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Thread: Pharaoh Ramesses III

  1. #16
    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    A Different Take: I can't stay to topic on my own serious thread here...

    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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  3. #17
    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    Another insight here is that immigrant cultures maintain their culture and language at home to preserve it. Speaking English outside of the home is a sort of a barrier to their personal and private lives.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Administrator Aragorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    Another insight here is that immigrant cultures maintain their culture and language at home to preserve it. Speaking English outside of the home is a sort of a barrier to their personal and private lives.
    We see the same thing over here among Arabic (and in Belgium, predominantly Moroccan) immigrants, and with their second- and third-generation descendants who were born here. They will also (almost) exclusively marry another Muslim, and for that matter, of the same ethnicity. It doesn't happen very often that a Turkish immigrant (or a descendant thereof) will marry a Moroccan immigrant (or a descendant thereof). But then again, many Islamic cultures usually feature pre-arranged marriages, and especially for girls. Boys are somewhat freer to choose and will as such be able to more easily get out from underneath a pre-arranged marriage.

    Those who do not follow these practices are the more progressive ones. Their women also don't cover their heads anymore, even though they are usually still Muslim at heart. But it's rare, in part because many of the progressive Arabic or Turkish people here fear the reactions of the more conservative ones, who make up for the vast majority.

    I've known a Moroccan girl who was quite emancipated, and for a while she was even married to a guy whom I knew from school ─ he was a thoroughbred Flemish guy. The girl didn't cover her head and I don't think she was still a Muslim either, but she was terrified of the idea that another Moroccan would catch her while she was smoking a cigarette. That was absolutely taboo among their culture.

    Their marriage didn't last very long, though. The guy was cheating on her ─ and with more than one woman too ─ and he forced his wife to have an abortion when she got pregnant,. Eventually they got a divorce. He's an alcoholic now. It's a pity how he threw his life away, because he was a very smart guy, and he even held a fairly high position at a company at some point. But he liked partying too much.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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  7. #19
    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    ouch, yeah that is painful for sure... and all too typical in all regards.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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  9. #20
    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
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    I recall the tobacco thing in Tunisia. Only men in the smoking gardens. Women never smoked in public. There were some who would do so in private but none in the family I stayed with.

    I met a young man from Morocco several years later and he told me that the shisha that they smoked out of the hookas was not just tobacco, but had hashish mixed in.

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  11. #21
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    Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color. Researchers identified genes related to melanin levels in African populations. Oct 12, 2017



    A genome-wide association study published today (October 12) in Science has revealed several genetic variants associated with skin color in African populations.

    Despite the emphasis that humans have placed on skin color throughout history, little is known about its genetic basis. As The New York Times reports, most of what scientists knew of skin-color genetics came from studies of European populations, which found that mutations in the gene SLC24A5 caused cells to make less pigment, resulting in paler skin. Most Europeans have the same variant for that gene.

    That “gives you a very incomplete perspective,” University of Pennsylvania geneticist Sarah Tishkoff, who led the new work, tells The Atlantic.

    To learn more about the genetics of skin color, Tishkoff and her collaborators went to Africa, where skin color varies widely. “Africa is not some homogenous [sic] place where everyone has dark skin,” Tishkoff tells The Atlantic. “There’s huge variation.”

    The researchers measured light reflectance from the skin, a proxy for pigment levels, in 2,092 people in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Botswana. They then genotyped 1,570 of those individuals for more than 4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome.

    Tishkoff’s group identified four genomic regions where genetic variation was associated with skin color. Sequence differences at these loci account for about 29 percent of the observed variation in pigmentation, according to the study. Within those regions, the researchers focused on six genes tied to pigmentation: SLC24A5, MFSD12, DDB1, TMEM138, OCA2, and HERC2.

    For instance, study participants with the darkest skin were more likely to have variations in MFSD12 that lead to reduced gene expression. According to Science’s news report, “These variants arose about a half-million years ago, suggesting that human ancestors before that time may have had moderately dark skin, rather than the deep black hue created today by these mutations.”

    According to what The Atlantic calls the “traditonal evolutionary story of human skin,” early humans in Africa had dark skin to protect themselves from ultraviolet radiation, and that when they migrated away from the Equator to less sunny regions, they evolved lighter skin to continue to produce vitamin D despite the lack of sun. But Tishkoff’s team identified variants leading to light skin and variants causing dark skin, both of which they think originated in African populations. Sometimes, the older variant led to lighter skin, countering the idea that the original Africans were all dark-skinned.

    In the case of SLC24A5, Tishkoff’s study found that the gene variant associated with light skin is commonly present in East Africans. Yet, having this variant does not necessitate having light skin, likely because multiple genes interact to determine skin color, Tishkoff tells Science. Another twist to this gene’s story is that this gene variant likely came to Africa from the Middle East, Tishkoff tells Science.

    An alternative hypothesis to the evolution of skin tone is that people may have independently evolved dark skin in different parts of the world depending on the sunlight they received. But according to the study, “the dark-skinned people of southern India, Australia and New Guinea, for example, did not independently evolve their color simply because evolution favored it. They inherited the ancestral dark variants Dr. Tishkoff’s team found in Africans,” the Times reports.

    The study furnishes “a deeper appreciation of the genetic palette that has been mixed and matched through evolution,” University of Pennsylvania anthropologist and skin-color expert Nina Jablonski tells the Times.
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    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
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    There was likely a time when dark skin was the thing everyone liked.

    I can relate in terms of getting a tan. I can't get a good tan, and a lot of colors look like crap on me. A little more skin tone would be a good thing, not a bad one.

    If I lived around bronze colored folks I'd probably thing my pink, freckled skin was the ugliest thing ever. But I don't, and most folks think my skin is just fine.

    I prefer brown eyes.

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    I've always loved freckles...my adoptive mother and aunt were both heavily freckled. Actually, coincidentally I suppose, I am too. Maybe a nature vs nurture thing...or perhaps epigenetics.

    I had a very common law wife for about 10 years...red hair and freckles... 10 years of total misery...

    The above article states that the gene expression blocks yellow pigment which lightens the skin tone and that is common in Europe. Another article I read stated that with hair, dark pigment is less adaptive. Shave a chimpanzee and light skin is what we'll see...So the initial expression was of 'darkening' skin but not of necessity black. The light color gene first developed in Africa and then later adaptations took over in Europe and Africa, as well as the rest of the world.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    When I 'tan' it's a golden yellow color. Never brown.

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  19. #25
    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    you're golden...
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Another reason why the right and alt-right are resistant to the notion of global warming has occurred to me. It's a genetic fear...more heat means darker skin. I know, I know, that doesn't make any sense but since when has gene expression made any sense to the palpitating brain.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    Another reason why the right and alt-right are resistant to the notion of global warming has occurred to me. It's a genetic fear...more heat means darker skin. I know, I know, that doesn't make any sense but since when has gene expression made any sense to the palpitating brain.
    As crazy as that sounds, I think you might be onto something there, because a still fairly recent study has shown that the brain structure of people with ─ shall we say ─ more conservative political leanings appears to differ from that of people with more progressive political leanings. The latter appear to be more adaptive to their changing environment, whereas the former have greater difficulty adapting. So there may be a genetic factor involved, which then ultimately manifests as a neuro-psychological difference.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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  25. #28
    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    well, I hate to say it, but...Amen, brother...
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    This is a brilliant presentation on true health benefits and costs of skin color.

    And the tail end of this presentation she cites studies that natural selection studies indicate a developing greater range of skin color phenotypes actually favoring lighter pigmentation. I think I understand the 'magical' quality that was discussed earlier...Scientifically, it's called 'The Vitamin D Compromise'. A lighter skin pigmentation has biological advantages in its ability to synthesize UV rays for vitamin D production which facilitates the production of follate for energy and biological reproduction. It provides a biological directive (strong bias towards natural selection).

    The Cost of Color: The Health and Social Consequences of Skin Color for People Today
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