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  1. #31
    Senior Member giovonni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by giovonni View Post

    The latest from the Bronx ...

    FAMOUS GRAVE TOUR - New York #3 (Billie Holiday, Miles Davis, etc.)




    Published on Nov 28, 2018

    30:05 minutes


    The latest ...

    FAMOUS GRAVE TOUR - New York #4 (Joan Crawford, Aaliyah, etc.)

    Hollywood Graveyard



    Welcome to Hollywood Graveyard, where we set out to remember and celebrate the lives of those who lived to entertain us, by visiting their final resting places. Today we continue our tour of New York at Westchester Hills and Ferncliff Cemeteries, where we'll find such stars as Joan Crawford, Ed Sullivan, Aaliyah, and many more.

    Full list of stars visited today:
    George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Billy Rose, Judy Holliday, Tony Randall, John Garfield, Lee Strasberg, Adolph Zukor, Bela Bartok, Joe Young, Judy Tyler, Joan Crawford, Ed Sullivan, Jerome Kern, Moss Hart, Kitty Carlisle, Judy Garland, Northern Calloway, Harold Arlen, Anya Taranda, Paul Robeson, Thelonious Monk, Jam Master Jay, Malcolm X, Basil Rathbone, Cab Calloway, Aaliyah.

    Published on Dec 16, 2018
    34:59 minutes


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  3. #32
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    hmm ...




    Russians Pine for Soviet Times Amid Economic Stagnation


    In a survey by the Russian Levada polling organization, 66 percent of Russians said they regretted the break-up of the USSR, a level not seen since 2005.
    "The number of Russians who regret the break-up of the Soviet Union has risen to its highest since 2005, amid rising economic concerns and nostalgia for the Soviet welfare system, the Levada pollster said Wednesday.

    President Vladimir Putin famously dubbed the 1991 dissolution of the Soviet Union the greatest catastrophe of the 20th century and he and many Russians have long lamented the blow its demise dealt to Moscow's great power status.

    The number of Russians pining for the Soviet past has been steadily rising under Putin since he returned to the presidency in 2012, poll data issued by the independent Levada Center Wednesday showed.

    In the survey, 66 percent of Russians said they regretted the Soviet break-up, a level not seen since 2005 when Levada recorded 65 percent and Putin was on his second term in the Kremlin.

    The number of nostalgic Russians fell gradually from 2004, reaching a low of 49 percent in 2012, before rising to its current level, the pollster found, on a par with the 1990s after the Soviet collapse.

    Karina Pipiya, a sociologist at Levada, said that in the past such flings were often triggered by loss of international prestige and questions of national identity.

    "Now the nostalgia is more determined by economic factors and regret that there used to be more social justice and that the government worked for the people and that it was better in terms of care for citizens and paternalistic expectations," she said.

    Ordinary Russians have faced stagnating incomes, a weaker ruble and inflation since 2014, when the Russian economy entered recession amid falling oil prices and Western sanctions.

    To help balance state coffers, the Kremlin this year raised the retirement age for both men and women in a highly unpopular measure that dented Putin's popularity rating.

    Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov brushed off the findings of the nostalgia poll.

    "Other sociologists will say that people are always inclined to retrospectively idealize what happened to them in their youth, and that everything that happened in youth was tastier, more reliable and greater," said Peskov."

    Who was Karl Marx? | DW Documentary

    2018 marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of German philosopher and Communist icon Karl Marx.
    Is Karl Marx still relevant in the 21st century?

    Philosopher, historian and economist Karl Marx is a name that’s back on everyone's lips. The documentary explores the ongoing impact of his writings in Europe and China. How should we approach the legacy of someone who - like few others before or since - not only changed the world, but divided it as well? Even though not everyone accepts his ideas, Marx's analyses and theories motivated many people to take political action. We meet activists, witnesses and experts - individuals who are able to illuminate Karl Marx's impact from the Russian revolution until today. Even in the 21st century, two hundred years after his birth, Marx has lost none of his relevance.

    After the fall of the Iron Curtain in Europe and the end of the Cold War in 1989 and 1990, the sun seemed to be setting on Marx. But during the financial crisis of 2007-2008, when the contradictions of capitalism were once more laid bare, Marx was resurrected as an icon. His theories and ideas are now enjoying something of a renaissance at universities, churches, and conferences, and in mainstream broadcast and print media. The Chinese have even donated a larger-than-life statue of Marx to the city of his birth, Trier.

    This thought-provoking documentary does not shy away from controversy. As well providing insight into Karl Marx’s life and work, it investigates what appealed to past and present advocates of his philosophies, bringing the story to life with a rich trove of archive material.

    DW Documentary
    Published on May 5, 2018

    42:25 minutes


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    Question

    Bodies matter ...
    And someone has to do it ...



    The Exhumer (Grave-Digger Documentary) - Real Stories

    "The Exhumer is an observational documentary following the work of exhumation specialist, Peter Mitchell, whose profession has already seen him exhume 30,000 bodies - sometimes individuals, sometimes whole cemeteries and rebury them in new graves.

    We follow Peter over several months as he supervises the controversial exhumation of a Christian cemetery in Egypt - where some of the bodies have been buried for as little as just a few months – and oversees a mass exhumation job at an old churchyard in Scotland."


    Published on Dec 20, 2018

    47:42 minutes


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  7. #34
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    A worthy look back during these political and economic uncertain times ...

    “Words make you think a thought. Music makes you feel a feeling. A song makes you feel a thought.”
    -- Yip Harburg



    A Tribute to Blacklisted Lyricist Yip Harburg: The Man Who Put the Rainbow in The Wizard of Oz

    "His name might not be familiar to many, but his songs are sung by millions around the world. Today, we take a journey through the life and work of Yip Harburg, the Broadway lyricist who wrote such hits as “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” and who put the music into The Wizard of Oz.

    Born into poverty on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Harburg always included a strong social and political component to his work, fighting racism and poverty. A lifelong socialist, Harburg was blacklisted and hounded throughout much of his life. We speak with Harburg’s son, Ernie Harburg, about the music and politics of his father. Then we take an in-depth look at The Wizard of Oz, and hear a medley of Harburg’s Broadway songs and the politics of the times in which they were created."

    Democracy Now!
    Published on Dec 25, 2018

    58:01 minutes

    Best viewed in full screen



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  9. #35
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    The latest ...

    FAMOUS GRAVE TOUR - New York #5 (James Cagney, Anne Bancroft, etc.)



    Welcome to Hollywood Graveyard, where we set out to remember and celebrate the lives of those who lived to entertain us, by visiting their final resting places. Today we conclude our tour of New York, at Kensico and Gate of Heaven Cemeteries, where we'll find such stars as Babe Ruth, Billie Burke, James Cagney, and many more.

    Full list of stars visited today: Lou Gehrig, Florenz Ziegfeld, Billie Burke, Ayn Rand, Tommy Dorsey, Danny Kaye, Sylvia Fine, Soupy Sales, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Olive Deering, Howard Smith, Anne Bancroft, Fred Allen, Bess Houdini, Dorothy Kilgallen, Sal Mineo, Babe Ruth, James Cagney.

    Published on Dec 25, 2018

    22:54 minutes


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  11. #36
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    A critical look ...


    Richard Wolff: We Need a More Humane Economic System—Not One That Only Benefits the Rich


    The partial shutdown of the U.S. federal government is entering its fifth day after a political impasse over President Donald Trump’s contentious demand for border wall funding. Funding for about a quarter of all federal programs expired at midnight on Friday, including the departments of Justice, Agriculture and Homeland Security. On Christmas Day, Trump said the shutdown will last until Democrats agree to fund his $5 billion U.S.-Mexico border wall, despite previously repeatedly claiming Mexico would pay for the wall. The shutdown is occurring as concern grows over the U.S. economy. U.S. stock markets are on pace to suffer their worst December since 1931 during the Great Depression. In response, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin held an emergency meeting with top financial regulators and also convened a separate call with top executives of six major banks. We speak to economist and professor Richard Wolff.

    Democracy Now!
    Published on Dec 26, 2018
    17:16 minutes


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    Worth the listen ...


    Afro Germany - being black and German

    DW Documentary

    Black and German: news anchor Jana Pareigis has spent her entire life being asked about her skin color and afro hair. What is it like to be Black in Germany? What needs to change?

    In our documentary "Afro Germany", Pareigis travels through Germany to speak with other black Germans, including rap and hip hop artists and pro footballers, , and find out what their experiences of racism in Germany have been. "Where are you from?" Afro-German journalist Jana Pareigis has heard that question since her early childhood. And she’s not alone. Black people have been living in Germany for around 400 years, and today there are an estimated one million Germans with dark skin. But they still get asked the often latently racist question, "Where are you from?" Jana Pareigis is familiar with the undercurrents of racism in the western world. When she was a child, the Afro-German TV presenter also thought her skin color was a disadvantage. "When I was young, I wanted to be white," she says. Pareigis takes us on a trip through Germany from its colonial past up to the present day, visiting other Black Germans to talk about their experiences. They include German rapper and hip hop artist Samy Deluxe, pro footballer Gerald Asamoah and Theodor Michael, who lived as a Black man in the Third Reich. They talk about what it’s like to be Black in Germany.

    Published on Mar 29, 2017
    41:57 minutes


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  15. #38
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    Social worker leaves secret $11 million fortune to children’s charities


    By Associated Press

    December 28, 2018

    SEATTLE — "Alan Naiman was known for an unabashed thriftiness that veered into comical, but even those closest to him had no inkling of the fortune that he quietly amassed and the last act that he had long planned.

    The Washington state social worker died of cancer this year at age 63, leaving most of a surprising $11 million estate to children’s charities that help the poor, sick, disabled and abandoned. The amount baffled the beneficiaries and his best friends, who are lauding Naiman as the anniversary of his death approaches in January.

    That’s because the Seattle man patched up his shoes with duct tape sought deals at the grocery store deli at closing time and took his best friends out to lunch at fast-food joints.

    Naiman, who died unmarried and childless, loved kids but also was intensely private, scrimping, investing and working extra jobs to stockpile money that he rarely spent on himself after seeing how unfair life could be for the most vulnerable children, his friends say.

    They believe a lifelong devotion to his older brother who had a developmental disability influenced Naiman, though he rarely spoke of it. The brother died in 2013, the same year Naiman splurged on a sports car — a modestly priced Scion FR-S.

    “Growing up as a kid with an older, disabled brother kind of colored the way he looked at things,” close friend Susan Madsen said.

    A former banker, Naiman worked the past two decades at the state Department of Social and Health Services, handling after-hours calls. He earned $67,234 and also took on side gigs, sometimes working as many as three jobs. He saved and invested enough to make several millions of dollars and also inherited millions more from his parents, said Shashi Karan, a friend from his banking days.

    Thrilled when he finally qualified for senior discounts, Naiman bought his clothes from the grocery store. He loved cars, but for most of his life, drove beat-up vehicles and seemed to enjoy the solitude and savings of solo road trips, friends say.

    After Naiman’s death, Karan realized how little he knew of the other aspects of his longtime friend’s life.

    “I don’t know if he was lonely. I think he was a loner,” Karan said."

    A volunteer folds and sorts clothes at Treehouse, a nonprofit organization in Seattle that helps foster kids, and one of the nonprofits that received a large donation from Alan Naiman.

    "Many of the organizations benefiting from Naiman’s gifts said they didn’t know him, though they had crossed paths.

    He left $2.5 million to the Pediatric Interim Care Center, a private organization in Washington state that cares for babies born to mothers who abused drugs and helps the children wean off their dependence. The group used some of what was its largest donation ever to pay off a mortgage and buy a new vehicle to transport the 200 babies it accepts from hospitals each year.

    Naiman had called the center about a newborn while working for the state more than a decade ago and its founder, Barbara Drennen, showed up in the middle of the night to get the baby.

    “We would never dream that something like this would happen to us. I wish very much that I could have met him. I would have loved to have had him see the babies he’s protecting,” Drennen said."


    Volunteers at Treehouse.


    "Naiman gave $900,000 to the Treehouse foster care organization, telling them that he was a foster parent years ago and had brought kids in his care to the group’s popular warehouse, where wards of the state can choose toys and necessities for free.

    Treehouse is using Naiman’s money to expand its college and career counseling statewide.

    “The frugality that he lived through, that he committed to in his life, was for this,” said Jessica Ross, Treehouse’s chief development officer. “It’s really a gift to all of us to see that pure demonstration of philanthropy and love.”"


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  17. #39
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    "A book of technology predictions makes distressing reading at the end of a year that ...
    a golden anniversary ago, looked positively thrilling."







    What 2018 Looked Like Fifty Years Ago



    By Jill Lepore

    "Prophecy is a mug’s game. But then, lately, most of us are mugs. 2018 was a banner year for the art of prediction, which is not to say the science, because there really is no science of prediction. Predictive algorithms start out as historians: they study historical data to detect patterns. Then they become prophets: they devise mathematical formulas that explain the pattern, test the formulas against historical data withheld for the purpose, and use the formulas to make predictions about the future. That’s why Amazon, Google, Facebook, and everyone else are collecting your data to feed to their algorithms: they want to turn your past into your future.

    This task, like most things, used to be done by hand. In 1968, the Foreign Policy Association, formed in 1918 to promote the League of Nations, celebrated its fiftieth anniversary by publishing a book of predictions about what the world would look like, technology-wise, fifty years on. “Toward the Year 2018” was edited by Emmanuel G. Mesthene, who had served in the White House as an adviser on science and technology and who ran Harvard’s Program on Technology and Society. It makes for distressing reading at the end of 2018, a year that, a golden anniversary ago, looked positively thrilling.

    Two things are true about “Toward the Year 2018.” First, most of the machines that people expected would be invented have, in fact, been invented. Second, most of those machines have had consequences wildly different from those anticipated in 1968. It’s bad manners to look at past predictions to see if they’ve come true. Still, if history is any guide, today’s futurists have very little credibility. An algorithm would say the same.

    Carlos R. DeCarlo, the director of automation research at I.B.M., covered computers in the book, predicting that, in 2018, “machines will do more of man’s work, but will force man to think more logically.” DeCarlo was consistently half right. He correctly anticipated miniature computers (“very small, portable storage units”), but wrongly predicted the coming of a universal language (“very likely a modified and expanded form of English”). One thing he got terribly wrong: he expressed tragically unfounded confidence that “the political and social institutions of the United States will remain flexible enough to ingest the fruits of science and technology without basic damage to its value systems.”

    Reporting on the future of communication, J. R. Pierce, from Bell Labs, explained that “the Bell System is committed to the provision of a Picturephone service commercially in the early 1970s,” and that, by 2018, face-to-face communication across long distances would be available everywhere: “The transmission of pictures and texts and the distant manipulation of computers and other machines will be added to the transmission of the human voice on a scale that will eventually approach the universality of telephony.” True! “What all this will do to the world I cannot guess,” Pierce admitted, with becoming modesty. “It seems bound to affect us all.”

    Sharp-eyed observers in 1968 were already concerned about the warming of the oceans and the changing of the climate, but the atmospheric-science contributor to “Toward the Year 2018,” Thomas F. Malone, was excited by new technologies that would allow scientists to take control of the earth’s weather and climate. Malone served as the chairman of the Committee on Atmospheric Sciences of the National Academy of Sciences, which, in 1966, had issued a report endorsing “a long-range program of weather control and climate modification,” to be implemented by way of manipulating fog, cloud-seeding, and the “suppression of lightning.” He thought “the probability of success in broad climate modification is likely to exceed 50 percent by the year 2018.” Standing in the way of this objective, he warned, were political obstacles—the international coöperation required for a global climate-change program—and the possibility that, before such a thing could be fully executed, “large-scale climate modification will be effected inadvertently,” because, he had to admit, it appeared that the climate was already changing all on its own. “Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere since 1900 has caused surface temperatures to rise 0.2 degrees C,” he acknowledged, hastening to reassure his readers that, while global temperatures could conceivably keep rising all the way to 2018, there was only “a small probability that these effects will not be tolerable.”

    The only real doomsayer was the demographer Philip M. Hauser. He calculated that, by 2018, the world’s population would reach 9.7 billion (he was two billion over), with the steepest growth in Asia and Latin America, and the slowest in Europe. Also, that the distance between the rich and the poor, and between wealthy nations and poor nations, would widen. “Given the present outlook, only the faithful who believe in miracles from heaven, the optimistic who anticipate superwonders from science, the parochial fortunate who think they can continue to exist on islands of affluence in a sea of world poverty, and the naïve who anticipate nothing can look to the future with equanimity,” Hauser concluded.

    But the most prescient contributor to “Toward the Year 2018” was the M.I.T. political scientist Ithiel de Sola Pool, whose research interests included social networks and computer simulation. “By 2018 it will be cheaper to store information in a computer bank than on paper,” Pool wrote. “Tax returns, social security records, census forms, military records, perhaps a criminal record, hospital rec-ords, security clearance files, school transcripts . . . bank statements, credit ratings, job records,” and more would, by 2018, be stored on computers that could communicate with one another over a vast international network. You could find out anything about anyone, without ever leaving your desk. “By 2018 the researcher sitting at his console will be able to compile a cross-tabulation of consumer purchases (from store records) by people of low IQ (from school records) who have an unemployed member of the family (from social security records). That is, he will have the technological capability to do this. Will he have the legal right?” Pool declined to answer that question. “This is not the place to speculate how society will achieve a balance between its desire for knowledge and its desire for privacy,” he insisted.

    And that was the problem with 1968. People went ahead and built those things without worrying much about the consequences, because they figured that, by 2018, we’d have come up with all the answers. Toward 2019!" ♦


    Source: The New Yorker

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    My prediction is that by 2068 this will no longer be true...

    "2018 was a banner year for the art of prediction, which is not to say the science, because there really is no science of prediction." But really it will be more like 2118 because it is such a Huuuggge change. And it won't be machines doing the predictions. God will relent and say, "Ok, I wasn't serious". Likely he will let us know through the words of the then current Prophet that it was all a misunderstanding.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Human baggage ...
    Are we from what they carried ...



    Was there a Civilization that Predates all other known Ancient Civilizations?

    Narrated by BuzWeaver


    The Lost History Channel TKTC
    Published on Feb 1, 2018

    7:12 minutes

    Last edited by giovonni, 1st January 2019 at 20:55.

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    Unhappy

    Society/Civilization ...



    Decades-old Doritos bag washes ashore in North Carolina

    "You probably never spare a thought for your trash once you haul your trash to the curb and it’s whisked away to a magical land dump where nobody ever has to look at it, but not all garbage ends up where it’s supposed to. As humans, we do a terrible job of keeping the Earth clean and we’ve been littering for a long, long time.

    A great reminder of that sad fact is this decades-old Doritos bag which was recently found washed ashore off the coast of North Carolina. At some point, likely several decades ago, this thin plastic container found its way into the ocean, and aside from some faded colors and a few holes it’s in remarkable shape.

    The bag was discovered by National Park Service employees on the shore and the logo on the bag along the trademark helped them identify it as being from the late 1970s.

    Plastic lasts a long, long time under just about any conditions — that’s why it’s so incredibly harmful when thrown away with no regard — but some questions about this particular find remain.

    Plastic is certainly tough, but if this bag had been floating around in the ocean for four decades you’d expect it to be at least a bit more mangled. Some have suggested that the bag had spent the bulk of its life elsewhere before ending up in the ocean more recently, but that’s impossible to trace.

    Others have questioned whether the bag really is as old as it seems. Doritos does do “throwback” designs for its bags on occasion, but while you can get a retro-styled Doritos bag in the “taco” flavor, no nacho cheese Doritos are offered in bags like this one.

    Whatever its origins, it’s a timely reminder that we need to do a better job of cleaning up after ourselves if we don’t want the Earth to turn into one big dump."

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    Question

    Speaking of washing ashore ...

    As seas continue to rise, New Jersey buys residents out of flood zones

    "Hundreds of thousands of New Jersey residents live in flood zones that can become inundated with storm water. But the state is trying to move some of them out of harm's way in one of the biggest home buyout programs in the nation. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano reports. This story is part of our ongoing series, "Peril and Promise: The Challenge of Climate Change."


    PBS NewsHour
    Published on Jan 5, 2019

    9:57 minutes


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    A world without ...

    How cash is becoming a thing of the past | (Banking documentary)

    DW Documentary


    "Cashless payments are on the rise. They are fast, easy and convenient. Worldwide, cashless transactions have become the norm.

    But Germany’s central bank and government are still clinging on to cash. Can they stop the move towards a cashless society? Our documentary shows who is behind the worldwide anti-cash lobby. Banks want to get rid of coins and bills for cost reasons, and politicians think less cash will cut the rug out from under criminals and terrorists. Central bankers want to abolish cash because it would make it easier for them to enforce negative interest rates. And digital payment companies like Paypal or Visa simply want to profit from money transactions and collect as much financial data about consumers as they can. Their aim is to gain complete control over our buying behavior. For example, the "Better than Cash Alliance" in New York is supported by financial corporations such as Visa or Mastercard. They say the more people that are integrated into the international financial system, the more growth and jobs it will promote. But as our financial behavior becomes more and more transparent, states are also using payment data to find out more about us. The ordinary citizen’s view of cash as a store of value, independent of third party interests, is being increasingly ignored. But for them, cash is and will remain a symbol of freedom."

    Published on Nov 21, 2018

    42:25 minutes


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    A Day in South America’s “Most Humane” Prison

    VICE INTERNATIONAL


    "Prisons in Latin America have the reputation of being the most violent and dangerous in the world; overcrowded concrete spaces where corruption, gangs, and drug cartels reign. By contrast, Punta de Rieles offers a different reality. Located in the Uruguayan capital of Montevideo, it's known as "the prison from which nobody wants to escape".

    The almost 100-acre property features ample outdoor space where inmates can live, work, do yoga, have pets, and play music. Here, the focus is on helping prisoners re-acclimate to society before they've even left confinement. VICE en Español spent the day at Punta de Rieles, talking to inmates and learning about Uruguay's progressive "open" prison."

    Spanish language with English captions

    14:07 minutes


  30. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to giovonni For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (9th January 2019), Kathy (9th January 2019), NotAPretender (9th January 2019)

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