    Join Date
    8th November 2015
    Posts
    408
    Thanks
    63
    Thanked 1,073 Times in 359 Posts
    Kopfrechnen ohne Taschenrechner: 2016 y - 250 y =

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to scibuster For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), bsbray (12th May 2016), Juniper (12th May 2016)

  11. #6
    Permanently Banned United States
    Join Date
    16th January 2015
    Location
    Au dela
    Posts
    2,918
    Thanks
    17,643
    Thanked 12,684 Times in 2,912 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by Gale Frierson View Post
    Interestingly, Trump's friend and co-author, Robert T. Kiyosaki, says that Depressions occur approximately every 75 years.
    We're overdue in that case, since 1929 was 87 years ago.

    I'm not sure where we could draw the line for the US becoming an empire though. Somebody could make argument arguments for the US being an extension of British imperialism, taking land from the natives, and so we were an empire from the start. Or someone could say, no, we revolted from an empire and formed an independent republic, and became imperialistic much later. Depends how "empire" is defined too I guess. The US didn't really develop an imperialist foreign policy until well after the industrial revolution, unless you count the Mexican War... Very confusing.

    Either way, England doesn't dominate the world like it used to, but it still has many overseas holdings (and Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) and it's been a long time that it's had those. China is also a very ancient empire in a way, since so many nationalities are incorporated into its borders, and languages.


    Some more reading on the Trump/economic collapse front:

    Guess what Donald Trump is saying now? Last week, I discussed how Robert Kiyosaki and Harry Dent are warning that a major crisis is inevitable, but I didn’t expect Donald Trump to come out and say essentially the exact same thing. On Saturday, the Washington Post released a stunning interview with Donald Trump in which he boldly declared that we heading for a “very massive recession”. He also warned that we are currently in “a financial bubble” and that “it’s a terrible time right now” to be investing in stocks. These are things that you may be accustomed to hearing on The Economic Collapse Blog, but to hear them from the frontrunner for the Republican nomination is another thing altogether.

    Whether you plan to vote for Donald Trump or not, at least we can all appreciate that he doesn’t talk like a politician. He tells it like he sees it, and he told the Washington Post that he considers the official unemployment rate that is put out by the Obama administration to be completely fraudulent…

    “First of all, we’re not at 5 percent unemployment. We’re at a number that’s probably into the twenties if you look at the real number,” Trump said. “That was a number that was devised, statistically devised to make politicians — and, in particular, presidents — look good. And I wouldn’t be getting the kind of massive crowds that I’m getting if the number was a real number.”

    [...]

    Of course things are about to get a whole lot worse. According to Challenger, Gray & Christmas, job cut announcements by major firms were up 32 percent during the first quarter of 2016 compared to the first quarter of 2015.

    When big corporations are doing well, they tend to hire more people. But when their earnings start to go down, one of the very first things they tend to do is to lay people off.

    [...]

    In the past, we have almost always seen corporate profit margins peak and start declining before a recession hits. The following chart comes from Jesse Felder, and it shows that this has happened prior to almost every recession in the post-World War II era, and now it is happening again…

    http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/a...s-a-good-thing
    Last edited by bsbray, 12th May 2016 at 16:51.

  12. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to bsbray For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), Cearna (19th May 2016), Dreamtimer (12th May 2016)

  13. #7
    Senior Member donk's Avatar
    Join Date
    26th December 2013
    Posts
    1,035
    Thanks
    1,669
    Thanked 4,995 Times in 998 Posts
    We have a pretty small sample size (recorded history), not to mention the "bias" of the writers of history.

    These timelines are rather useless IMO, I learned in a supposedly "good" Economics school that jubilee is necessary every 70 or so years for a fiat currency system or it collapses on the weight of it's own fake debt...we're technically "overdue" for that.

    I'm fairly certain technological progress has skewed any possibility of predictive discernment when it comes to the black magic of monetary systems' policy.
    What is the purpose of your presence?

  14. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to donk For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), bsbray (12th May 2016), Cearna (19th May 2016), Dreamtimer (12th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  15. #8
    Permanently Banned United States
    Join Date
    16th January 2015
    Location
    Au dela
    Posts
    2,918
    Thanks
    17,643
    Thanked 12,684 Times in 2,912 Posts
    There's no doubt a lot of artificiality to the system, but one thing that's not artificial is all the millions of people in 3rd world countries working in sweatshops and other terrible conditions just to bring us stuff like cheap Wal-Mart clothes and electronics gadgets. I was just talking with some friends yesterday about how if the US and other western nations descended into 3rd world conditions, we'd think it was the end of the world, but those people have been suffering with that for a long time.

  16. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to bsbray For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (12th May 2016), Cearna (19th May 2016), Dreamtimer (12th May 2016), Fred Steeves (12th May 2016), sandy (13th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  17. #9
    Senior Member Fred Steeves's Avatar
    Join Date
    1st May 2016
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,100
    Thanks
    1,500
    Thanked 6,533 Times in 1,101 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by bsbray View Post

    In this video they go over this pattern in more detail. I think it's worth a watch.


    Yes, it was worth a watch. I don't give a flip about Trump or any of the others, as it's of course the Fed pulling the economic strings, not the Pres. An interesting side note, is that in talking to people of the various forums over the years, the crash of 2008 proved to be instrumental in initiating the awakening process for many whereas 9/11 hadn't, including yours truly.

    I well recall sitting on the edge of the couch, a freshly unemployed carpenter, watching the news as the market imploded, thinking wtf is going on here? These people, Bush, Paulson, Bernanke, etc., people I have always looked up to as great leaders, are *lying* to me, and I want to know why. Yep, they lost another one that day...

    As Newton's third law states: "For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction".

    There is always a price to pay, the laws of physics will not be denied. Food for thought IMO.


  18. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Fred Steeves For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (17th May 2016), bsbray (13th May 2016), Dreamtimer (13th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  19. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    10th June 2015
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    2,129
    Thanked 3,246 Times in 920 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by Gale Frierson
    Interestingly, Trump's friend and co-author, Robert T. Kiyosaki, says that Depressions occur approximately every 75 years.
    Social restructuring perhaps is a better way to call it. And I think it has a 70 year period +- 10 perhaps. Here is some background.

    Things where set in motion right at the end of a great empire in the east, in 1775 when Pugachev was killed. Videos Elen has been sharing, the survivor series, places Pugachev in a nation and civilization of Tartaria. His death was soon followed by the signing of a document on July 4, 1776 that signaled the start of a nation that had to rewrite its constitutions in 1789 so that it could find a way to pay a federal debt.

    The original 1789 document is unavailable for public examinations. A replica, is on display in the Smithsonian. That is interesting isn't it. Official original documents that every leader swears to protect from all enemies, foreign and domestic is also "missing"?

    Why?

    One reason presented to me, and all of you are encouraged to make up your own mind about this, is that the original document was originally drafted by the leaders of the day, who where also members of masonic secret organizations, as a type of draft or bond that would be offered to creditors as "payment" for the dept ladened federal government without taxation powers at that time.

    So the holders of that document would be creditors who essentially where entitled to payment by the government for their participation in some federal expense, the financiers of the Revolutionary War that ended in 1782 (if memory serves). The document was signed by representatives of all states backing the union, if you remember.

    The acceptance of payment would require the creditors to endorse the document as well, much like we must endorse a check when we deposit or cash it at the bank, by signing the reverse side of the document.

    So the document is kept secret because the globalist families/organizations that funded that war would be revealed and all of history as has been fabricated hereto comes into contention of authenticity. These are probably the same families/organizations that architected the end of Tartaria.

    Why 70 year cycles?

    It happens to be the bankruptcy period for debts as defined in Admiralty.

    1789 + 70 years = 1869 <= right about the time we had a civil war. A war where the southern states wanted to secede from the Union. Guess why? The paper their representatives had signed 70 years earlier had matured and required payment...

    1869 + 70 years = 1929 <= great depression. Looks like someone tried to pay the money, withdrew everything from the markets and found they didn't have enough money. we got the federal reserve act passed during a +- 10 year margin from that year.

    1929 + 70 years = 1999 <= that isn't really so long ago. NSA got new powers and +- 10 year margin saw at least 2 wars, tons of paper destroyed in two identical towers in NYC, the open passage of secret law and treaties designed to "fight terrorism". ObamaCare with passages covering a contingent health issue of chipping people...


    ___

    So Trump, if he becomes president, will get to take up representing the US (and all its chattel) as head of a US Corporation that answers to the current holders of a "missing" document. Holders who likely have plans about how their asset should perform.

    It doesn't really matter whether it is Trump, Clinton or even Sanders.

  20. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to lcam88 For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (12th May 2016), BabaRa (17th May 2016), bsbray (13th May 2016), Dreamtimer (13th May 2016)

  21. #11
    Permanently Banned United States
    Join Date
    16th January 2015
    Location
    Au dela
    Posts
    2,918
    Thanks
    17,643
    Thanked 12,684 Times in 2,912 Posts
    Even if the original "US Constitution" document did say something different than the one we all know, I don't think that should make any difference to us in terms of what we expect from our politicians. The constitution that we all know is the shortest (in terms of words) and longest-lasting constitution by any major national government still in use, because it is straight to the point and functional and provides for a balance of power. Whether or not it's honored by politicians is another issue.

    Some funny stuff may have been going on around the time of the American Revolution but I find it hard to believe that anything massively different than what we are taught was going on at that point in history. The mainstream historical record of the American Revolution is already incriminating enough if you look at it closely enough, but not as far as covering up an eradicated kingdom (aside from a few exceptions like a cover-up related to the Lewis and Clarke expedition, for example). I think there was a vast civilization across much of North, Middle and South America, but by the time your average European peasant, debtor or criminal was migrating to the Americas, it was long since wiped out. The natives who were left here, that the early colonists encountered, were not the ones that built the impressive archaeological sites like at Hopewell or Newark, and they admitted as much. They may have been wiped out as late as the 1300's and 1400's, before Columbus, because the Knights Templar at least were already making voyages to the Americas and taking gold and silver back to Europe to fund a clandestine financial network that the Catholic Church eventually suppressed in the early 1300's during the "Babylonian Captivity of the Church" in France. But I really have a hard time believing anything major happened any later than that, when they started freely sending over your average Europeans by the boatload.

    Anyway I think we're getting away from the real issue here which is another pending financial collapse and what that would look like, and what we would have to change in our lives if that happens.

    I think it's always a good idea to get to know how our ancestors lived off the land before industrialization. During the Great Depression most Americans still gardened or farmed, if I recall correctly. I know my ancestors did. Their main sources of food were their own gardens until well after WW2. Most of us have lost that today and it puts us in a very vulnerable position if another major depression were to strike.

  22. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to bsbray For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (13th May 2016), BabaRa (17th May 2016), Dreamtimer (13th May 2016), Elen (14th May 2016), Greenbarry (13th May 2016), lcam88 (13th May 2016), PurpleLama (16th May 2016), sandy (13th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  23. #12
    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th April 2015
    Location
    Patapsco Valley
    Posts
    10,917
    Thanks
    58,397
    Thanked 48,549 Times in 10,834 Posts
    "I think it's always a good idea to get to know how our ancestors lived off the land before industrialization. During the Great Depression most Americans still gardened or farmed, if I recall correctly. I know my ancestors did. Their main sources of food were their own gardens until well after WW2. Most of us have lost that today and it puts us in a very vulnerable position if another major depression were to strike."

    This is something I've always been aware of and yet I'm certainly not self-sufficient. I do have the capability to garden and could keep something like chickens (if I had a coop). There are plenty of predators around who would try to eat them. Of course there are many deer, but I'm no hunter.

    My dad and I discussed this and he basically said, "You'd better hope that never happens." The men in my family are business men who golf and ride bikes and do nothing like hunting, or building, or gardening, or working with animals. My mom used to garden, she's no longer with us.

    Bright side, my son is capable of becoming self-sufficient if he had to. He still has many skills to learn but he could do it.

    And what are our leaders doing? Setting themselves up to get rich again from failures?

  24. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Dreamtimer For This Useful Post:

    Aianawa (13th May 2016), BabaRa (17th May 2016), bsbray (13th May 2016), Elen (14th May 2016), lcam88 (13th May 2016)

  25. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    10th June 2015
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    2,129
    Thanked 3,246 Times in 920 Posts
    Quote Originally posted by bsbray
    I think it's always a good idea to get to know how our ancestors lived off the land before industrialization. During the Great Depression most Americans still gardened or farmed, if I recall correctly. I know my ancestors did. Their main sources of food were their own gardens until well after WW2. Most of us have lost that today and it puts us in a very vulnerable position if another major depression were to strike.
    Yes!

    I'm not saying that American Revolution history is necessarily inaccurate in terms of battles, wars and factions. I'm just saying that it is quite incomplete.

    If you sort of accept the hypothesis that I've presented, the oath to defend the constitution is a pledge to defend much more that what the words happen to say. If the document was indeed a UCC instrument that defined our government structure for the purpose of repaying a debt, defending the constitution is simply a pledge to the creditors holding the instrument.

    During the 1700's everyone was part of a secret organization of some kind and it was culture and custom to have hidden or secrets built into basements, sculptures, art of all kinds. Why not a secret portion of this document as well?

    And that is what it is. <shrug/> We think we know, we presume we know, not because we do, but because it would be too painful for the ego to accept that all this time it was investing in an illusion.

    Just saying.

    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer
    I think it's always a good idea to get to know how our ancestors lived off the land before industrialization.
    I like the idea very much. Can't do it like our ancestors did though; our environment is completely different. Hydroponics.

    All of that creates dependencies with suppliers, requires a minimum economy of scale to function.

  26. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to lcam88 For This Useful Post:

    BabaRa (17th May 2016), bsbray (13th May 2016), Dreamtimer (17th May 2016), Elen (14th May 2016)

  27. #14
    Permanently Banned United States
    Join Date
    16th January 2015
    Location
    Au dela
    Posts
    2,918
    Thanks
    17,643
    Thanked 12,684 Times in 2,912 Posts
    There is plenty enough stuff growing wild to survive on if it became necessarily, like the absolute worst possible economic scenario. Getting familiar with a field guide for wild edibles opens that possibility up. Winter is the big danger as far as food crunches go but even that wouldn't be a totally hopeless situation.

    If it were still winter I'd go out and take some pictures of the ground here. People think that nothing grows in the winter but that's not true. Some plants like spinach and barley actually require cold temperatures to really thrive. If you have a field guide to wide edible plants, the most common ones (like dandelion, plantain, lamb's quarters, wild lettuce) grow all over the place and can even last through the winter, though most growth slows down or comes to a stop. I have strawberries that keep green leaves throughout the winter, after being buried in snows and all, and those are edible and rich in vitamin C. The natives taught early colonists to make tea out of pine needles to keep from getting scurvy, because they're also rich in vitamin C. It seems like most people don't think about this and so people talk about resorting to stuff like eating tree bark in the winter in an emergency situation, which might be necessary if you lived somewhere like northern Canada or Scandinavia, but other than that it really shouldn't be necessary. If somebody knows how to fry greens up in oil or butter, they can be really tasty too.

    But then if you live in Brazil like lcamm then you don't have to worry about any of this winter food business.

  28. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to bsbray For This Useful Post:

    BabaRa (17th May 2016), Dreamtimer (17th May 2016), Elen (14th May 2016), lcam88 (13th May 2016), PurpleLama (16th May 2016), Wind (13th May 2016)

  29. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    10th June 2015
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    2,129
    Thanked 3,246 Times in 920 Posts
    bsbray:

    I say hydroponics because it's just more productive to take control of plant growth. I'm not saying that plants growing in perlite being fed water with plant food directly to the roots is going to be equal than natural grown, but certainly when you depend on food produced by your own growing efforts the radically changed environment is a factor that works against you. Taking control of this makes sense. To me anyway. I'd rather be prepared for 3 months of no rain than have to declare my efforts to be insufficient.

    I think this is going to become a big problem even here in Brazil.

    That said, no agrotoxics, and perhaps it makes sense to seek more organic and natural sources of plant food. Perhaps use something more like dirt, rather than perlite. There are so many ways to tweek the growing environment to produce something less like conventional hydroponics and more natural.

    PS I like the pine needle tea idea.

  30. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to lcam88 For This Useful Post:

    BabaRa (17th May 2016), bsbray (13th May 2016), Dreamtimer (17th May 2016), Elen (14th May 2016)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •