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Thread: Richard Feynman - No Ordinary Genius

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    Richard Feynman - No Ordinary Genius

    From Wiki,

    Richard Phillips Feynman (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics (he proposed the parton model). For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. He developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams. During his lifetime, Feynman became one of the best-known scientists in the world. In a 1999 poll of 130 leading physicists worldwide by the British journal Physics World he was ranked as one of the ten greatest physicists of all time.[3]

    He assisted in the development of the atomic bomb during World War II and became known to a wide public in the 1980s as a member of the Rogers Commission, the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. In addition to his work in theoretical physics, Feynman has been credited with pioneering the field of quantum computing,[4][5] and introducing the concept of nanotechnology. He held the Richard Chace Tolman professorship in theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology.

    Feynman was a keen popularizer of physics through both books and lectures, notably a 1959 talk on top-down nanotechnology called There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, and the three-volume publication of his undergraduate lectures, The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Feynman also became known through his semi-autobiographical books Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! and What Do You Care What Other People Think? and books written about him, such as Tuva or Bust!.


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    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUJfjRoxCbk


    Richard Feynman's lecture on quantum Probability and Uncertainty in the "Messenger" series of lectures on Cornell University 1964. He elucidates the Double Slit Experiment, which includes the feature of the observer participating in creating the manifestation of the observed object either as a non-local diffracting wave or as a distinct local particle (lump): Contemporary orthodox quantum physics and early Buddhism agrees on this the "Participatory Observation (Anthropic) Principle" coined by American physics grand old man John Archibald Wheeler: More on Genesis and Observership:
    http://youtu.be/ayMSfm2A9ro
    http://youtu.be/RH1-HmQGrsk
    http://youtu.be/7h3hxEFyL1A
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSxDoS...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zf29I...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropi...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Arc...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/ont...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/IV/...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/II/...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/III...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpre...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/IV/...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/II/...
    http://What-Buddha-Said.net/library/p...

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