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Thread: Culture Wars fought in the media.

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    Culture Wars fought in the media.

    I wonder if this is a lame attempt to randomly cancel shit or just to stir the pot. People who object to stuff like peanut butter (that has a grossness factor no greater than the salty yeast paste spread on toast) need to a get a life, I suspect people don't find stuff as objectionable as the media portrays now that everything is the Jerry Springer show. But nonetheless I find some of it amusing and some even thought provoking as differences in cultures tend to be. Most of them focus on the same things though, Peanut butter, American cheese etc.

    Some articles thoughts are even really legit thoughtful like wondering why we turn on a red light when driving in America. Short answer. It saves time.

    https://www.mashed.com/116164/americ...le-foreigners/

    American cheese. Even Americans agree that it is gross. But its not as gross as everything thinks. There's the neon orange totally fake variety that can't be called cheese because it isn't. They have a plastic texture and are actually gross. Those are called American slices. Mostly vegetable oil. Most of these objectionable foods are low income centered and targeted towards kids. The poor have to eat something here in the US and with inflation they are stuck with the 'gross' foods since they are generally cheaper.

    Real American cheese is cheese. It's made out of cheddar or colby jack. The only reason its called processed cheese food is that an emulsifier is added so it melts nicely. Usually egg yolks. Not chemicals necessarily. It melts fast and doesn't get stringy and has a distinct mild flavor that goes with everything. Hence its popularity especially with kids who generally don't like conventional cheese flavors. Try feeding an American child bleu cheese or Limburger. Those are acquired tastes here.

    Peanut Butter.

    My understanding is that European PB tastes different so they presume their PB tastes the same as ours? Why are they eating horrid PB?

    There's a thousand different varieties of PB in the US so not sure what they are wailing about but they need to back their racist asses off because PB is a African American invention and widely celebrated during black history month. It's a legume like a pea so not junk food. It's a staple because its high protein, fast, and healthier than the other shit targeted at kids. Some have more sugar than the other but overall not very sugary at all.


    Sweet potato casserole.
    Do they mean to be racist or they ignorant? Black cuisine and soul food. Yes its sugary. Take it up with the same people who invented PB. The marshmallows were a fad some years back and not that popular anymore.

    Cheez Whiz. I've never met an adult that eats this stuff. Again, kid oriented marketing and usually for lower income people. You can find a decent variety of it that is like canned American cheese so not as horrid as some might think.

    Wonder bread is a mystery to me. It turns into a paste if handled too much. And there even cheaper varieties of pasty, non-food white bread so I'm not sure that this is targeted at poor people. I have personally never seen it in any kitchen because everyone knows its shit. Was popular in the 50's though when kids ate Mayo and Wonder bread sandwiches.

    Hershey Chocolate. Used to be good until it went internationally corporate. It's now a theme park and in the pursuit if charitable causes so I guess the chocolate making took a back seat. Instead of complaining just eat your own European chocolate we already know its better, its imported like crazy here.

    Corn dog is somehow worse than a Irish sausage roll how? A sausage wrapped in dough or bread? The stick? It's carnival food, real junk food usually regarded as a once in a while treat. Not a staple food.

    Chicken and waffles. Tut tut. Black soul food, racist. Back off. But not loved by all Americans. It's an indulgence. Too expensive for low income folks and too obviously unhealthy to be a staple. I hate to be obvious but waffles are not an American invention and neither is fried chicken.

    Grits. More soul food, that went mainstream especially in the south. Buttery grits with shrimp and cheese is the best. It's ground grain, hardly worse then ground oatmeal, wheat or rice. These articles are more revealing of people's ignorance than anything else. And... It seems black cultural foods get attacked more than anything else. Ironically enough since the media is ever ready to squawk about anything that suggests that people are different from each other.

    Pop tarts along with sugary commercial cereal started with the Saturday morning cartoon phenom in America. Again mostly targeting low income families and latch key kids. Not strictly mainstream . Everyone knows how unhealthy commercial processed cereal is.



    Eggs and bacon. Eggs= cheap but healthy protein options. Before Bidenomics struck a dozen eggs were .39 to .89 cents. Bacon has always been cheap form of low quality protein, but not anymore again with Bidenomics. Pigs were popular when settling the country vs cows or sheep in already settled nations. A simple read of history tells us that.

    Biscuits and gravy. Pioneer, poor people and depression era food all at once. It kept people from starving and still does. A couple pounds of bacon and a bag of flour, and a little baking powder and people could live on this for months. And they did. Just ask Dolly Parton. There's two kinds, sausage gravy and milk gravy made with bacon drippings. The bisquits in the photo look gross. You make good cathead biscuits by putting the dough in a hot greased cast iron skillet and baking them the proper way. After trying most of my life I can make milk gravy nearly as good as my Aunt Meedy. Universally loved, but not really that different from Yorkshire puddings which have gotten really popular here.

    At this conjecture I guess the media must think Europe never had any poor people or peasants in it and everyone ate beef and pheasant. Most of the foods targeted are mostly low income people or foods targeting kids.

    Root beer. Shrug. All colas and sodas started out as medicinal. Not sure why root beer is that much more objectionable then ginger ale.

    We like ice. Unlike most of northern Europe it can get really hot and humid in most parts of the nation. And with all the fresh water it was easier to have ice all year around and even poor people could have ice in the summer and the concept just stuck. The diner and drive in and drag ways era of the 50's and 60s solidified ice as part of every drink.

    Frito pie. Bordering on racism again. Tut tut. Why are Americans into Mexican or American Mexican food? Because Mexico borders and lots of our people are from Mexico . I'm not sure Europeans are into Mexican food. Are they? Mexican food is also cheap eats.

    Next post: European stuff that seemingly baffle Americans but I doubt Americans are obsessing over it any more than Europeans are obsessing over biscuits.


    Your thoughts?

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    https://www.buzzfeed.com/hannahloewe...ind-in-america

    This is probably not a good example. Buzz feed is responsible for a good portion of ignorance in America. Most of the ingredients of these foods are not hard to find in America. So this is really just a bitch about why you can't easily buy these foods already prepared over the counter or at a diner.

    Don't be absurd. Kinder Suprise and Cruesli are widely available in America. But we go by demographics, some regions might not find either product appealing and may not be in certain areas. Anyplace there's kids though there's Kinder Suprise.

    Dutch Pancakes . These you can find in diners and places that cater to the tourists in the northern middle west. Popular on the east side of Michigan (It's called Holland, Michigan for a reason...derp) and throughout the Great Lakes area up into Minnesota and Ontario and anywhere yooper sounding people are found. That's where Dutch people settled. We can even buy wooden clogs. And everyone loves windmill cookies.

    Smørrebrød

    Apparently the folks at Buzzfeed haven't been inside and Aldis. That thick dark dense rye bread that butter won't melt into is sold there. No reason why this couldn't be made at home.

    You can buy Paprika pringles online to be shipped anyplace in America. Pringles are fake chips anyway. Real Paprika chips are found here and there and probably in Canada for sure.

    A Pylsa mostly resembles a Chicago style hotdog. I see no reason why someone can't make the sauce to put over it. Remoulade is not unheard of in America.

    And yes we grow wine grapes and make wine in America and the local varieties are usually very popular in their localities. I find this baffling. If it's better or worse than European wine is up to the palate but to suggest we don't have local wines is just idiotic.

    Tapas bars are better in big cities.

    Döner Kebab. All over the place and in German cafes. The Middle Eastern style is throughout northern Ohio and SE Michigan. There's a party store that sells them up the street from where I'm sitting.



    Jamon Ibérico, Again a visit to Aldis one of the most ubiquitous shops in the US should fix someone right up. And most of its imported. From Europe.

    Gelato alla Nocciola Popular in NYC and other areas with a dense concentration of Italians. Gelato parlors are not that uncommon here. Neither is Hazel nut.

    Suppli not commonly found here, but Italian restaurants abound. Neither is Txakoli all of which sound very local and regional and is akin to bitching about why they don't have Dearborn style gyros in London.

    Käsespätzle . Found all over the place from Nothern Michigan to Cincinatti and wherever else there is a high density of people of German extraction. Sold in German style cafes.

    European chocolate is found in better grocery stores all over even in little rural areas because America is made up of a lot of, ahem, Europeans.


    I'm going to find a better example. I think Buzzfeed is just preying on people's ignorance.

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    ttps://www.thetravel.com/european-foods-americans-wouldnt-touch/#it-s-hard-to-eat-when-dinner-is-watching

    Travel magazines are better and more informative.

    I'd have to say most of this is a legitimate nope for me since so much of it revolves around rotting innards.

    With the caveat that roast suckling pig isn't uncommon in larger cities at pretentious cafes and hog roasts are very common. They are usually done outside BBQ style. Sheeps heads were not uncommon until recently. In large cities like NYC it was poor people's foods in the slums and barrios. My dad liked sheeps cheeks with brown mustard.

    Generally would have to say we as a people are not really brain or intestine oriented but Latinos and Hispanics have several dishes that have brains and innards.

    And they have forgotten souse, which is called head cheese, made from the bits of sheeps and pigs heads plus the brains which cause the souse to gel up. Popular down south. I don't see it in stores anymore. Even Oscar Mayer had a version of it. My family ate it, heavily peppered. I found it revolting.

    And no Americas are not into maggots on their food.

    The stinky fish recipes are not that unusual among the Great Lakes yooper sounding people whose ancestors settled there.

    Blood sausage is not common but not rare either. It's called liver sausage though, not sure why.

    The yooper sounding people are known for eating the lampreys that invaded the Great Lakes in recent decades.


    But overall I'm giving most of it a big nope.

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    Quote Originally posted by Diabolical Boids View Post
    I'm not sure Europeans are into Mexican food. Are they?
    Well, not Mexican as such, but Spanish food is almost as popular over here as Italian food — we're very much into Italian food here — and Mexican culture is of course originally in large part Spanish, blended in with the preexisting South-American cultures from before the arrival of the conquistadors. Therefore it follows that Mexican cuisine also has at least part of its roots in Spanish cuisine.

    That said, the consumerist society model has already imported many American cultural phenomena into Europe, including some that are not actually US American in origin but that can still be considered popular in the USA. So when it comes to those things — which includes Mexican food, like tacos and chili — it's second-hand import. The US imported it from Mexico, and we over here in turn imported it from the USA, because the US is still regarded by most people here as the leader on account of anything new and cool. I guess we've got Hollywood to thank for that.

    Among the things that got imported here are Halloween — which never even existed here until the very late 1980s — and certain foods, like having cereal for breakfast. This, specifically, was due to Kellogg's, and it entered Flemish culture through the ads on Dutch television first, and then because the product began appearing in the supermarket racks over here. Just like Coca-Cola, Fanta, Sprite, Pepsi-Cola, 7Up, and what have you, although those had already been around longer — they were already around when I was a very young boy, in the mid-to-late 1960s, and 7Up was advertised a lot on Dutch television. So was Stimorol chewing gum — I still remember the tune, even. And Levi's.

    Back then there was no cable TV yet — everyone who owned a TV had to have a big antenna on their roof — and we could only watch a few channels on TV. The francophone channels — including the francophone channel of the Belgian public television network — and the German channels all used overdubbing instead of subtitles, so whatever was broadcast on those channels was just meaningless to most of the people here unless they spoke the language. My dad knew some French and some German, but my mom did not, and neither did the rest of the family. Therefore, the only viable options were the (single) Flemish channel of the Belgian public television network and the two Dutch channels. And there were no ads on the Belgian channels yet in those days, but the Dutch network did have two short advertising blocks before and after the 19:00 news.

    But so anyway, before the arrival of cereal, we here in Belgium concretely were having a breakfast that, depending on one's own family-based culture, varied between the very small French-style breakfast — usually one or two sandwiches with strawberry jam or chocolate paste — on the one hand, and the stronger English variety on the other hand, where you had (soft- or hard-)boiled eggs for breakfast, albeit that it was never as huge a breakfast over here as in England itself. I was actually quite surprised by that when I went to in England in 1981.

    A typical English breakfast comprises two eggs sunny-side-up, three or four grilled sausages, a stack of toast, jelly, a glass of orange juice and a cup of either coffee or tea — I suspect the coffee was just because we were foreigners, because the British prefer tea. And they also never put lemon in their tea, but instead they add milk — naturally, you cannot have both at the same time because the lemon would spoil the milk in a second.

    The idea of this big breakfast is that the English consider breakfast to be the most important meal of the day, as it has to give you the calories that you will be burning throughout the rest of the day. Conversely, the French petit déjeuner falls more in line with those people whose stomach needs a longer time to wake up in the morning — some people even skip breakfast altogether for that reason and will simply settle for a cup of coffee in the morning.

    But since we're talking about cuisine, there's this little bit of folklore that I do have to share with you — I've already explained this elsewhere several times, though, but that was before you joined up here in the Shire. It's about what you Americans call French fries. See, they're not actually French, but rather a Belgian culinary invention. The story of how Americans came to call them French fries is quite innocent, however — I can't hold this against you guys.

    As you may remember from a still relatively recent post of mine regarding Belgium's past as an officially francophone country in spite of the fact that some 65% of the Belgian population speaks Dutch and only some 32% speaks French, when the US American and Canadian soldiers arrived here in Belgium at the end of World War I, they were being served French fries — which the British call potato chips — at the restaurants that had survived the bombardments. But because the bourgeoisie all spoke French and regarded Dutch as "a peasant's tongue", those American soldiers actually thought they were in France. And so they took the recipe back home with them as "French fries".

    I guess that makes us Belgians partly responsible for the existence of McDonald's, but okay...
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    Quote Originally posted by Diabolical Boids View Post
    I wonder if this is a lame attempt to randomly cancel shit or just to stir the pot. People who object to stuff like peanut butter (that has a grossness factor no greater than the salty yeast paste spread on toast) need to a get a life, I suspect people don't find stuff as objectionable as the media portrays now that everything is the Jerry Springer show. But nonetheless I find some of it amusing and some even thought provoking as differences in cultures tend to be. Most of them focus on the same things though, Peanut butter, American cheese etc.

    Some articles thoughts are even really legit thoughtful like wondering why we turn on a red light when driving in America. Short answer. It saves time.

    https://www.mashed.com/116164/americ...le-foreigners/

    American cheese. Even Americans agree that it is gross. But its not as gross as everything thinks. There's the neon orange totally fake variety that can't be called cheese because it isn't. They have a plastic texture and are actually gross. Those are called American slices. Mostly vegetable oil. Most of these objectionable foods are low income centered and targeted towards kids. The poor have to eat something here in the US and with inflation they are stuck with the 'gross' foods since they are generally cheaper.

    Real American cheese is cheese. It's made out of cheddar or colby jack. The only reason its called processed cheese food is that an emulsifier is added so it melts nicely. Usually egg yolks. Not chemicals necessarily. It melts fast and doesn't get stringy and has a distinct mild flavor that goes with everything. Hence its popularity especially with kids who generally don't like conventional cheese flavors. Try feeding an American child bleu cheese or Limburger. Those are acquired tastes here.

    Peanut Butter.

    My understanding is that European PB tastes different so they presume their PB tastes the same as ours? Why are they eating horrid PB?

    There's a thousand different varieties of PB in the US so not sure what they are wailing about but they need to back their racist asses off because PB is a African American invention and widely celebrated during black history month. It's a legume like a pea so not junk food. It's a staple because its high protein, fast, and healthier than the other shit targeted at kids. Some have more sugar than the other but overall not very sugary at all.


    Sweet potato casserole.
    Do they mean to be racist or they ignorant? Black cuisine and soul food. Yes its sugary. Take it up with the same people who invented PB. The marshmallows were a fad some years back and not that popular anymore.

    Cheez Whiz. I've never met an adult that eats this stuff. Again, kid oriented marketing and usually for lower income people. You can find a decent variety of it that is like canned American cheese so not as horrid as some might think.

    Wonder bread is a mystery to me. It turns into a paste if handled too much. And there even cheaper varieties of pasty, non-food white bread so I'm not sure that this is targeted at poor people. I have personally never seen it in any kitchen because everyone knows its shit. Was popular in the 50's though when kids ate Mayo and Wonder bread sandwiches.

    Hershey Chocolate. Used to be good until it went internationally corporate. It's now a theme park and in the pursuit if charitable causes so I guess the chocolate making took a back seat. Instead of complaining just eat your own European chocolate we already know its better, its imported like crazy here.

    Corn dog is somehow worse than a Irish sausage roll how? A sausage wrapped in dough or bread? The stick? It's carnival food, real junk food usually regarded as a once in a while treat. Not a staple food.

    Chicken and waffles. Tut tut. Black soul food, racist. Back off. But not loved by all Americans. It's an indulgence. Too expensive for low income folks and too obviously unhealthy to be a staple. I hate to be obvious but waffles are not an American invention and neither is fried chicken.

    Grits. More soul food, that went mainstream especially in the south. Buttery grits with shrimp and cheese is the best. It's ground grain, hardly worse then ground oatmeal, wheat or rice. These articles are more revealing of people's ignorance than anything else. And... It seems black cultural foods get attacked more than anything else. Ironically enough since the media is ever ready to squawk about anything that suggests that people are different from each other.

    Pop tarts along with sugary commercial cereal started with the Saturday morning cartoon phenom in America. Again mostly targeting low income families and latch key kids. Not strictly mainstream . Everyone knows how unhealthy commercial processed cereal is.



    Eggs and bacon. Eggs= cheap but healthy protein options. Before Bidenomics struck a dozen eggs were .39 to .89 cents. Bacon has always been cheap form of low quality protein, but not anymore again with Bidenomics. Pigs were popular when settling the country vs cows or sheep in already settled nations. A simple read of history tells us that.

    Biscuits and gravy. Pioneer, poor people and depression era food all at once. It kept people from starving and still does. A couple pounds of bacon and a bag of flour, and a little baking powder and people could live on this for months. And they did. Just ask Dolly Parton. There's two kinds, sausage gravy and milk gravy made with bacon drippings. The bisquits in the photo look gross. You make good cathead biscuits by putting the dough in a hot greased cast iron skillet and baking them the proper way. After trying most of my life I can make milk gravy nearly as good as my Aunt Meedy. Universally loved, but not really that different from Yorkshire puddings which have gotten really popular here.

    At this conjecture I guess the media must think Europe never had any poor people or peasants in it and everyone ate beef and pheasant. Most of the foods targeted are mostly low income people or foods targeting kids.

    Root beer. Shrug. All colas and sodas started out as medicinal. Not sure why root beer is that much more objectionable then ginger ale.

    We like ice. Unlike most of northern Europe it can get really hot and humid in most parts of the nation. And with all the fresh water it was easier to have ice all year around and even poor people could have ice in the summer and the concept just stuck. The diner and drive in and drag ways era of the 50's and 60s solidified ice as part of every drink.

    Frito pie. Bordering on racism again. Tut tut. Why are Americans into Mexican or American Mexican food? Because Mexico borders and lots of our people are from Mexico . I'm not sure Europeans are into Mexican food. Are they? Mexican food is also cheap eats.

    Next post: European stuff that seemingly baffle Americans but I doubt Americans are obsessing over it any more than Europeans are obsessing over biscuits.


    Your thoughts?
    Take a trip to Pappasito's Cantina and you wouldn't think so cheap! Americans, I swear they can make anything expensive. They give you twice as much food as you need or want and charge you twice as much as you want to pay. I always look for the greasy spoon places. Good food, much better price and just not so much sh*t going on, like 'frontin'. Of course those tend to shut down or get shut down.

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    Quote Originally posted by Diabolical Boids View Post
    I'm not sure Europeans are into Mexican food. Are they?
    It depends on the person, but yes supermarkets have the spanish or mexican food section with tortillas and tacos.

    Then of course there are restaurants too. Personally I can't eat spicy food. I have liked tortillas though, not sure about tacos.

    Japanese food is very popular here as in sushi is, it has become quite common food like pizza and many really like it.
    "The more I see, the less I know for sure." ~ John Lennon

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    Quote Originally posted by Wind View Post
    It depends on the person, but yes supermarkets have the spanish or mexican food section with tortillas and tacos.

    Then of course there are restaurants too. Personally I can't eat spicy food. I have liked tortillas though, not sure about tacos.

    Japanese food is very popular here as in sushi is, it has become quite common food like pizza and many really like it.
    Japanese food isn't so big here as in some places but sushi really is. People who won't eat any kind of Japanese food will eat sushi. Weirdly the number one rated seller of sushi is a popular chain grocery store . It's not raw raw sushi but acid cooked with lemon juice.

    There's two kinds of tacos. The gringo tacos for conventional Americans. Thats kind of like what you'd get a franchise with ground beef, seasoning, onions (if you are lucky) tomatoes, lettuce, and sour cream. It doesn't resemble a Mexican taco (but I like them) at all which is more like a fajita but better. The authentic ones are more greasy than spicy. They are served with a variety of sauces that can heat them up to taste. No sour cream or that sort of 'nonsense'. Spice is a level of preference. You can get or cook all manner of Mexican food and keep the heat and spice down.

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    Quote Originally posted by Chuckie View Post
    Take a trip to Pappasito's Cantina and you wouldn't think so cheap! Americans, I swear they can make anything expensive. They give you twice as much food as you need or want and charge you twice as much as you want to pay. I always look for the greasy spoon places. Good food, much better price and just not so much sh*t going on, like 'frontin'. Of course those tend to shut down or get shut down.
    Really? Maybe Gringos own them or they are meant to be trendy. . Most of the shops owned by actual Mexicans around here range between dirt cheap to pretty reasonable. It's cheap to make at home and most of the cafe's are reasonably priced. My favorite place has a nacho that is served in a extra large pizza box, its gigantic. And only about 10 dollars. Yea its a huge serving and it takes three days to eat but that's three days of meals for ten dollars.

    I look at the huge American serving sizes in that way. When I cook we eat left over for two days after. One pot of chicken and dumplings and one pot of chili fed three people for a week at a cost of about 25 dollars this week. I hardly ever eat out but when I do the huge serving size means there days of meals. Or at least two. I kind of think of it as value based.

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    Quote Originally posted by Diabolical Boids View Post
    Really? Maybe Gringos own them or they are meant to be trendy. . Most of the shops owned by actual Mexicans around here range between dirt cheap to pretty reasonable. It's cheap to make at home and most of the cafe's are reasonably priced. My favorite place has a nacho that is served in a extra large pizza box, its gigantic. And only about 10 dollars. Yea its a huge serving and it takes three days to eat but that's three days of meals for ten dollars.

    I look at the huge American serving sizes in that way. When I cook we eat left over for two days after. One pot of chicken and dumplings and one pot of chili fed three people for a week at a cost of about 25 dollars this week. I hardly ever eat out but when I do the huge serving size means there days of meals. Or at least two. I kind of think of it as value based.
    True enough, but to me it is just two or three days of 'unhealthy' foods because of all the add ons in unhealthy types of fat. Probably due to genetics more than anything else, I have a very low resting pulse rate, blood pressure when I'm not stressed is normal and my cholesterol ratio of HDL vs LDL is unusually good. If only my mental health was as robust.

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    The genetics theory was blown out of the water is pretty much old failed news now. Modern medicine is going to have to follow eventually but it won't once as long as they can continue to convince people they are doomed by their genes. The most evidential model the one that actually helps people heal is how our pollutive thoughts and emotions create stress chemicals that damage genes, turn protective genes off, and make otherwise healthy genes create unhealthy proteins--and that creates disease. All that can be reversed instantly.

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    Aragorn

    Among the things that got imported here are Halloween — which never even existed here until the very late 1980s — and certain foods, like having cereal for breakfast.
    Which is weird since Gaelic people brought the idea of Halloween over here with them. The modern celebrations with the guising and begging started gaining popularity in the early 1900s so I guess the Irish immigration wave was responsible for that. Cereal popularity started at the same time too, with the rise of health spas in the US at that time. All of that would have ended up being a fad if commercial interests hadn't seized on it as big money makers. I know as a child Halloween was strictly something kids did. Adults put up some paper decorations in their windows and that was about it. Now Halloween products abound, it's a seasonal super industry, and it's celebrated on a large scale like Christmas. In some ways the excesses are more extreme than Christmas as people go crazy making haunted scenes and decorating their front yards. I do confess to liking Halloween better though. It's commercialism is in an excess of creativity that Christmas lacks.



    And there were no ads on the Belgian channels yet in those days, but the Dutch network did have two short advertising blocks before and after the 19:00 news.
    Radio and TV has always been supported by advertising in the US some of which is considered iconic now. Iconic only to be killed off by wokeism like Aunt Jemimah. But the ads kept people from having to pay for subscriptions to television. With the early cable here you paid the subscription but without ads. Now the ads are worse than they ever were when we had analog television. Cable won't last long now with online streaming and I won't be sorry to see it go.


    A typical English breakfast comprises two eggs sunny-side-up, three or four grilled sausages, a stack of toast, jelly, a glass of orange juice and a cup of either coffee or tea — I suspect the coffee was just because we were foreigners, because the British prefer tea. And they also never put lemon in their tea, but instead they add milk — naturally, you cannot have both at the same time because the lemon would spoil the milk in a second.

    The idea of this big breakfast is that the English consider breakfast to be the most important meal of the day, as it has to give you the calories that you will be burning throughout the rest of the day. Conversely, the French petit déjeuner falls more in line with those people whose stomach needs a longer time to wake up in the morning — some people even skip breakfast altogether for that reason and will simply settle for a cup of coffee in the morning.
    That is the idealized American Breakfast. The Southern variety would be the same without orange juice and with the addition of biscuits and gravy or grits and maybe some sausage along with the bacon. Either are necessary for good breakfast gravy. Which is way different than dinner or gravy for roasts. Americans adopted the idea it's the most important meal of the day but more people are getting away from the notion with their Keto dieting and periodic fasting. My family was all for the huge breakfasts but they lived on farms and did farm work. People continued eating like that but weren't doing labor intensive work anymore and that's when health problems set in.

    Tea is not huge here like in the UK but huge in other ways. Herbal teas primarily or health teas. America has that reputation for excess and obesity but its hugely health conscious as well. Lemon is usually relegated to Iced Tea which I understand is not popular anywhere but is sold everywhere in the US. Icing everything I think that has more to do with climate than anywhere else. Even the northern parts of the continental US get very hot and humid in the summer.



    you may remember from a still relatively recent post of mine regarding Belgium's past as an officially francophone country in spite of the fact that some 65% of the Belgian population speaks Dutch and only some 32% speaks French, when the US American and Canadian soldiers arrived here in Belgium at the end of World War I, they were being served French fries — which the British call potato chips — at the restaurants that had survived the bombardments. But because the bourgeoisie all spoke French and regarded Dutch as "a peasant's tongue", those American soldiers actually thought they were in France. And so they took the recipe back home with them as "French fries".

    Mystery solved! The French always snarled and said they had nothing do with French fries but someone had to be. That makes perfect sense. Fried Chicken is a considered a hugely American meal, with most people placing it as Black cuisine and soul food and the woke crying that its slavery food but it's my understanding it originated in Bavaria. Most of the areas in the US that have been settled by dense populations of people from Germany and Bavaria have outstanding outlets for fried chicken and famous chicken dinners.

    I guess that makes us Belgians partly responsible for the existence of McDonald's, but okay...
    We can blame you for Waffle House too?

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    When it comes to culture wars especially in US, it's just a big distraction.
    "The more I see, the less I know for sure." ~ John Lennon

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    Another culture war fought in the media and emulated by the mass produced idiots of this generation: The woke vs the Boomers. Boomers are a despised lot and the reason the America is not a cozy nest of wokeism--hot cocoa and crayons--all day long. Boomers could purchase houses and have single incomes and live well without a college education and the woke are furious at them for destroying everything. All that is wrong with America today is because of Boomers. They are an ill defined lot too. Boomers are of course post war babies, that arrived from 1945 ish to about 1964.

    To the woke, a boomer is anyone who is vaguely old that you disagree with. They are bordering on a social injustice like a racist or Nazi. If the trend continues we will be euthanatizing anyone vaguely old in the near future because they are eating cottage cheese and pears. Or wearing shorts that are too long.

    Most of the angst is directed at superficial stuff--food and clothing. Not philosophy or ideals or actuations, but where the woke mind rest mosts--superficial shit. You may notice plenty of the shit the woke are petulant about are Depression area things, nothing to do with post WW2 baby boomers. Or contrivances of the 1950s when boomers were too young to influence society or not even born yet. So you'd have to say most of these are things that BOOMERS grew up but were not responsible for.


    This is less about food and gives you an idea how they think. I don't know anyone over the age of 25 who eats canned spaghetti and certainly not anyone that would be of grand parental or boomer age. It was always a food targeted at kids and convenient for college students. I doubt anyone picks up any of this stuff like a bologna sandwich or a can of soup and thinks "this is cool". It's not how the boomers think, its how the woke think. Most of this shit is made up in their head and is a projection.

    Apparently food is supposed to change as quickly as woke fads and when they linger because someone likes the taste of it or considers it comfort food, then something is wrong with society.

    I am not sure if this is a US phenom or it happens anywhere the woke appear to try to ruin literally everything.


    I'm not sure if this was a cultural or economic thing but me and my siblings were given chocolate cake hot from the oven with butter spread on top. It was awesome and I still make frostingless cakes today. Or the height of decadence when we happened to have white sugar in the house and a parental unit wasn't looking. Butter spread on bread and sprinkled with sugar. I don't do that anymore but I wish I did. Or we'd steal food and cook it outside. Those ghastly refrigerator bisquits (scones) that pop when you open the canister? We'd wrap them around twigs and toast over a fire then squirt butter and jelly down the hole left from the twig. Or fry eggs in a paper bags over hot flames. The egss always tasted like brown paper bag. This allowed us to live outdoors all day long without ever going home until evening.

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    Quote Originally posted by Diabolical Boids View Post
    Another culture war fought in the media and emulated by the mass produced idiots of this generation: The woke vs the Boomers. Boomers are a despised lot and the reason the America is not a cozy nest of wokeism--hot cocoa and crayons--all day long. Boomers could purchase houses and have single incomes and live well without a college education and the woke are furious at them for destroying everything. All that is wrong with America today is because of Boomers. They are an ill defined lot too. Boomers are of course post war babies, that arrived from 1945 ish to about 1964.
    Well, this is another example of how we are pitted against one another through the endless culture wars.

    It's ridiculous to blame boomers because they were able to afford a new house, car, and yearly vacation on a single income, as they just had the luck of being at the right place at the right time post WW2 as a good bit of the world competition lay in ruin.

    And it's ridiculous for the boomers to consider every kid today as being some woke punk, just as not every kid in the 60's was a hippie. There's nothing wrong with kids born at any time, and the kids today don't have a lot to look forward to as their grandparents and great grandparents had. They're facing a deck stacked more and more against them.

    These distant generations could learn a lot from each other, just as we all can from each other, but that would promote a more profound and cohesive society - that kind of thing is soundly discouraged at every turn.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.

    Socrates

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