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Thread: Pharaoh Ramesses III

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    Pharaoh Ramesses III

    Ain't nobody got nuthin' on me. Things are gonna change around here. I'm related to Pharaoh Ramesses III. So tread around me with care.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Administrator Aragorn's Avatar
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    Thread moved to Off-Topic.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    what...that's imporatant anthropological information...c'mon man...

    it was a silly start Aragorn, but I thought others might be able to contribute something of more substance...perhaps if you feel that it is off topic we should just delete it because it won't go anywhere serious... I"m cool with that...
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Administrator Aragorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    what...that's imporatant anthropological information...c'mon man...

    it was a silly start Aragorn, but I thought others might be able to contribute something of more substance...perhaps if you feel that it is off topic we should just delete it because it won't go anywhere serious... I"m cool with that...
    Hmmm... Let's see where it goes. We can all use a bit of lighthearted fun around here after all the drama of the past couple of days.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    Here's the story:

    Paternal Haplogroup lineage:

    A
    275,000 Years Ago

    DE-M145
    76,000 Years Ago

    E-M96
    73,000 Years Ago

    Haplogroup A 275,000 Years Ago

    The stories of all of our paternal lines can be traced back over 275,000 years to just one man: the common ancestor of haplogroup A. Current evidence suggests he was one of thousands of men who lived in eastern Africa at the time. However, while his male-line descendants passed down their Y chromosomes generation after generation, the lineages from the other men died out. Over time his lineage alone gave rise to all other haplogroups that exist today.


    E-M180 17,000 Years Ago

    Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup E-M180

    Your paternal line stems from the E-M180 branch of E, which dominates south of the Sahara. The haplogroup originated about 17,000 years ago in the pockets of western Africa that were habitable at the time, when much of the continent was extremely dry due to Ice Age climate conditions.Over ten thousand years later, men bearing haplogroup E-M180 migrated throughout sub-Saharan Africa, spurred by the development of agriculture and iron-working in the region.

    E-M4254 12,000 Years Ago

    Your paternal haplogroup, E-M4254, traces back to a man who lived approximately 12,000 years ago.
    That's nearly 480.0 generations ago! What happened between then and now? As researchers and citizen scientists discover more about your haplogroup, new details may be added to the story of your paternal line.

    E-M4254 Today

    E-M4254 is relatively common.

    Today, you share your haplogroup with all the men who are paternal-line descendants of the common ancestor of E-M4254.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    The Rest of the Story

    Maternal Haplogroup lineage

    L 180,000 Years Ago

    L 3 65,000 Years Ago

    N 59,000 Years Ago

    R 57,000 Years Ago

    U 47,000 Years Ago

    K 27,000 Years Ago

    Haplogroup L 180,000 Years Ago

    If every person living today could trace his or her maternal line back over thousands of generations, all of our lines would meet at a single woman who lived in eastern Africa between 150,000 and 200,000 years ago. Though she was one of perhaps thousands of women alive at the time, only the diverse branches of her haplogroup have survived to today. The story of your maternal line begins with her.


    K1a1b1a 5,000 Years Ago

    Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup K1a1b1a
    Your maternal line stems from a branch of haplogroup K called K1, a maternal lineage that arose during the peak of the Ice Age in the Middle East and was carried to the west when the climate began to warm. The K1a1b1a lineage traces back to a woman who lived approximately 4,500 years ago, most likely within Europe. Women carrying this haplogroup were most likely among the maternal founders of the Ashkenazi Jewish population in eastern and central Europe 2,000 years later, and the main branch of the haplogroup is now found almost exclusively amongst their descendants.

    Today, K1a1b1a accounts for 20% of all maternal haplogroups in the Ashkenazim. This proportion rises to nearly 50% in Ashkenazi Jews from western and central Europe. K1a1b1a can also be found at low levels in Sephardic Jews and in non-Jewish central and eastern Europeans.

    K1a1b1a Today

    Today, you share your haplogroup with all the maternal-line descendants of the common ancestor of K1a1b1a
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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