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  1. #286
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    The infidels of the Hindu Kush | DW Documentary

    The ancient culture of the Kalash people is threatened. Almost 4,000 still live at the foot of the Himalayas between Pakistan and Afghanistan. But modern life is making inroads here, too.

    Legend says the Kalash are descendants of Greek troops who settled here during the campaigns of Alexander the Great. But the tale is debatable. DNA researchers suspect they originated in Afghanistan, but the Kalash cling to the story, saying they are of western and European appearance. Over the course of history, most of them were forcibly converted to Islam or killed. A small part of the community, however, survived in the Pakistani province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. They are polytheists and live in a very traditional way, far from the modern, big cities. The younger generation often has to decide whether to stick to tradition or pursue a modern life. Many are engaged in a balancing act between the desire to maintain their culture and religion and the opportunity to move beyond the limited opportunities of their home villages. This film asks the Kalash how they see the future of their traditions. Will they be able to maintain them?

    May 12, 2020

    42:26 minutes


    Last edited by giovonni, 14th May 2020 at 03:20.

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  3. #287
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    A look back into ...

    The Black Death in Venice
    and the Dawn of Quarantine


    Archaeological research is unearthing how the
    Italian city created a vast public health response
    700 years ago.


    by Sara Toth Stub
    May 11, 2020


    An aerial view of the lagoon of Venice

    Just beyond the shores of Venice proper—a city that comprises dozens of islands—lie two uninhabited isles with a rich history. Today these landmasses are landscapes of grasses, trees, and worn stone buildings. But once they were among the most important gateways to this storied trading city.

    The islands, known as Lazzaretto Vecchio and Lazzaretto Nuovo, are now yielding fascinating insights into Venice’s response to one of the most famous pandemics in history. In the mid-14th century, Venice was struck by the bubonic plague, part of an outbreak known as the Black Death that may have killed up to 25 million people, or one-third of the population, in Europe. This spread was just one of several waves of the plague to strike Northern Italy in the centuries that followed.

    Venice, as a trading center, was especially vulnerable. “They saw that the only solution was to separate people, to take away the sick people, or suspected sick people,” says Francesca Malagnini, of the University for Foreigners, Perugia, who is herself a Venetian, linguist, and member of an interdisciplinary team researching Lazzaretto Nuovo. “This was the only way to protect everyone’s health and allow the economy to continue.”

    Beginning in the early-15th century, the island of Lazzaretto Vecchio was designated for isolating and treating plague-stricken Venetians. Later, Lazzaretto Nuovo became a spot where ships coming from places experiencing the plague, or those with suspected sick passengers or crew, anchored. There, people and goods spent a period of quarantine before being allowed into the heart of the city. (We owe the English word “quarantine” to the Italian term for 40 days, quaranta giorni.)


    The island of Lazzaretto Nuovo, shown here, was one of the isles where the city of Venice quarantined plague-stricken individuals.

    Together, these islands were at the center of Venice’s vast public health response to the plague. Building on earlier traditions of separating the sick from the healthy, the Venetian government became the first in the Mediterranean region to systematically use large-scale methods of isolation and information-collecting to monitor and fight infectious diseases.

    The effort was even more impressive given that science then could not explain how diseases spread. A germ theory of disease would not exist for another 400 years.

    Today, as much of the world finds itself under various quarantine, isolation, and stay-at-home orders and facing uncertainty related to the COVID-19 pandemic, Venice’s quarantine history and the archaeology of isolation hospitals is especially relevant. Researchers’ findings echo many modern experiences—particularly where public health, policy, and economics intersect.

    “Public health has always been about more than medicine.”

    Venice’s municipal records have long preserved the story of the Lazzaretto islands. In 1423, the government established what later was called Lazzaretto Vecchio to house people who had the plague, and in 1468, a government decree dedicated a second island—then home to a monastery—to a new isolation hospital, literally, “Lazzaretto Nuovo.”

    Vecchio offers archaeologists a handful of buildings to study. They reveal that the island was a treatment base for infected patients. There, doctors, wearing the elaborate beak-like plague masks of the period, did their best to treat the disease.

    Few structures remain on Nuovo. Historical records, however, suggest Nuovo consisted of warehouses for goods, along with more than 100 rooms to quarantine sailors and crews before allowing them into Venice. A 16th-century historian, Francesco Sansovino, wrote that Nuovo’s buildings had “the semblance of a castle.”


    An archival illustration of Lazzaretto Novo.

    The largest warehouse, or Tezon Grande, still stands: a long rectangular brick building lined with arched doorways and topped by a vaulted roof. According to historical records, a team of armed guards and porters worked to unload ships’ cargo into this space. “They were working hard and also risking their lives to protect the health of the city,” says Malagnini.

    This team followed specific protocols for airing out and clearing goods with smoke from aromatic herbs and saltwater. They used vinegar to wash their hands after handling potentially contaminated items.

    “[City officials] knew that trade and the flow of goods was not possible if health was not guaranteed,” explains Daniele Andreozzi, a professor at the University of Trieste who studies ancient port cities.

    While it operated, the Venetian system involved hundreds of city officials. Prior to it, community care for the sick was relegated to charity efforts and religious orders.

    It was not a temporary response to disaster but rather a permanent, government-run, continuous monitoring effort that endured until military general Napoleon Bonaparte’s conquest of the region in 1797. And that approach was necessary: The bubonic plague swept Europe repeatedly over the centuries. Milan during the plague of 1630. The plague lasted decades in southern Europe and swept through cities all across the Italian peninsula.


    Milan during the plague of 1630. The plague lasted decades in southern Europe and swept through cities all across the Italian peninsula.

    Despite the city’s vigilance, monitoring the population was difficult. “The plague does not send to warn which ship it arrives on,” wrote an 18th-century Venetian health official. Officials could not check every caravan or smuggler, nor stop all wedding feasts attended by potentially infected people, Andreozzi says.

    In addition, officials did not have deep medical or scientific knowledge of how the plague spread. They had no understanding, for example, of the timeframe between exposure to bacteria and the emergence of symptoms.

    As a result, though some experts believe the system limited the size and frequency of outbreaks, the plague continued to ravage Venice, with outbreaks into at least the 17th century. An especially large episode in 1630 killed approximately one-third of the population in Venice and Bologna.

    Archaeologists are gaining insights into the limits of the Venetian system by studying mass graves on both islands that were discovered in the past two decades. Matteo Borrini, a forensic anthropologist and lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University, has examined and studied about 200 bodies discovered on Nuovo.

    Borrini explains that patients were generally bound for Vecchio. However, the remains on Nuovo reveal that, when the plague did reach the city, Venice became so overwhelmed that medical officials also sent sick people and the bodies of those who had died to Lazzaretto Nuovo. The city of Venice encompasses dozens of distinct islands.


    The city of Venice encompasses dozens of distinct islands.

    The graves on Lazzaretto Nuovo showed signs that they had been reopened multiple times to add bodies, he said, “layering them like a lasagna.” Most significantly, the graves illustrate how the plague spared no one.

    A study of the bones offers clues to the victims’ diets. Some remains came from people who consumed a lot of meat, an option only for wealthy Venetians. Others who died had dined on middle-class fare, rich in fish and vegetables. Still others ate mainly grains, typical among the poor.

    “A pandemic is in many ways really a democratic event,” Borrini says. “Plague could kill anyone, more or less at the same ratio, so, in the cemetery, you also have a perfect picture of Venetian society frozen in that moment.”

    Jane L. Stevens Crawshaw, author of Plague Hospitals: Public Health for the City in Early Modern Venice, notes that Venice’s quarantine history, however flawed, holds enduring lessons. “It shows, then and now, how difficult it is for a cosmopolitan trading center to escape infectious disease,” she says.

    Nonetheless, Venice’s maritime quarantine became a model for other parts of Italy and the world more widely, influencing American lazarettos that quarantined incoming immigrants. Indeed, Crawshaw notes, Venice’s approach was a way for the government to put its citizens at ease.

    “On a deeper level, this really shows how public health has always been about more than medicine. It’s also about politics and economics, and societal benefits, like making people feel safe,” Crawshaw says. “The quarantine system in Venice made the port seem more trustworthy and safe. It looks as though you are taking some responsibility.”



    Doctors treating plague in Venice made use of elaborate beaked masks.



    Source reference links: atlasobscura.com

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    Oldest Footage of London Ever

    Yestervid



    This is the oldest footage of London ever. Includes amazing old footage combined with modern shots of the same location today. Also features maps carefully researched to show where the camera was. Arranged by location, 46 shots of classic footage with a twist and an inspiring soundtrack.

    11:02 minutes



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    Nice. Really like the side-by sides.

    Several vehicles had Lipton Teas emblazoned on the side.

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    Gosh Star Forts and TarTar buildings everywhere with a muddy floody resety eye.


    Quote Originally posted by giovonni View Post
    Oldest Footage of London Ever

    Yestervid




    11:02 minutes



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  11. #291
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by giovonni View Post
    The real Lord of the Flies: what
    happened when six boys were
    shipwrecked for 15 months


    When a group of schoolboys were marooned on an island in 1965, it turned out very differently from William Golding’s bestseller, writes Rutger Bregman


    A still from the 1963 film of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. Photograph: Ronald Grant

    Rutger Bregman

    Sat 9 May 2020
    Last modified on Sun 10 May 2020


    "For centuries western culture has been permeated by the idea that humans are selfish creatures. That cynical image of humanity has been proclaimed in films and novels, history books and scientific research. But in the last 20 years, something extraordinary has happened. Scientists from all over the world have switched to a more hopeful view of mankind. This development is still so young that researchers in different fields often don’t even know about each other.

    When I started writing a book about this more hopeful view, I knew there was one story I would have to address. It takes place on a deserted island somewhere in the Pacific. A plane has just gone down. The only survivors are some British schoolboys, who can’t believe their good fortune. Nothing but beach, shells and water for miles. And better yet: no grownups.

    On the very first day, the boys institute a democracy of sorts. One boy, Ralph, is elected to be the group’s leader. Athletic, charismatic and handsome, his game plan is simple: 1) Have fun. 2) Survive. 3) Make smoke signals for passing ships. Number one is a success. The others? Not so much. The boys are more interested in feasting and frolicking than in tending the fire. Before long, they have begun painting their faces. Casting off their clothes. And they develop overpowering urges – to pinch, to kick, to bite.

    By the time a British naval officer comes ashore, the island is a smouldering wasteland. Three of the children are dead. “I should have thought,” the officer says, “that a pack of British boys would have been able to put up a better show than that.” At this, Ralph bursts into tears. “Ralph wept for the end of innocence,” we read, and for “the darkness of man’s heart”.

    This story never happened. An English schoolmaster, William Golding, made up this story in 1951 – his novel Lord of the Flies would sell tens of millions of copies, be translated into more than 30 languages and hailed as one of the classics of the 20th century. In hindsight, the secret to the book’s success is clear. Golding had a masterful ability to portray the darkest depths of mankind. Of course, he had the zeitgeist of the 1960s on his side, when a new generation was questioning its parents about the atrocities of the second world war. Had Auschwitz been an anomaly, they wanted to know, or is there a Nazi hiding in each of us?

    I first read Lord of the Flies as a teenager. I remember feeling disillusioned afterwards, but not for a second did I think to doubt Golding’s view of human nature. That didn’t happen until years later when I began delving into the author’s life. I learned what an unhappy individual he had been: an alcoholic, prone to depression; a man who beat his kids. “I have always understood the Nazis,” Golding confessed, “because I am of that sort by nature.” And it was “partly out of that sad self-knowledge” that he wrote Lord of the Flies.

    I began to wonder: had anyone ever studied what real children would do if they found themselves alone on a deserted island? I wrote an article on the subject, in which I compared Lord of the Flies to modern scientific insights and concluded that, in all probability, kids would act very differently. Readers responded sceptically. All my examples concerned kids at home, at school, or at summer camp. Thus began my quest for a real-life Lord of the Flies. After trawling the web for a while, I came across an obscure blog that told an arresting story: “One day, in 1977, six boys set out from Tonga on a fishing trip ... Caught in a huge storm, the boys were shipwrecked on a deserted island. What do they do, this little tribe? They made a pact never to quarrel.”

    The article did not provide any sources. But sometimes all it takes is a stroke of luck. Sifting through a newspaper archive one day, I typed a year incorrectly and there it was. The reference to 1977 turned out to have been a typo. In the 6 October 1966 edition of Australian newspaper The Age, a headline jumped out at me: “Sunday showing for Tongan castaways”. The story concerned six boys who had been found three weeks earlier on a rocky islet south of Tonga, an island group in the Pacific Ocean. The boys had been rescued by an Australian sea captain after being marooned on the island of ‘Ata for more than a year. According to the article, the captain had even got a television station to film a re-enactment of the boys’ adventure.

    I was bursting with questions. Were the boys still alive? And could I find the television footage? Most importantly, though, I had a lead: the captain’s name was Peter Warner. When I searched for him, I had another stroke of luck. In a recent issue of a tiny local paper from Mackay, Australia, I came across the headline: “Mates share 50-year bond”. Printed alongside was a small photograph of two men, smiling, one with his arm slung around the other. The article began: “Deep in a banana plantation at Tullera, near Lismore, sit an unlikely pair of mates ... The elder is 83 years old, the son of a wealthy industrialist. The younger, 67, was, literally, a child of nature.” Their names? Peter Warner and Mano Totau. And where had they met? On a deserted island.

    My wife Maartje and I rented a car in Brisbane and some three hours later arrived at our destination, a spot in the middle of nowhere that stumped Google Maps. Yet there he was, sitting out in front of a low-slung house off the dirt road: the man who rescued six lost boys 50 years ago, Captain Peter Warner.

    Peter was the youngest son of Arthur Warner, once one of the richest and most powerful men in Australia. Back in the 1930s, Arthur ruled over a vast empire called Electronic Industries, which dominated the country’s radio market at the time. Peter was groomed to follow in his father’s footsteps. Instead, at the age of 17, he ran away to sea in search of adventure and spent the next few years sailing from Hong Kong to Stockholm, Shanghai to St Petersburg. When he finally returned five years later, the prodigal son proudly presented his father with a Swedish captain’s certificate. Unimpressed, Warner Sr demanded his son learn a useful profession. “What’s easiest?” Peter asked. “Accountancy,” Arthur lied.

    Peter went to work for his father’s company, yet the sea still beckoned, and whenever he could he went to Tasmania, where he kept his own fishing fleet. It was this that brought him to Tonga in the winter of 1966. On the way home he took a little detour and that’s when he saw it: a minuscule island in the azure sea, ‘Ata. The island had been inhabited once, until one dark day in 1863, when a slave ship appeared on the horizon and sailed off with the natives. Since then, ‘Ata had been deserted – cursed and forgotten.

    But Peter noticed something odd. Peering through his binoculars, he saw burned patches on the green cliffs. “In the tropics it’s unusual for fires to start spontaneously,” he told us, a half century later. Then he saw a boy. Naked. Hair down to his shoulders. This wild creature leaped from the cliffside and plunged into the water. Suddenly more boys followed, screaming at the top of their lungs. It didn’t take long for the first boy to reach the boat. “My name is Stephen,” he cried in perfect English. “There are six of us and we reckon we’ve been here 15 months.”

    The boys, once aboard, claimed they were students at a boarding school in Nuku‘alofa, the Tongan capital. Sick of school meals, they had decided to take a fishing boat out one day, only to get caught in a storm. Likely story, Peter thought. Using his two-way radio, he called in to Nuku‘alofa. “I’ve got six kids here,” he told the operator. “Stand by,” came the response. Twenty minutes ticked by. (As Peter tells this part of the story, he gets a little misty-eyed.) Finally, a very tearful operator came on the radio, and said: “You found them! These boys have been given up for dead. Funerals have been held. If it’s them, this is a miracle!”

    In the months that followed I tried to reconstruct as precisely as possible what had happened on ‘Ata. Peter’s memory turned out to be excellent. Even at the age of 90, everything he recounted was consistent with my foremost other source, Mano, 15 years old at the time and now pushing 70, who lived just a few hours’ drive from him. The real Lord of the Flies, Mano told us, began in June 1965. The protagonists were six boys – Sione, Stephen, Kolo, David, Luke and Mano – all pupils at a strict Catholic boarding school in Nuku‘alofa. The oldest was 16, the youngest 13, and they had one main thing in common: they were bored witless. So they came up with a plan to escape: to Fiji, some 500 miles away, or even all the way to New Zealand.

    There was only one obstacle. None of them owned a boat, so they decided to “borrow” one from Mr Taniela Uhila, a fisherman they all disliked. The boys took little time to prepare for the voyage. Two sacks of bananas, a few coconuts and a small gas burner were all the supplies they packed. It didn’t occur to any of them to bring a map, let alone a compass.

    No one noticed the small craft leaving the harbour that evening. Skies were fair; only a mild breeze ruffled the calm sea. But that night the boys made a grave error. They fell asleep. A few hours later they awoke to water crashing down over their heads. It was dark. They hoisted the sail, which the wind promptly tore to shreds. Next to break was the rudder. “We drifted for eight days,” Mano told me. “Without food. Without water.” The boys tried catching fish. They managed to collect some rainwater in hollowed-out coconut shells and shared it equally between them, each taking a sip in the morning and another in the evening.

    Then, on the eighth day, they spied a miracle on the horizon. A small island, to be precise. Not a tropical paradise with waving palm trees and sandy beaches, but a hulking mass of rock, jutting up more than a thousand feet out of the ocean. These days, ‘Ata is considered uninhabitable. But “by the time we arrived,” Captain Warner wrote in his memoirs, “the boys had set up a small commune with food garden, hollowed-out tree trunks to store rainwater, a gymnasium with curious weights, a badminton court, chicken pens and a permanent fire, all from handiwork, an old knife blade and much determination.” While the boys in Lord of the Flies come to blows over the fire, those in this real-life version tended their flame so it never went out, for more than a year.

    The kids agreed to work in teams of two, drawing up a strict roster for garden, kitchen and guard duty. Sometimes they quarrelled, but whenever that happened they solved it by imposing a time-out. Their days began and ended with song and prayer. Kolo fashioned a makeshift guitar from a piece of driftwood, half a coconut shell and six steel wires salvaged from their wrecked boat – an instrument Peter has kept all these years – and played it to help lift their spirits. And their spirits needed lifting. All summer long it hardly rained, driving the boys frantic with thirst. They tried constructing a raft in order to leave the island, but it fell apart in the crashing surf.

    Worst of all, Stephen slipped one day, fell off a cliff and broke his leg. The other boys picked their way down after him and then helped him back up to the top. They set his leg using sticks and leaves. “Don’t worry,” Sione joked. “We’ll do your work, while you lie there like King Taufa‘ahau Tupou himself!”

    They survived initially on fish, coconuts, tame birds (they drank the blood as well as eating the meat); seabird eggs were sucked dry. Later, when they got to the top of the island, they found an ancient volcanic crater, where people had lived a century before. There the boys discovered wild taro, bananas and chickens (which had been reproducing for the 100 years since the last Tongans had left).

    They were finally rescued on Sunday 11 September 1966. The local physician later expressed astonishment at their muscled physiques and Stephen’s perfectly healed leg. But this wasn’t the end of the boys’ little adventure, because, when they arrived back in Nuku‘alofa police boarded Peter’s boat, arrested the boys and threw them in jail. Mr Taniela Uhila, whose sailing boat the boys had “borrowed” 15 months earlier, was still furious, and he’d decided to press charges.

    Fortunately for the boys, Peter came up with a plan. It occurred to him that the story of their shipwreck was perfect Hollywood material. And being his father’s corporate accountant, Peter managed the company’s film rights and knew people in TV. So from Tonga, he called up the manager of Channel 7 in Sydney. “You can have the Australian rights,” he told them. “Give me the world rights.” Next, Peter paid Mr Uhila £150 for his old boat, and got the boys released on condition that they would cooperate with the movie. A few days later, a team from Channel 7 arrived.

    The mood when the boys returned to their families in Tonga was jubilant. Almost the entire island of Haʻafeva – population 900 – had turned out to welcome them home. Peter was proclaimed a national hero. Soon he received a message from King Taufa‘ahau Tupou IV himself, inviting the captain for an audience. “Thank you for rescuing six of my subjects,” His Royal Highness said. “Now, is there anything I can do for you?” The captain didn’t have to think long. “Yes! I would like to trap lobster in these waters and start a business here.” The king consented. Peter returned to Sydney, resigned from his father’s company and commissioned a new ship. Then he had the six boys brought over and granted them the thing that had started it all: an opportunity to see the world beyond Tonga. He hired them as the crew of his new fishing boat.

    While the boys of ‘Ata have been consigned to obscurity, Golding’s book is still widely read. Media historians even credit him as being the unwitting originator of one of the most popular entertainment genres on television today: reality TV. “I read and reread Lord of the Flies ,” divulged the creator of hit series Survivor in an interview.

    It’s time we told a different kind of story. The real Lord of the Flies is a tale of friendship and loyalty; one that illustrates how much stronger we are if we can lean on each other. After my wife took Peter’s picture, he turned to a cabinet and rummaged around for a bit, then drew out a heavy stack of papers that he laid in my hands. His memoirs, he explained, written for his children and grandchildren. I looked down at the first page. “Life has taught me a great deal,” it began, “including the lesson that you should always look for what is good and positive in people.”"

    Source: theguardian.com
    An update ...

    Moment real 'Lord of the Flies'
    castaway fulfilled his final wish by
    returning to island 50 years after
    being shipwrecked there with his
    teenage friends for 15 months

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  13. #292
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Wink

    Keeping the beat ...

    All Down the Line / You aren't too old, Charlie !

    Just after the song ends ...

    Wait for it.


    4:46 minutes


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  15. #293
    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
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    I loved that story about the Tongan boys who were shipwrecked. I told it to my husband.

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  17. #294
    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
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    I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll beat these drums down!

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  19. #295
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Thumbs Up

    Will share this here ...

    Via the Rad Man ...



    The Land Where Women Rule: Inside China's Last Matriarchy

    "In the Broadly (Vice) documentary China's Last Matriarchy, correspondent Milène Larsson spends a week in Lugu Lake with three generations of Mosuo women to find out more about their unique culture and the realities of matriarchal life."



    About the Filmmaker

    Journalist and news documentary filmmaker, Milène Larsson, has been working for VICE for almost a decade. Initially editor of the Scandinavian edition of VICE Magazine, she moved to London to become European Managing Editor. Now a senior producer at VICE News, she primarily makes news documentaries such as the award winning Israel’s Radical Left, Istanbul Rising, Young and Gay in Putin’s Russia, and the major migration series, Europe or Die. She has appeared on CNN, Sky News, and helped produce VICE on HBO.

    More from the Filmmaker

    China’s one-child policy led to millions of female infanticides—except in a lush valley known as the “Land Where Women Rule.” Located in the foothills of the Himalayas, Lugu Lake is home to China’s Mosuo matriarchy. The region’s 40,000 denizens have come up with a unique family structure that puts women in charge. The Mosuo’s “walking marriages”—in which women can have as many boyfriends as they want throughout their lifetime—replace traditional monogamy, and inheritance passes from mother to daughter. But are the women really in control, and how are men fairing under their rule? Broadly correspondent Milène Larsson spends a week in Lugu Lake with three generations of Mosuo women to find out what life is like in one of the world’s last matriarchies.

    What evoked our interest in China’s Mosuo matriarchy, aside from the obvious rarity of a place where women are in charge, inherit, and are allowed as many lovers as they please, was how their centuries of isolation in the foothills of the Himalayas has allowed them to come up with their very own and unique family structure and relationship model. We wanted to understand how traditional life outside of the monogamous norm works and how it affects women’s, men’s, elderly people’s, and children’s social status.

    About the Collaborator

    Broadly (VICE) is a website and digital video channel devoted to representing the multiplicity of women’s experiences. Through original reporting and documentary film, Broadly, provides a sustained focus on the issues that matter most to women. As one YouTube commenter succinctly put it, “So basicly [sic] vice but excluding anything of relevance that includes men.”

    Source

    Feb 25, 2016

    24:29 minutes


    Last edited by giovonni, 25th May 2020 at 06:49.

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    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    I stayed with a nomad family in the sahara desert

    Bernardo Bacalhau


    A few month ago I had the opportunity to stay with a nomadic tribe in the Sahara Desert while I was doing a roadtrip in Morocco. Some of the humblest people I have ever met. This is that story.
    May 5, 2020

    18:03 minutes



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    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Out of Africa + Mexico ...

    The perfect coffee – fair trade and sustainable | DW Documentary


    Germans love coffee, and the country doesn't really wake up without it. But is it sustainably produced and fairly traded? Not really. This documentary investigates efforts to improve the situation.

    One of the new coffee traders with a conscience is Xaver Kitzinger. Together with his African partners of the Rwandan coffee cooperative "Dukundekawa Musasa," he's aiming to improve the lot of local coffee growers. The cooperative is unique because only women work there. The beans are roasted in Rwanda, so that income goes back into the local economy. In 2018, Kitzinger and his crew imported 11 thousand kilograms of coffee from Rwanda to Germany.

    Usually, a container ship transports the commodity to Europe. Now, Cornelius Bockermann wants to change that. He is the captain of the "Avontuur," which regularly carries coffee beans to Germany. Nearly 100 years old, it is the first German sailing ship to bring cargo regularly from all around the world to Europe in the modern day. Because it is driven by the wind, the ship is quiet, and runs without fossil fuels. Its carbon dioxide emissions are 90 percent lower than conventional vessels.

    One of the recipients of the shipment is Aaron Li Küppers. He runs Hamburg's "Teikei Café" with his father. Together they serve up coffee with a conscience in recyclable cups and reinvest their profits in new fair-trade and sustainable projects.

    May 28, 2020

    25:55 minutes


    Last edited by giovonni, Yesterday at 13:26.

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  25. #298
    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
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    I drink coffee every day. At home.

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    I drink a pot of coffee everyday...makes my ears pop...
    "A large infusion of cash will cure most forms of fanatacism" - Thumbnail Biographies

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    Super Moderator Norway Elen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer View Post
    I drink coffee every day. At home.
    I come from a coffee drinking family and it's black coffee I'm talking about. The preference is organic or fair trade.
    Whatever is true. Whatever is noble. Whatever is right. Whatever is lovely. Whatever is admirable. Anything of excellence and worthy of praise. Dwell on these things. Jesus Christ (I agree)

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