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Thread: Cookery/Recipes

  1. #16
    Senior Member Highland1's Avatar
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    As food is also natures medicine, I hope you all do not mind me placing this here:

    5000 Year Old Buddhist Recipe

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    This ancient recipe of a pharmacist was found in 1972 in a Buddhist monastery in the mountains of Tibet. It was dated to be 5,000 years old.

    PREPARATION:

    Add 350 grams of crushed garlic in a glass jar. Pour over it 220-250 grams of 95-96 alcohol, rum or other spirits.


    WARNING:

    The alcohol may not contain other substances, like benzalkonium chloride or methanol. - See more at:

    Close the jar hermetically and place in the refrigerator for 10 days.

    In the 11th day filter it all with a very fine strainer or gauze.
    The resulting liquid is poured into the same pot and placed another 2 days in the refrigerator.


    TREATMENT:

    After this period, the remedy is ready for treatment (the drops may be taken with some milk or water before starting to eat), as follows:

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    Continue with 25 drops/ 3 times a day, until you finish the entire quantity.


    **THIS THERAPY MAY BE REPEATED ONLY ONCE EVERY 5 YEARS!
    CURES:

    The sick myocardial diaphragm;

    Arteriosclerosis;

    Sinusitis;

    Hypertension;

    Lung disease;

    Arthritis and rheumatism;

    Various vision and hearing disorders;

    Impotence;

    Lack of appetite;

    Gastritis, stomach ulcers and hemorrhoids;

    Clears the body of fats and stones (kidney, gall);

    Improves the metabolism and thus all blood vessels (re)become elastic;

    Melts the blood clots;

    Regulates the body weight;

    And possibly the most important one:

    It absorbs any internal and external tumors!

    Read more at http://www.realfarmacy.com/5000-year...3DJd6iIzArQ.99

    Russ
    "There can only be One Truth"

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  3. #17
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    Mother's Day Irish Bread Recipe

    Irish Soda Bread

    I have not made this yet, will tomorrow, but my brother says it is the best bread he's ever baked:

    4 cups of plain flour - organic
    2 teaspoons of bicarbonate of soda
    1 teaspoon of pink Himalayan salt
    60 grams of organic butter, cubed
    2 to 2 and a quarter cups of buttermilk

    Preheat oven to 190 Celsius, line a tray with baking paper. Sift the flour, bicarb and salt into a large bowl.

    Rub in the cubed butter with clean hands with the flour until it looks like breadcrumbs.

    Mix in the buttermilk to form a dough. Bring together on a floured surface to form a ball. Give it a good kneading and knock it around a bit.

    Shape dough into a 20cm round. Place on tray.

    Cut a cross in the top (I Love crosses).

    Bake for 35-45 minutes.

    Serve with butter and maple syrup or manuka honey.

    Best and cheapest Mother's day present ever!

    With a cup of tea of course. In bed.

    But let Mum have a good, long sleep-in!

    Happy Mother's Day to all.

    Edit: Of course you can always slice it and freeze as well.
    Last edited by Sooz, 8th May 2014 at 13:01.

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  5. #18
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    Here is a recipe I just made up - I use my intuition mostly. I was looking online for a good horseradish paste and decided to make my own.

    With winter time coming up here in Oz, I want to protect my body against all those nasty flu and cold viruses. (Haven't had a cold or flu for over 3 years).

    I have not made this yet, but wanted to share it:

    Horseradish Paste
    Use organic where you can.

    Half cup of grated horseradish
    Pinch of turmeric powder
    Pinch of cinnamon powder
    Pinch of cardamom powder
    Tablespoon of finely chopped parsley
    Melted butter - about a teaspoon
    Apple cider vinegar, a little slurp
    Teaspoon of grated ginger
    Teaspoon of grated garlic
    Teaspoon of grated lemon rind
    Slurp of hemp oil
    Pinch of red cayenne pepper for extra bite
    Pinch of cumin powder

    Mix all dry ingredients, add the hemp oil and apple vinegar enough to form a paste.

    Keep in airtight container in fridge. Great on all types of meat and veggies. Or mix a few spoons into soup. Heck, even a bit on toast!

    iggy:

    Maybe even a little molasses to sweeten it up. About half a teaspoon.

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  7. #19
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    googled chinese hot mustard and this is what came up in images


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  9. #20
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    Yeah there's quite a few of Spiral kicking about online, it's just embarrassing really.....

    Anyway ahem...



    As some of you know I LOVE all things Italian, harking back to very vivid memories of a past life and also just a general love of the country, people and culture.....not to mention the food mmmm nom nom.

    On the old TOT site I put up a recipe for Jamie Olivers' Wonky Pasta. To save myself the repetition I have a twist on it that I saw last night, haven't tried it yet but can't wait to!

    Serves 2

    Bucatini pasta (This is slightly fatter spaghetti with a hole through the middle which holds the sauce within it)
    Olive Oil (extra virgin if poss)
    Three egg yolks
    Half a lemon
    Small squeeze of lime
    Half a small orange
    Lardons (I personally hate lardons, so would opt for a cured ham such as parma or speck, maybe even bacon but it's preference of the individual of course....)
    Chopped parsley OR chopped basil (one or the other because they have a none complimentary relationship in my view)
    Parmesan or hard cured cheese of choice
    Black pepper

    Method

    Put sufficient pasta for two in salted, boiling water and cook until al dente. Meanwhile, grab a frying pan and pour a couple of table spoons worth of oil into it while still cold. Leave off the heat and put in the egg yolks, the juice from the lime, lemon and orange. Add cooked ham (in whatever form....ie if lardons, pre-cook in separate pan), grate in the cheese and bring to heat. Once warmed through spoon the pasta into the pan too allowing some of the water you cooked it in to fall in too. As the egg cooks into the boiling water and mixes with the juices and cheese it forms the sauce. Allow to fry lightly for one minute and serve into a pasta bowl. Generously pile the herbage on top and grate further parmesan and black pepper for the top to taste.




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  11. #21
    Senior Member shamanseeker's Avatar
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    Pizzoccheri alla Valtellinese

    Pizzoccheri (pronounced peetsockery) comes from the Valtellina, a valley running eastwards from the top of Lake Como, only a little way from Switzerland and St Moritz. The Valtellina was part of Switzerland until Napoleon started 'playing' with European boundaries. It is quite famous for its cuisine and wines. Pizzoccheri are short pieces of 'tagliatelle' but made from buck wheat flour with a little white flour and so are low in gluten. This is a perfect winter dish and really delicious; I love it . If you can't find pizzoccheri where you live, I think the best alternative would be short, brown pasta.



    Ingredients (for 4)

    For the pasta (if you know how to make pasta):

    400 grams of buck wheat flour
    100 grams of white flour
    salt

    For the condiment:

    200 grams of casera D.O.P. cheese (In the Valtellina they use a little bitto cheese. It's very tasty and very expensive even here in Italy so not everyone uses it and you can't use only bitto because of it being so tasty. What most Italians do is use some Casera cheese which is also delicious but not as strong or as expensive as Bitto but it's still quite expensive. Most people only use the less expensive but still very good Fontina cheese which is like a Swiss cheese which when it melts and you pick it up with a fork you get that 'stringy' affect.)
    100 grams of butter
    100 grams of grated parmesan
    1 small winter cabbage (different people use different vegetables - my favourite is the traditional winter cabbage because the dark green leaves are delicious with the buck wheat, potatoes and cheese; some people prefer spring cabbage but I find that a bit bland; what is called 'coste' in Italian but 'Swiss chard' in English is really good with pizzoccheri in my opinion because the leafy part is a very dark green; spinach is very good with pizzocheri too)
    3 potatoes
    a few sage leaves
    salt
    black pepper
    a clove of garlic

    Cut the potatoes into rough shaped cubes (not too small and not too big. Cut the vegetables into strips. Cook the potatoes and veg in abundant salted water for 10 minutes. Add the pizzocheri to the potatoes and veg and cook for a further 15 minutes. Meanwhile simmer the butter and garlic in a pan and add the sage (being careful not to let it go brown).

    Remove the pizzocheri, veg and potatoes from the water and put them into an oven dish alternating them with the chopped-up cheese. Then grate some black pepper and parmesan over the top and pour the butter over the dish. You can put it in a hot oven for a few minutes and it's even more delicious i.m.o!

    Buon appetito
    Last edited by shamanseeker, 22nd May 2014 at 17:16.

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  13. #22
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    At this time of the year the elderflowers are blooming so it is a good idea to make use of this wonderful herb. I just made my elderflower cordial today, it already smells heavenly but what is more important it is so good for the immune system. Elderflower has antiviral and immune- boosting properties and can be made into an infusion for treating colds, flu and feverish symptoms.

    Elderflower is thought to strengthen the mucus membranes of the respiratory tract, increasing resistance to allergens so I am intending to give it to my son and my hubby to keep the hayfewver at bay.

    I used this recipe and I need to point out that it is without citric acid. I intend to freeze what I can't consume so I don't need preservative.

    Elderflower Cordial


    20 elderflower heads (I forgot to keep counting and used half of the basketful I’d gathered)
    4 lemons
    2 oranges
    1.8 kg granulated sugar
    1.2l water

    this is what I made. It is dark because I used raw cane sugar. I couldn't think of substitute for the sugar here so I made it as the recipe suggested.

    Place the sugar in the water in a saucepan and bring to the boil, stirring until all the sugar is dissolved. While the water is heating, place the elderflowers in a large bowl and cut the zest off the oranges and lemons and add to elderflowers. Cut the ends off the citrus fruit and discard, then slice and add to contents of bowl. Pour the boiling sugar syrup over the elderflowers and citrus fruits. Cover the bowl and place in a cool place for 24 hours. I put a plate on the top of the bowl to keep the citrus fruit submerged in the syrup. After 24 hours strain (eat the orange slices – they are amazing!). Strain twice more using either muslin or kitchen paper. Makes 4 pints of cordial. Pour into sterilized glass jars and freeze. Keep in the fridge and dilute to taste. It tastes good with fizzy water. Serve in glass jugs with slices of lemon and a sprig of mint.

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  15. #23
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    leftovers,do you throw them away?
    made a chili con carne yesterday and there was plenty left.
    so with the leftovers made some chili pasties.
    hopefully they will turn out alright.

    next time i make a curry my intention with any leftovers will to make curry pudding,s.
    as in steak and kidney pudding that you buy from the chippy.
    chip,s and a curry pudding sounds delish.
    not sure how to make suet though,but will suss it out.

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  17. #24
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    Quote Originally posted by ronin View Post
    leftovers,do you throw them away?
    made a chili con carne yesterday and there was plenty left.
    so with the leftovers made some chili pasties.
    hopefully they will turn out alright.

    next time i make a curry my intention with any leftovers will to make curry pudding,s.
    as in steak and kidney pudding that you buy from the chippy.
    chip,s and a curry pudding sounds delish.
    not sure how to make suet though,but will suss it out.
    Eh lad, you buy suet, you don't make it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suet

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  19. #25
    Senior Member Cearna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Spiral View Post
    Eh lad, you buy suet, you don't make it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suet
    Suet is the outer fat from kidneys, we used to teach the making of suet for dumplings and pastry, so if you want to buy some the best place would be a good old fashioned butcher, they may keep some aside, but with the modernisation of butchery by supermarkets, most suet would be chucked out as not being saleable, very few people use suet these days. I'm older and was taught to do this sort of thing, because we grew up making all the good old English traditional food, and you can't get much more old fashioned than suet puddings and pie. I remember several hours being shown at the really old style cooking school how to make pigeon pie and three hours each Thursday being shown how to make the old lollies and cake decorating when I was in training to come out to be a Cookery Teacher.
    You are what you are, no more, no less. The fact is, that all is not what it seems to be, some may be great, some may be small, but to your own want to be free, I say, you never were not free. It is what your own Self, gave yourself to be in, that's what makes you what you are. Loving kindness be upon you and yours.

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  21. #26
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    today i am trying curry puddings.
    make a curry that you enjoy.
    i made the suet using a brand name. here are the results.
    one curry


    suet prepared and ready for filling.


    filled puddings.


    awaiting to be steamed.


    because the pudding cases where only small i saved some of the curry i prepared as extra sauce.

    half chips and rice maybe

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  23. #27
    Senior Member Cearna's Avatar
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    Looks wonderful to me, enjoy such a satisfying creation Ronin !!!!!
    You are what you are, no more, no less. The fact is, that all is not what it seems to be, some may be great, some may be small, but to your own want to be free, I say, you never were not free. It is what your own Self, gave yourself to be in, that's what makes you what you are. Loving kindness be upon you and yours.

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  25. #28
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    Ronin, you might like to try Karē-pan. It's a Japanese food made by "wrapping" some curry in bread dough. The dough is usually then fried, but baking is also done. It's normally made using solid parts of the curry rather than the sauce, but I often make it with just sauce by freezing curry sauce, wrapping chunks of it in bread dough and then leaving it a while before baking it in the oven. Smaller "loaves" made in like buns/cupcakes are ridiculously addictive

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  27. #29
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    they look good Seikou-Kishi ,i you tubed them.
    my favorites are chinese dim sum.
    sui mai,steamed buns ect.
    there,s loads on you tube on how to make them.

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  29. #30
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    watched Hugh fearnley-whittingstall river cottage veg every day last night,this series is about just eating vegatables and such no meat.
    i only caught this one so far but he made a veg stew/soup that looks very appetizing.
    next time i get paid i,m gonna try this one,here,s the recipe.

    Pumpkin, sweetcorn and bean soup

    The last of summer's corn and green beans meet the first of the autumn squashes – inspired by the Chilean dish porotos granados. Serves six.

    2 tbsp rapeseed or olive oil
    1 onion, peeled and diced
    2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped
    1 tsp sweet, smoked paprika
    2 tbsp chopped oregano (or marjoram)
    100g small dried beans (pinto, navy or cannellini), soaked overnight, or 400g tin of beans, drained and rinsed
    1 litre vegetable stock
    1 bay leaf
    750g squash (butternut, crown prince or onion), peeled, deseeded and cut into 2cm chunks
    200g green beans, trimmed and cut into 2cm pieces
    Kernels cut from 2 corn cobs
    Sea salt and ground black pepper

    Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, and saut for 10 minutes. Add the paprika and a tablespoon of the oregano. Cook for a minute more.

    Dried beans version
    Drain the beans and add to the pan with the stock and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer for 45 minutes, or until the beans are completely tender (cooking times for dried beans vary; this may take over an hour). Add the squash, stir and simmer for 10-15 minutes, until the squash is just tender, add the green beans and corn kernels, and simmer for five minutes more.

    Tinned beans version
    Add the drained, rinsed beans, stock and bay leaf at the same time as the squash, and simmer until the squash is just tender, around 10-15 minutes. Add the green beans and corn, and simmer for a few minutes more.

    To finish both versions, season generously, stir in the remaining oregano, leave to settle for a couple of minutes and serve.

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