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  1. #5491
    Senior Member Lord Sidious's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by giovonni View Post
    Big Poppa & Rad

    ♪ Come on down ♪


    I know that wizardnugget from somewhere...................
    Ní siocháin go saoirse

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  3. #5492
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Returning Topic

    Quote Originally posted by giovonni View Post

    And speaking of great guitar sounds ...

    The Byrds 10 Essential Locations Part 1: Recording Studios,
    Homes. LA & Laurel Canyon.

    Hiking4Life


    Part 1 (of 2). 10 Essential locations in Byrds History: World Pacific Studios, Columbia Square, The Troubadour, Ciro's, Band Member Homes in Laurel Canyon & LA locations, Hollywood Haunts and Recording Studio insights into the essence of this legendary band. David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, Chris Hillman, Gene Clark & Michael Clarke.
    Mar 18, 2021

    9:51 minutes



    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmOpndlMyEA



    (IE example)


    The Byrds - It Won't Be Wrong


    2:02 minutes


    As promised ...


    The Byrds Part #2: 10 Essential Locations: Laurel Canyon,
    David Crosby, McGuinn, Clark, Hillman

    Hiking4Life


    Part 2 (of 2). 10 Essential Byrds locations: Band Member Homes in Laurel Canyon & Beverly Glen. Beatles/Byrds Party House in Beverly Hills. David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, Chris Hillman, Gene Clark & Michael Clarke.

    Mar 26, 2021

    9:25 minutes



    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlYIe4Ap53o




    Performing raw for the girls ...


    The Byrds: Live 10/19/1965.
    Turn! Turn! Turn!, Bells Of Rhymney, & Mr. Tambourine Man.



    10:57 minutes


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  5. #5493
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Question

    # Trending ...

    Why Don't Record Labels Believe In Young Artists?

    Rick Beato


    In this episode I discuss and question why record labels don't have more faith in artists writing their own material and the current rising trend of older artists selling their publishing rights for millions.

    Apr 3, 2021

    15:23 minutes


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  7. #5494
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Thumbs Up

    A song's story - as legend has it ...



    Descriptive:

    A drive down Pacific Coast Highway listening to a favorite song of mine .



    "Ventura Highway" ...

    Is a 1972 song by the band America from their album Homecoming, written by Dewey Bunnell.

    Background:


    Dewey Bunnell, the song's vocalist and writer, has said that the lyric "alligator lizards in the air" in the song is a reference to the shapes of clouds in the sky he saw in 1963 while his family was driving down the coast from Vandenberg Air Force Base near Lompoc, California, where they had a flat tire. While his father changed the tire, his brother and he stood by the side of the road and watched the clouds and saw a road sign for "Ventura".

    In the booklet for the boxed set, Highway, he states that the song "reminds me of the time I lived in Omaha as a kid and how we'd walk through cornfields and chew on pieces of grass. There were cold winters, and I had images of going to California. So I think in the song I'm talking to myself, frankly: 'How long you gonna stay here, Joe?' I really believe that 'Ventura Highway' has the most lasting power of all my songs. It's not just the words — the song and the track have a certain fresh, vibrant, optimistic quality that I can still respond to". The song has a "Go West, young man" motif in the structure of a conversation between an old man named Joe and a young and hopeful kid. Joe was modeled after a "grumpy" old man he had met while his dad was stationed in Biloxi, Mississippi at Keesler Air Force Base. He also stated "I remember vividly having this mental picture of the stretch of the coastline traveling with my family when I was younger. Ventura Highway itself, there is no such beast, what I was really trying to depict was the Pacific Coast Highway, Highway 1, which goes up to the town of Ventura."

    "That's Gerry and Dan doing a harmony on two guitars on the intro. I remember us sitting in a hotel room, and I was playing the chords, and Gerry got that guitar line, and he and Dan worked out that harmony part. That's really the hook of the song".

    The song contains the phrase "purple rain", later the title of a 1984 song, album, and film (and the tour that supported both the album and film), from the artist Prince. Whether any connection actually exists, both Mikel Toombs of The San Diego Union and Bob Kostanczuk of the Post-Tribune have written that Prince got the title directly from "Ventura Highway". Asked to explain the phrase "purple rain" in "Ventura Highway," Gerry Beckley responded: "You got me."

    The song won many fans, including the pro wrestler-turned-politician, Jesse Ventura. Bunnell recalled, "We went and played at Governor Jesse Ventura's inaugural out in Minneapolis. He asked us to — his wife is a horse lady, and she'd always loved 'A Horse with No Name', and he had adopted this name Ventura. So when he put together his cast of characters for his big inaugural celebration, he wanted us to come and play two songs, which we did".

    Driving the Ventura Highway


    3:29 minutes


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  9. #5495
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Via Harvard Gazette

    Music everywhere ...



    Comprehensive study explains that it is
    universal and that some songs sound ‘right’
    in different social contexts, all over the world



    "Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote, “Music is the universal language of mankind.” Scientists at Harvard have just published the most comprehensive scientific study to date on music as a cultural product, which supports the American poet’s pronouncement and examines what features of song tend to be shared across societies.

    The study was conceived by Samuel Mehr, a fellow of the Harvard Data Science Initiative and research associate in psychology, Manvir Singh, a graduate student in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, and Luke Glowacki, formerly a Harvard graduate student and now a professor of anthropology at Pennsylvania State University.

    They set out to address big questions: Is music a cultural universal? If that’s a given, which musical qualities overlap across disparate societies? If it isn’t, why does it seem so ubiquitous? But they needed a data set of unprecedented breadth and depth. Over a five-year period, the team hunted down hundreds of recordings in libraries and private collections of scientists half a world away.

    “We are so used to being able to find any piece of music that we like on the internet,” said Mehr, who is now a principal investigator at Harvard’s Music Lab. “But there are thousands and thousands of recordings buried in archives. At one point, we were looking for traditional Celtic music and we found a call number in the [Harvard] library system and librarian told us we needed to wait on the other side of the library because there was more room over there. Twenty minutes later this poor librarian comes out with a cart of about 20 cases of reel-to-reel recordings of Celtic music.”

    Mehr added those reel tapes to the team’s growing discography, combining it with a corpus of ethnography containing nearly 5,000 descriptions of songs from 60 human societies. Mehr, Singh, and Glowacki call this database The Natural History of Song.

    Their questions were so compelling that the project rapidly grew into a major international collaboration with musicians, data scientists, psychologists, linguists, and political scientists. Published in Science this week, it represents the team’s most ambitious study yet about music."


    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXhyRbidcmo



    Music appears in every society observed.


    “As a graduate student, I was working on studies of infant music perception, and I started to see all these studies that made claims about music being universal,” Mehr said. “How is it that every paper on music starts out with this big claim, but there’s never a citation backing that up … Now we can back that up.”

    They looked at every society for which there was ethnographic information in a large online database, 315 in all, and found mention of music in all of them. For the discography, they collected 118 songs from a total of 86 cultures, covering 30 geographic regions. And they added the ethnographic material they’d collected.

    “I started to see all these studies that made claims about music being universal. How is it that every paper on music starts out with this big claim but there’s never a citation backing that up … Now we can back that up.”


    The team and their researchers coded the ethnography and discography that makes up the Natural History of Song into dozens of variables. They logged details about singers and audience members, the time of day and duration of singing, the presence of instruments, and more for thousands of passages about songs in the ethnographic corpus. The discography was analyzed four different ways: machine summaries, listener ratings, expert annotations, expert transcriptions.

    They found that, across societies, music is associated with behaviors such as infant care, healing, dance, and love (among many others, like mourning, warfare, processions, and ritual). Examining lullabies, healing songs, dance songs, and love songs in particular, they discovered that songs that share behavioral functions tend to have similar musical features.

    “Lullabies and dance songs are ubiquitous, and they are also highly stereotyped,” Singh said. “For me, dance songs and lullabies tend to define the space of what music can be. They do very different things with features that are almost the opposite of each other.”

    Source/references


    (i.e. example)

    I Can't Tell You Why

    REO Brothers - / The Eagles

    "I Can't Tell You Why" is a song by the American rock band Eagles, which appeared on their 1979 album The Long Run. It was written by band members Timothy B. Schmit, Glenn Frey, and Don Henley. Recorded in March 1978, it was the first song finished for the album and the first Eagles song to feature Schmit on lead vocals."
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    6:06 minutes


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