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Thread: Coronavirus with an R0 of 3 or beyond

  1. #871
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    Lol, NAP. Just as long as you're not still on them.

    IMO, Trump should not be out on the campaign trail while on these medications. He could make himself worse. Or he might just keep demanding they give him the steroids.

    He demonstrates that he will not even listen to the experts who are his doctors.

    I'm still mind-blown by hearing Dr. Connelly say that they're not going to look at the past regarding Covid tests or the state of Trump's lungs.

    Seriously? Not looking a the patient's history?


    This is doctoring 101. And to see the President's doctor say that to the world, it's seriously fecked up.

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    From a front line health care worker:

    I am an RN, BSN, CCRN with over 10 years clinical experience in CCU/ICU. I care for the critically ill and those seriously injured, I am familiar with death and dying. Since the pandemic started, I have worked in a COVID CCU. Dying there is very different from the hospital deaths I have experienced in the past. There are no family, friends, or loved ones there to support the patient or each other during the patient’s final journey. There is no religious leader to lead prayers or recite scripture. Just an RN in their PAPR, kitted out in full PPE. Sometimes that nurse is me. I hold my patient’s hand in mine and a phone with the other so their families can say goodbye. I turn the sound off the sound on the monitors so there is silence. As death draws nearer, I can feel the body heat leave their hands as their fingers turn blue. When that last spark of life leaves and the lines on the monitor go flat, it is profound. I note the time of death and begin packaging my patient for transport to the morgue. Nurses need to remain professional but in the privacy of my patient’s AIIR, I do sometimes cry and pray, the 23rd psalm. I am a CCU/ICU nurse, I care for the sick and sometimes the dying, it’s what I do and who I am
    But hey, don't let it dominate you. Besides, if you die, you don't have to worry anymore. Right?

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    What? Active censorship? From the White House?

    As Cenk would say, "Of Couurrrrrrse!"

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    This is a Commune newsletter that I got and felt like sharing it as they're words of wisdom.

    The 'Rona

    In mid-February 2020, my friend Russell and I attended a conference called The Conscious Life Expo. The twisted irony of the name will whistle out the kettle in a moment.

    The event was hosted at the LAX Hilton, a nondescript concrete behemoth beside the Los Angeles airport. Behind the banal façade, like a technicolor pearl in an oyster, an animated psychedelia awaited.

    As we entered through the sliding glass, the scene was like a new age rendition of the Star Wars cantina bar. Hundreds of henna-tattooed droids and crystal-necklaced wookies sipped Starbucks’ dark roast while lathering on essential oils. Dread-locked hippies twirled to the wails of Waheguru in front of a makeshift stage in the marble lobby.

    Russell is tall and, candidly, famous so we donned our hoods, like two Jawas, and surreptitiously slinked around the periphery of the mayhem.

    We slithered up the stairs and into the entrails of the marketplace as if performing a spiritual colonoscopy of the conference center. The bazaar was sardined with every sort of mystic, sage and seeker hocking their wares; dreamcatchers and didgeridoos, palo santo and hemp leggings, books on finding yourself and others on losing yourself. Apparently, black tourmaline sends energy down through the root chakra and out the earth star chakra beneath your feet. Who knew?

    The jammed hallways, the dropped cottage cheese ceiling and Russell’s height coalesced into panic-inducing claustrophobia like we were on Malkovich’s seventh-and-a-half floor. Finally, we were squirted into the world’s most diminutive conference room where Russell was booked to speak.

    People swarmed in. Extra chairs were filled as quickly as they were added. A bejeweled lady with purple hair snuggled in next to me and produced not one, but two small parakeets from her satchel, each balanced on a shoulder. I’m not kidding you. In a Hilton!

    As people waited for Russell, it felt like a plane taxiing to the runway, revving for lift-off. Attendees began coughing like an orchestra tuning up before the concert, high-pitched short hacks coming from the piccolo, low resonant croaks from the bassoon. A cosmic pestilence filled the air like a fog machine.

    Russell dazzled as per usual, gave me a look, and from the petri dish we squiggled. It was as if the Expo sneezed and propelled us like droplets out the mouth of the sliding doors and back into dull care. I’d never been happier to see a banker in a pin-striped suit hailing an Uber.

    Knackered, I trudged home and went immediately to sleep.

    I woke up the next day, a Sunday, and felt off. My throat was scratchy and my chest was tight. My condition deteriorated over the course of the day. By Monday, I was running 102 and hacking uncontrollably. My body ached like I’d run a marathon. The fatigue was so profound I could only relate it to the feeling I had in the aftermath of the many flights I took from Tokyo to New York. I remained in this acute state of illness for two weeks.

    Through the entirety of March and April, as the family sheltered in place, these symptoms intermittently recurred, albeit less intensely. I’d attempt to take a walk only to turn around a hundred yards out in a clammy sweat and melt back into the puddle of my sheets. Daddy had what little Micah calls “the ‘Rona.”

    I am not exactly Jeff “The Rock” Krasno, but I am healthy. I exercise daily and I eat well. I have none of the comorbidities associated with severe COVID-19 contraction. Despite the propellers of Marine 1 whirring outside my window, I opted for self-treatment over air-lift. Of course, we knew little about this menace in the early Spring so I followed my instincts. I alkalized my body, gargling and drinking an unimaginable amount of apple cider vinegar. I built up my microbiome with probiotic sea plankton and coconut yogurt kefir. I “sweatidated” in the sauna by pouring eucalyptus water on the searing rocks until the air was stoked to 190 degrees and then breathing deeply to the guidance of Mooji, the Jamaican spiritual teacher. I took lypo-spheric vitamin C and vitamin D. I ate clean, didn’t drink alcohol, severely limited my caffeine and got outside when I felt up to it. I slowly crawled my way back into well-being, though my children claim I remain mentally deranged.

    My intention is not to be cheeky, though I suppose the world might benefit from some levity. A truck backed into my immune system and dumped a viral load big enough to mulch a football pitch. I was fortunate to be able to quarantine and have the resources to self-administer myriad if cockamamie treatments. Frontline workers, health care professionals, delivery drivers, grocery clerks, scientists, meatpackers, government officials and many others could not shelter-in-place. Of those who have gotten sick, many do not have adequate health care or the resources to self-treat as I did. We owe them a great debt. And, to the best estimates, 37 million people have been diagnosed with the disease and over 1 million have died, including parents of good friends.

    If you can remember back to March – and I don’t blame you if you cannot given the successive deluge of world events – you’ll recall how little we knew about the virus. Lying on my bed in my seventh sweat-soaked shirt of the afternoon, my phone abuzz with sensationalism, I had no choice but to lean deeply into my meditation practice or go mad. For two hours a day, I drifted into the emptiness and I am not confident I have completely returned from the void. There appears to be some sort of sacred latency between the happenings of things and my responses to them. These essays have emerged from this uninhabited space as honest attempts to better understand the world more from the perspective of a witness than a participant.

    Standing behind everything that separates us, beneath the various identity costumes we wear, we share a common need for purpose, belonging and well-being. This coronavirus is a barrier between us and our personal and collective health, our ability to connect with those we love and earn a living to support our families.

    Another distant memory is the halcyon moment when we imagined that a global pandemic might unite us, envisioning the virus as blind to race, class and creed. Yet viable solutions to solving the greatest challenge of the last 100 years have been shrouded in a thick political marine layer. And while it’s difficult to navigate true north in a fog, still, we’re all piloting theories. It doesn’t help that our wacky cousin, and other more nefarious characters, are hurling misinformation at us like rotten tomatoes on Facebook. We are doom-scrolling, awash in memes and YouTube videos positing this theory and that.

    Uncertainty is not the friend of the conceptual mind. When the mind cannot know, it will often default to fear over love, to reactivity over responsiveness. How many of us have been living in this exhausted, anxious, agitated, cortisol-fueled state, desperately trying to know the unknowable?

    The invective of politics is so triggering that we lose our capacity for compassion and discernment. It’s preposterous that our political identities have anything to do with an issue as trivial as mask-wearing. Yes, I have read about 20 studies with varying conclusions, but forget this disease even exists for a moment and return to a saner time. When I was a boy, any time I coughed or sneezed, my mum told me to cover my mouth. This was a moral lesson: I shouldn’t spread my germs because I value the health of the people around me. Love thy neighbor. The Golden Rule.

    When we step back from the short-fused political polemic, we often find a simpler moral intuition to guide us. We all need some time to catch our breath.

    Haste and science make cranky bedfellows. Yet politics is stomping its feet for answers now. And, in this demand, science falters and equivocates, further undermining confidence in itself. Vacillations about the nature of COVID’s transmissibility, for example, have confounded and confused. Good science – like good food, wine, yoga, piano playing, athleticism or art – takes time and requires patience. And good science, like those other endeavors, can bring us together. It is in togetherness, in scaled and flexible cooperation, that we achieve the great projects of humanity.

    As fraught as this moment is, it is also pregnant with opportunity. If we could step back from the political precipice and on to the perennial sturdiness of morality and reason, if we could commune around a global collective effort to tame the virus, we could write a new world story.

    This virus appears to be highly transmissible with a relatively low fatality rate. It more severely impacts the elderly and those with comorbidities. This is a more insidious combination than immediately apparent. Higher fatality rates, for instance, might actually staunch the spread, as the virus would incapacitate or kill its hosts with greater frequency and justify more drastic lockdown measures. But, as it is, asymptomatic carriers can bop around and bestow the illness upon the more vulnerable.

    This is where an ethical and moral dilemma surfaces. Many of us have intellectually tangled with the concept of herd immunity, which propagates the idea that we entirely reopen our economies and, in short order, 60% to 70% of the population will have the antibodies and the disease will wither. Of course, we don’t know how close to these percentages we currently are. Knowing, however, that the illness is more fatal among people with heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases, and that these conditions are highly correlated across underprivileged socio-economic (and, by extension, racial) groups, we must honestly face this question: Is it ethical to sacrifice the lives of our disadvantaged and elderly in the pursuit of herd immunity? If so, how many? The virus itself does not discriminate yet it shines a light onto where humans have.

    There may be another way, a middle path. In the short term, we may see significant spikes of cases during the winter in the Northern hemisphere. But, together, we can rally around a number of measures to mitigate spread and fatalities. We can cautiously open sections of the economy and “dance in and dance out.” We can practice common sense public health guidelines, which do not have to be draconian or politicized. Limit large gatherings (80% of the cases come from 10% of people). Practice personal hygiene. Bolster immune systems though public health initiatives. Institute mass testing with rapid response home tests. Where there are outbreak clusters, we tamp down and contact trace.

    There is also reason for optimism on numerous anti-viral fronts. A number of therapeutics including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (which the President received) and convalescent plasma therapy (CPT) are promising treatments. CPT uses blood plasma taken from people who have recovered from COVID-19 which contains antibodies that can recognize and neutralize SARS-CoV-2 as well as other components that may contribute to an immune response. These therapies can be used prophylactically within small circles as “ring vaccination.” For example, if someone within a family or social group contracts the disease, mAbs can be administered to other members within the group.

    These community measures are most likely bridges to a widely distributed vaccine. Currently, there is tremendous public skepticism around a COVID vaccine, with a majority of Americans claiming they would not take it. Much of that skepticism is derived from, again, political pressure that is forcing vaccine developers and the FDA to rush a product to market. The looming election plays a prominent role in the current administration’s Operation Warp Speed initiative. Some urgency is clearly productive and there appears to be significant progress among numerous drugmakers.

    Still, large-scale peer reviewed clinical trials must run their course. The outcomes need to prove beyond any doubt that a vaccine is completely safe. Recently, nine prominent drug makers pledged that they will not submit vaccine candidates for FDA review until their safety and efficacy is shown in large clinical trials. The move is intended to bolster public confidence amid the rush to make a COVID-19 vaccine widely available, and counter fears of political pressure to deliver a vaccine before the November presidential election.

    Skeptics with legitimate concerns will still exist, but if there is a safe vaccine available in the summer 2021, people may slowly shift their attitudes if it means they can see their families and friends, go back to work, travel and go to restaurants. Many may not decide to take the vaccine, but if approximately 70% do elect to accept it, then we may achieve herd immunity.

    This is just a paltry plan from a bloke tapping keys in a guest house. But we do need some blueprint. Otherwise, we’re back at that Hilton Expo, waiting for two ravens to fly past a harvest moon while a crystal refracts the light from the iris of a coyote.

    We can eradicate the virus. And, in doing so, we can accomplish something greater. We can re-establish faith in the best part of the institutions that eliminated smallpox and put a man on the moon. We can eschew odious politics and rally the mighty infrastructure of our government to serve the people. We can move our collective conscious out of the amygdala, the center of fear, and into the pre-frontal cortex where sound judgment is reasoned. We can summon our better angels and grant ourselves and each other some grace. We can honor those who have passed by leveraging this hideous time into a more peaceable and global communion.

    In Gratitude,
    Jeff

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  9. #875
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    Source: Yahoo News


    Blood type may affect severity of COVID-19 infection, new study suggests




    In a new study published Wednesday, researchers in Canada found that, among 95 critically ill COVID-19 patients, 84 percent of those with the blood types A and AB required mechanical ventilation compared to 61 percent of patients with type O or type B, CNN reports. The former group also remained in the intensive care unit for a median of 13.5 days, while the latter's median stay was nine days.

    Dr. Mypinder Sekhon, an intensive care physician at Vancouver General Hospital and the author of the study, said blood type has been "at the back of my mind" when treating patients, but "we need repeated findings across many jurisdictions that show the same thing" before anything definitive is established.

    It's still unclear what may be behind the possible distinction; Sekhon said one explanation could be that people with blood type O are less prone to blood clotting, which can often lead to more severe cases.

    Either way, Sekhon doesn't believe blood type will supersede other "risk factors of severity" like age or comorbidities, and he said people should not behave differently based on their group. "If one is blood group A, you don't need to start panicking," he said. "And if you're blood group O, you're not free to go to the pubs and bars."

    Read more at CNN.


    Source: Yahoo News





    Below is the CNN article referenced in the article above.


    Source: CNN


    People with blood type O may have lower risk of Covid-19 infection and severe illness, two new studies suggest


    (CNN) — People with blood type O may be less vulnerable to Covid-19 and have a reduced likelihood of getting severely ill, according to two studies published Wednesday. Experts say more research is needed.

    The research provides further evidence that blood type (also known as blood group) may play a role in a person's susceptibility to infection and their chance of having a severe bout of the disease. The reasons for this link aren't clear and more research is needed to say what implications, if any, it has for patients.


    Studies add to growing evidence

    A Danish study found that among 7,422 people who tested positive for Covid-19, only 38.4% were blood type O -- even though, among a group of 2.2 million people who were not tested, that blood type made up 41.7% of the population.

    By contrast, 44.4% of group A tested positive, while in the wider Danish population that blood type makes up 42.4%.

    In the other study, researchers in Canada found that among 95 patients critically ill with Covid-19, a higher proportion with blood type A or AB -- 84% -- required mechanical ventilation compared with patients with blood group O or B, which was 61%.

    The Canadian study also found those with blood type A or AB had a longer stay in the intensive care unit, a median of 13.5 days, compared with those with blood group O or B, who had a median of nine days.

    "As a clinician ... it is at the back of my mind when I look at patients and stratify them. But in terms of a definitive marker we need repeated findings across many jurisdictions that show the same thing," said Dr. Mypinder Sekhon, an intensive care physician at Vancouver General Hospital and an author of the Canadian study.

    "I don't think this supersedes other risk factors of severity like age and co-morbities and so forth," added Sekhon, who is also a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Critical Care Medicine and Department of Medicine at the University of British Columbia.

    "If one is blood group A, you don't need to start panicking. And if you're blood group O, you're not free to go to the pubs and bars."


    No need to worry

    Most humans fall into one of four blood groups: A, B, AB or O. In the United States, the most common blood groups are O and A.

    It makes very little difference to most people's daily lives unless you have to have a blood transfusion. Nor should people worry unduly about the link between blood type and Covid-19, said Dr. Torben Barington, the senior author of the Danish paper and a clinical professor at Odense University Hospital and the University of Southern Denmark.

    "We do not know whether this is some kind of protection of group O, or whether it's some kind of vulnerability in the other blood groups," he said.

    "I think this has scientific interest, and when we find out what the mechanism is, perhaps we're able to use that proactively in some way in regard to treatment."

    n the Danish study, researchers analyzed data on Danish individuals who were tested between February 27 and July 30, and the distribution of blood types among those people was compared with data from people who had not been tested. They found that blood group wasn't a risk factor for hospitalization or death from Covid-19.

    Both studies were published in the journal Blood Advances.

    While there are several theories, researchers don't yet know what mechanism could explain the link between different blood groups and Covid-19.

    Sekhon said it could be explained by people with blood type O having less of a key clotting factor making them less prone to coagulation problems in the blood. Clotting has been a major driver of the severity of Covid-19.

    Other possible explanations involve blood group antigens and how they affect the production of infection fighting antibodies. Or it could be linked to genes associated with blood types and their effect on receptors in the immune system.

    "It's a repeated, interesting scientific observation that really warrants further mechanistic work," he said.


    'Important research question'

    The findings of the two new studies provide "more converging evidence that blood type may play a role in a person's susceptibility to Covid infection and their chance of having a severe bout of Covid-19," said Dr. Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security in Baltimore, who was not involved in either of the studies.

    A separate study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in June, found genetic data in some Covid-19 patients and healthy people suggesting that those with Type A blood had a higher risk of becoming infected, and those with type O blood were at a lower risk.

    That previous genetic study, paired with the two new studies in Blood Advances, are "suggestive that this is a real phenomenon that we're seeing," said Adalja, whose work is focused on emerging infectious disease.

    "While we're not quite to the point where this is ironclad, it's clearly suggestive, and we have not seen anything inconsistent with this. The same pattern has been emerging with O blood type tending to be the one that's standing out," Adalja said.

    Adalja said that blood types and their susceptibility to various infections have been studied in the medical literature before. For instance, research suggests that people with blood type O appear to be more susceptible to norovirus infection.

    As for the novel coronavirus that causes Covid-19, "We need to figure out the mechanism and understand it at the molecular level to be able to say for sure how this is occurring -- that this is really the O blood type and not something that kind of tracks with O blood type," Adalja said.

    We're starting to see enough now that I think it's an important research question to answer," he said. "There's more science to be done here, but it seems to me that there's more evidence accumulating for this hypothesis."


    Source: CNN


    The two studies were published in the journal Blood Advances.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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  11. #876
    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    Aragorn, I knew you were going to jump on that story ...

    30 years ago, blood type O was considered dominant among the American Indigenous, almost 100% ... spelled protected against covid. Europeans are the groups that spread blood type A and Asians blood type B. the most vulnerable are now considered A and AB. It still doesn't explain the Hispanic high death toll. I believe it has to be cultural conditions. African Americans are commonly A blood types ... just as common as A is with Europeans. I'm A- ... that makes me special, I am Invulnerable, me and Superman, as long as there is no Kryptonite around.

    But seriously folks, ok maybe not really ... According to genetic analysis, I have inherited Neanderthal variants that provide a heightened immunity against viruses ... really ... ???!?
    “If you cannot do great things, do small things in a great way.”

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    Administrator Aragorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    Aragorn, I knew you were going to jump on that story ...
    My interest in this matter is nothing out of the ordinary ─ I have neither an obsession with Covid-19, nor with blood types or genetics. The Yahoo article was mentioned at Slashdot, and I considered it an important enough discovery for me to want to to look at the article and add it to this thread, which I consider a centralized repository for anything Covid-19-related.

    For that matter, I know that Bill Ryan of Project Avalon also takes an interest in this disease ─ like myself, he is interested in the science, and he has himself also contracted Covid-19 earlier this year ─ and I've sent him a copy, which he has immediately posted over at his forum.

    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    30 years ago, blood type O was considered dominant among the American Indigenous, almost 100% ... spelled protected against covid. Europeans are the groups that spread blood type A and Asians blood type B. the most vulnerable are now considered A and AB. It still doesn't explain the Hispanic high death toll. I believe it has to be cultural conditions. African Americans are commonly A blood types ... just as common as A is with Europeans. I'm A- ... that makes me special, I am Invulnerable, me and Superman, as long as there is no Kryptonite around.

    But seriously folks, ok maybe not really ... According to genetic analysis, I have inherited Neanderthal variants that provide a heightened immunity against viruses ... really ... ???!?
    Just for the record, having blood type O does not protect you from getting the virus. I have type O+ blood, and I've had Covid-19 twice already now. However ─ and this is where the difference with the other blood types comes into play ─ I have not needed to go to hospital, let alone be connected to a respirator.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    which is a good thing obviously... statistics and science ... it's surely interesting. I confess I live in fear of the dreaded nothingness, anxiety related to illness. My adoptive mother died when I was five, I went unsupported through a 'near' heart dysfunction when I was 13 and was later told there was 'fear' about my potential condition. It left me traumatized (that's my self-analysis). So, statistical illness is frightening to me and many others I suspect. I think I'll bury my head in the sand.
    “If you cannot do great things, do small things in a great way.”

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    Quote Originally posted by Aragorn View Post
    I have type O+ blood
    Me too and I don't know if I've had corona because I haven't gone to the test and it could be just a seasonal flu, but this year I've been way more sick than usual. Even now I am feverish and ever since July I have had this virus in my system. At times it reactivates and some days have been fine, before that I had a short flu in April if I remember correctly. Normally I am sick once or twice per year and I don't even always get the fever, usually those last maybe two weeks at a time. This has been going on for weeks and weeks now.

    It hasn't been so bad that I would have needed to go to hospital or anything like that, I just really lack the energy for anything. Back in February 2016 I got a real bad case of influenza and then I was so sick that I was bed-bound for almost a month. I can't describe even what kind of a infernal agony that was so compared to that this is still almost nothing even though it's been bothersome because it has been lasting for so long.

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    Could copper help fight COVID-19? Three lessons from Chile

    I heard about this on the Norwegian news. A Copper-mining town, Røros did not have anybody infected for a long while...well two arrived with the infection, but are now recovering.

    Copper is one of the world’s most effective virus-killing materials, and could become a powerful ally in beating the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The virus has been found to survive only four hours on copper, but up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel. In Chile, the world’s biggest copper producer, the metal’s antiviral properties have long been known. Chilean entrepreneurs have even used copper to develop an antimicrobial material for 3D printing, with many potential applications in healthcare. Now copper could not only transform the global struggle to end the pandemic. It could also change how countries use their natural resources as drivers of innovation and progress.
    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/...ns-from-chile/

    Whatever is true. Whatever is noble. Whatever is right. Whatever is lovely. Whatever is admirable. Anything of excellence and worthy of praise. Dwell on these things. Jesus Christ (I agree)

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    interesting story, Elen: the greatest moderator ever ...
    “If you cannot do great things, do small things in a great way.”

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    Aragorn (17th October 2020), Dreamtimer (17th October 2020), Elen (17th October 2020), Wind (18th October 2020)

  23. #882
    Super Moderator Norway Elen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    interesting story, Elen: the greatest moderator ever ...
    Not so true...you make me blush...
    Whatever is true. Whatever is noble. Whatever is right. Whatever is lovely. Whatever is admirable. Anything of excellence and worthy of praise. Dwell on these things. Jesus Christ (I agree)

  24. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Elen For This Useful Post:

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