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Thread: Satanic Witchcraft in TV and Movies

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    Yes, the Sabrina the Teenage Witch series showed it in a pretty positive light. There were allusions to the darker side of it, but never explicitly.

    As for the Buffy, the Vampire Slayer Series, they showed both the good and evil side of magic, though in that series it was used more like a metaphor for other things.

    In terms of Movies, the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings films showed both sides too. There were many more.
    My daughter and I went to watch the latest installment of the Harry Potter series. It was fantastic.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    Hi Chris,

    What was your impression about the nature of the Archangel Gabriel. I just want to proffer a tangential opinion here. The bible has a saying, paraphrasing, "In the eyes of the Lord all sins are equally grave". My interpretation of that is that the 'motivation of the sin' is the sin not the actual act or result. Given that we live a very illusory existence where potentially the only real thing is consciousness then physical manifestations tend to not be the main point of creation. Consequently, we have to make judgments of 'motivation' beyond what we conceive as ostensibly physical beings.

    So anyway...Is Gabriel good or bad?
    Hi NAP,

    I made a mistake there, it was actually Michael, not Gabriel, though I doubt there is much difference between them.

    I'm not a Christian myself (I'm not at all convinced that Jesus of Nazareth was a real, historical person, for instance), but to my considerable surprise, I did find that the general Christian world view is pretty close to the Truth, even if it isn't 100 percent accurate. Remember, I came to this as a die-hard Atheist, who practically worshipped Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins.

    As for Michael, I have no doubt that he is one of the good guys. I would assume he is on the same team as Gabriel. In my communications with heavenly beings (they call themselves the Denizens of Heaven), I never had any doubt that they were the good guys. Conversely, communicating with the denizens of the Underworld (I dislike the word Hell, it is highly inaccurate in this context) proved to be frustrating and even dangerous, with much duplicity and lying, as well as one highly unpleasant and involuntary trip down under where I saw one of these beings in the flesh. Not. Doing. It. Again.

    I only spoke to Michael a few times, he told me that the theme of a constant war between Heaven and Hell is essentially correct, angels and demons are engaged in constant spiritual warfare and the battleground is Earth (in a higher, invisible dimension), as well as the Underworld. The UFO phenomenon is also part of that. Downed and Crashed UFOs are just collateral damage in this conflict, though most of it is fought outside the range of our senses, so we barely notice any of it.

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    Quote Originally posted by Fred Steeves View Post
    Sure that happens at times, but by no means every time. Other times a person can simply see the proverbial handwriting on the wall that continuing said conversation is a dead end, say so, and promptly move on without needlessly wasting more of one's time.
    Hey Fred, Have you ever seen that sneaker commercial where the 3 black guys are talking heavy street talk and then someone yells 'cut!'. And the 3 guys start talking among each other. One guy is complaining that he did Shakespheare in college and one of the others is saying "Where's my motivation!".

    Well Fred, "Where's the motivation!"

    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    Hi NAP,

    I made a mistake there, it was actually Michael, not Gabriel, though I doubt there is much difference between them.
    What can I say, I agree, but then I'm prejudicial...

    Quote Originally posted by Aragorn View Post
    I don't want to downplay the risks of getting involved with satanism and/or occultism, but part of me is wondering whether Hollywood's (and the music industry's) infatuation with occultism wouldn't be merely just another fashion thing. Occultism and the whole Illuminati meme are "in" these days.
    Most assuredly yes, Aragorn...but, that doesn't lessen the potential downside of playing with things that one has no 'intrinsic' knowledge of. In fact, that is the greatest danger...some choose unhealthy paths...some are conned into it.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer View Post
    Is there not also music in 'heaven?
    I forgot to actually respond to your question properly, so let me do that now.

    "The Music of the Spheres" is a real thing. The popular image of a chorus of angels constantly praising God isn't that wide of the mark either. It is a highly accurate allegory, though not be taken literally.

    Here's my experience of it:

    The denizens of heaven, which include angels (they are messengers sent by and from heaven to earth, to teach and guide humanity) have one mind. They can go from a collective mind, to an individual one in an instant. They have no need to hide their thoughts from each other, since their motivations are pure. As a natural consequence of their harmonious existence, they often coalesce into a single consciousness and in such instances, they speak with one voice, but this One voice is made up of many individual voices speaking in perfect unison and harmony. That is where the allegory of a chorus of angels comes in, since singing in a chorus is somewhat similar to that.

    There is also a musical element to their collective voice, it is incredibly beautiful and moving, much like the singing of a chorus of angels would be.

    This ability to go between individual and collective minds as they please also explains the confusion in the Bible about God(s). The Elohim for instance (who spoke to me extensively and in this beautiful collective voice I just described) is plural, but is usually translated as "God" and only in a few rare cases as "gods" or "sons of God". In truth, there is no difference, because they have one mind, without actually losing their individuality. The Arabic word "Allah" is actually just the singular of "Elohim", but like I said, it makes no sense to differentiate between individual denizens of heaven, they share the same mind most of the time.
    Last edited by Chris, 23rd November 2018 at 18:57.

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    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    That is certainly something to consider. I think people who were brought up with a Christian background are particularly prone to what is called "Satanic Panic".
    There is a distinction that can be made though...Personal gain versus Holistic gain. One guy characterized social good and bad as those things that add or remove resources from the extant 'population', A wholeness is vital to the definition. For example, slavery is a definite bad because it removed indigenous population and placed it in a situation where they were without resources. A definite good would be exampled by charitable organizations that provide food and drink to the poverty stricken. Of course, the farther one goes down the rabbit hole the more complex recognizing the line becomes.

    It is my opnion that at fine granularity all 'social motivations' break down. Then we are faced with the ultimate question...Are we as individuals good or bad!?
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    I feel like I came from a place where everyone was open, honest, and free with each other. There was no meanness, no backstabbing, no side-taking, no lies... It's one of the ways that I don't really fit in 'down here'.

    Throughout my life I've been told I'm "too nice", and "too trusting".

    As if that is a bad thing.

    I'm not saying I came from heaven, but I came from that mindset.

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    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer View Post
    I feel like I came from a place where everyone was open, honest, and free with each other. There was no meanness, no backstabbing, no side-taking, no lies... It's one of the ways that I don't really fit in 'down here'.

    Throughout my life I've been told I'm "too nice", and "too trusting".

    As if that is a bad thing.

    I'm not saying I came from heaven, but I came from that mindset.
    Most people feel that way, I think. We all have a powerful light-body that is immortal, yet most of us aren't even aware of it. It needs to be activated, cultivated, strengthened and built up over many decades. It is what we will be left with after we die, everything else in our "lives" will crumble to dust. I think that calling this temporary existence on earth "life" is already problematic, for if it was really life, how come we're always just a heartbeat away from all of it coming to an end?

    I really do think that many, if not most of us here on earth are actually heavenly beings who were cast down or got stuck here for some reason. I know that when I'm in my light body, I'm a completely different person. I feel powerful and different. I even have wings which I can flap. I know it sounds crazy, but when I'm in that mode, it feels perfectly normal and natural.

    Personally, I have long stopped trying to fit in, I concentrate my mind on other things and I care very little about the material world, only inasmuch as I need it to maintain my body. We all have to eat, sleep, have a place to stay and get around the landscape, so we need to engage with the material world to a certain degree, but I only do it to the extent that is absolutely necessary.

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    ... always just a heartbeat away...

    So true.

    I would feel sad for loved ones that I'd leave behind if that last beat came.

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    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer View Post
    ... always just a heartbeat away...

    So true.

    I would feel sad for loved ones that I'd leave behind if that last beat came.
    That is also my main concern about leaving this world behind. I had a taste of it when I was knocked out of my body due to an accident, an incident I described in detail on this thread a while ago. What struck me in that out-of-body state was how serene I felt. There was no worry, pain or fear whatsoever. I imagine being in the womb is a similar feeling. I felt warm, loved, fearless and enveloped in a liquid medium, in which I was floating weightlessly.

    However, that feeling ended when I heard my flatmate call out my name, increasingly frantically, as my body was lying unconsciously, maybe even lifelessly, on the bathroom floor. I myself was floating above it, happily and contentedly. His voice came through with a delay and quite muffled, again very much as if I was underwater and the sound waves had to penetrate a liquid barrier. My serenity was replaced with concern and compassion. I knew that my inability to respond was causing my friend worry and that it was selfish of me to just float around enjoying myself(I even had to flail my arms and legs to manage to turn around).

    It was that worry which convinced me I had to return to my body. As soon as I thought that, I started swirling and whirling around and shrinking, like a Genie going back into his bottle. However, without that body, I had no way of telling my friend that I was OK and in fact I was quite helpless, unable to do much of anything in that state. I wonder if it is a bit like being born again, you are quite helpless, like a newborn baby, initially, and you need someone to help you out and look after you, after you cross over. Is that why NDE accounts invariably mention that somebody will wait for you on the other side? These possibilities are fascinating to ponder.

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    An interesting article about Satanism in the Music Industry. Note that according to the Bible, Lucifer was THE heavenly musician before his downfall and this plays a part in why many musicians feel so drawn to him. I believe he may also have a spot spot for musicians himself, so it probably goes both ways. That is NOT a judgement on music or musicians, just a note on the personal preferences of certain individuals, including supernatural ones.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-e...-a8668551.html

    Satanism and The Rolling Stones: 50 Years of ‘Sympathy for the Devil’

    When Mick Jagger sang ‘Just call me Lucifer’, pop music changed forever, but the tragedy of Altamont lay ahead, writes Simon Hardeman

    Fifty years ago this week Mick Jagger became the Devil. Everyone had known the Rolling Stones were misogynistic, drug-taking, all-round bad boys but as he sang, “Please allow me to introduce myself / I’m a man of wealth and taste…” the genie – or, rather the demon – bolted from the bottle. The results would be devastating. For pop, it laid a new path for some of the biggest bands ever, but for the Rolling Stones it led to a vicious murder at an infamous concert exactly a year from the song’s release, and an abiding reputation for evil.

    The song was “Sympathy for the Devil”, the opening number on the Beggars Banquet album, both released on 6 December 1968. The Stones’ previous LP had been Their Satanic Majesties Request. Its occult pretensions pretty much began and ended with the title, but it was a sign of something coming. Stones guitarist Keith Richards’ lover Anita Pallenberg, with whom Jagger had a steamy on-set relationship during shooting of the film Performance earlier in the year, was said to wear anti-vampire garlic round her neck and keep voodoo-style bones in a drawer; American filmmaker and occultist Kenneth Anger wanted Jagger to play Lucifer in a film he was making; and, as the peace-and-love era drew to a close, the dark side had become increasingly attractive to pop musicians. Occult legend Aleister Crowley had appeared on the cover of The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper, and there was even a diabolic track in the charts on the day of the song’s release – Gun’s “Race with the Devil”.

    But what seems to have been the key inspiration for songwriter Jagger (it is his only solo masterpiece, according to his biographer Philip Norman) was when his girlfriend, Marianne Faithfull, gave him The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov’s long-suppressed and recently translated Russian novel in which the Devil appears in Moscow and creates murder and mayhem. “Sympathy” has many lines that mirror Bulgakov’s book – including the way the debonair Devil presents himself, and passages about Jesus’s crucifixion.

    Jagger had written “Sympathy” as “sort of like a Bob Dylan song”, he told Rolling Stone’s Jann Wenner in 1995. But during recording, guitarist Keith Richards suggested its trademark samba beat. Jagger said this had “a tremendous hypnotic power… because it is a primitive African, South American, Afro-whatever-you-call-that rhythm. So to white people, it has a very sinister thing about it.”

    And over this insistent, primal rhythm he personified Satan in an extraordinarily uncompromising, gloating way – “I was ’round when Jesus Christ / Had his moment of doubt and pain / Made damn sure Pilate / Washed his hands and sealed his fate… / I stuck around St Petersburg / When I saw it was a time for a change / Killed the Tsar and his ministers / Anastasia screamed in vain”. And, in case anyone doubted where he was coming from, he sang “Just call me Lucifer”. The original title of the song had been “The Devil Is My Name”.

    Musicians and artists had played with devilry before but for pop this was something else. Jagger WAS the Devil! Richards told Rolling Stone: “Before, we were just innocent kids out for a good time.” But after “Sympathy for the Devil”, he said, “they’re saying, ‘They’re evil, they’re evil’… There are black magicians who think we are acting as unknown agents of Lucifer and others who think we are Lucifer.”

    Jagger was taken aback by the effect. “It was only one song. It wasn’t like it was a whole album, with lots of occult signs on the back,” he said, 20 years later. He was amazed how “people seemed to embrace the image so readily, and it has carried all the way over into heavy metal bands...”

    He had opened Pandora’s Box, according to musician and occultist Kieran Leonard. “It kicked down the door for diabolism in the mainstream,” says Leonard, whose forthcoming book investigates the esoteric and creativity, and whose music with his own band, St Leonard’s Horses, is inspired by this passion. He admits a fascination with the darker side was “in the air” then, but says “Sympathy for the Devil” was the key moment, “the pin-prick in the time map”.

    And then, a year to the day later, came the moment that confirmed the Stones’ new reputation. It was what one reporter called “rock’n’roll’s all-time worst day”. At their chaotic free concert at the Altamont Speedway in California an African American teenager with a gun was knifed to death by Hells Angels to whom the Stones had contracted security. Popular belief, fuelled by bad reporting, was that the murder happened as the band were playing “Sympathy for the Devil”. Though trouble seemed to start during that song, it was actually a few numbers later that Meredith Hunter was stabbed. Nevertheless, accused of “diabolical egotism” by Rolling Stone magazine, and stunned by the general outcry, the Stones didn’t play the number live again for several years.

    They might have been warned off, but others were not. Black Sabbath formed in 1969, aiming to create the musical equivalent of horror films. Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page was inspired by Aleister Crowley, opened an occult bookshop, and a line of Crowley’s was written into the vinyl of Led Zeppelin III. David Bowie incorporated occult inspiration into his music all the way from “Quicksand” on Hunky Dory to his final album. The list of hard rock and heavy metal bands who have dabbled in and drawn on the occult is a long one, from Black Widow’s chilling early-Seventies “Come to the Sabbat” to Iron Maiden’s “The Number of the Beast” to Marilyn Manson to the welter of contemporary metal bands with names such as Evil Empowered, Make them Suffer, Black Rites in the Black Nights, Black Wedding, The Devil Inside, Pop Evil and Black Soul.

    As rock’n’roll frontman Jim Jones of the Jim Jones Revue says, Satan is now “an easy go-to, a one-stop shop for distancing yourself from everything ‘good white Christian’” though, for him, occultism and Satanism represent esoteric knowledge –“always the smart choice, whatever the consequences”.

    There are three fascinating films about “Sympathy for the Devil”. Jean-Luc Godard’s otherwise borderline-unwatchable film of the same name documents the recording session, the first time audiences had been able to see a major band creating a track in the studio in such a way. The Altamont gig is the jaw-dropping centrepiece to the Maysles brothers’ movie Gimme Shelter. And just five days after “Sympathy” was released, Jagger was captured performing the song for the film The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus. It’s still shocking today, when the “devil’s horns” hand gesture is commonplace in the mildest of music, to see him pull off his shirt at the end and reveal the horned head on his chest.

    Or maybe the Devil had been underneath all along.

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    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    Note that according to the Bible, Lucifer was THE heavenly musician before his downfall [...]
    Um, what Bible would that be, then?

    The name Lucifer was only introduced into Christianity through the King James translation of the Bible. The pertinent passage was a sarcastic letter from Isaiah to the then-king of Tyrus (i.e. Babylon), a powerful but very corrupt (and very mortal) man. In said letter, which was written in Latin, Isaiah calls the king of Tyrus a "bearer of (false) light", and "an angel who fell from grace". The Latin word for light-bearer is "lucifer". And so, when the Bible was translated to English under King James, the word "lucifer" was not interpreted as a sarcastic description, but as a proper name, and the letter of Isaiah to the king of Tyrus as some kind of tirade against an allegedly fallen angel named Lucifer.

    The Roman Catholic Church did not originally support this interpretation, but later on included it in the official narrative of Creation, as that Lucifer had been the first and mightiest of all angels, loved above all others, until he decided that he wanted to be worshiped more than Yahweh, after which Archangel Michael cast him and his followers — allegedly worth a whole third of Heaven's Legion — down from Heaven and into Hell.

    Interestingly enough, the official Bible — at least, the one used on the mainland here in Europe — still does not feature the name Lucifer as a proper name, nor does it mention that one third of the angels were cast into Hell. Instead, the Apocalypse of John speaks of a dragon that was cast down from Heaven, and his angels with him, onto Earth — not into Hell.

    Of course, various alternative Bible versions exist, but those are not recognized by the Roman Catholic Church. The Ethiopian Bible for instance also includes the books of Enoch, which the Roman Catholic Church does not consider canonical.
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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    Quote Originally posted by Aragorn View Post
    Um, what Bible would that be, then?

    The name Lucifer was only introduced into Christianity through the King James translation of the Bible. The pertinent passage was a sarcastic letter from Isaiah to the then-king of Tyrus (i.e. Babylon), a powerful but very corrupt (and very mortal) man. In said letter, which was written in Latin, Isaiah calls the king of Tyrus a "bearer of (false) light", and "an angel who fell from grace". The Latin word for light-bearer is "lucifer". And so, when the Bible was translated to English under King James, the word "lucifer" was not interpreted as a sarcastic description, but as a proper name, and the letter of Isaiah to the king of Tyrus as some kind of tirade against an allegedly fallen angel named Lucifer.

    The Roman Catholic Church did not originally support this interpretation, but later on included it in the official narrative of Creation, as that Lucifer had been the first and mightiest of all angels, loved above all others, until he decided that he wanted to be worshiped more than Yahweh, after which Archangel Michael cast him and his followers — allegedly worth a whole third of Heaven's Legion — down from Heaven and into Hell.

    Interestingly enough, the official Bible — at least, the one used on the mainland here in Europe — still does not feature the name Lucifer as a proper name, nor does it mention that one third of the angels were cast into Hell. Instead, the Apocalypse of John speaks of a dragon that was cast down from Heaven, and his angels with him, onto Earth — not into Hell.

    Of course, various alternative Bible versions exist, but those are not recognized by the Roman Catholic Church. The Ethiopian Bible for instance also includes the books of Enoch, which the Roman Catholic Church does not consider canonical.
    I'm using the popular perception of Satan/Lucifer/the Devil as the same being, which of course is not the case of all. Lucifer probably refers to an actual planet or some sort of astrological phenomenon in any case. You might be right about the etymology of the word, but in common parlance it is used interchangeably with Satan, so I'm sticking to that.

    Satan itself isn't a proper name but a title or an adjective, simply meaning Adversary.

    Azaz-el means against El, or opposed to El, who is the Jewish Sky God.

    El-ohim refers to the Sons of El, his descendants, basically.

    There are many other references to El, as in Sama-el, Rafa-el, Micha-el, Gabri-el, Isra-el, etc... Even the word El-ite has a similar etymology, which is certainly interesting in terms of who the El-ite really are.

    My own view is that the sky gods are clearly an Alien race. There was some sort of war in heaven (space) between two opposing groups and the losers were exiled to earth, possibly to some underground location or base. Most cultures have a record of this (Olympians vs Titans, Asuras vs Devas, etc...)


    The word Devil could very well be a reference to the Indo-Persian Deva/Devi (god/goddess in India, demon/demoness in Persia). The gods of India were the the demons of Persia and vice versa. A similar "swap" has taken place when Christianity replaced Paganism and a lot of formerly respected gods became demons in Christianity.

    The word Demon itself has an interesting etymology. It comes from the Greek "Daemon" which simply means Higher Self, as opposed to the lower self, or Eidolon. In light of this, supposed Demonic Possession takes on a very different meaning...

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    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    [...]

    Satan itself isn't a proper name but a title or an adjective, simply meaning Adversary.
    That is correct. In the Book of Job of the Old Testament, they speak of the Satan — and thus: a title, rather than a proper name — and this Satan resides in Heaven, not in Hell or anywhere else. He is effectively an angel, and his role is that of a prosecutor charged with exposing the sins of mankind before Yahweh. It is also Yahweh himself, not the Satan, who subjects Job to all of his ordeals, in order to make his case before the Satan that man will always redeem himself and remain faithful to Yahweh.

    So all things considered, that Yahweh dude is himself a bit of a prick, isn't he?

    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    Azaz-el means against El, or opposed to El, who is the Jewish Sky God.

    El-ohim refers to the Sons of El, his descendants, basically.

    There are many other references to El, as in Sama-el, Rafa-el, Micha-el, Gabri-el, Isra-el, etc...
    Correct. Allegedly, the "el", whether as a prefix or as a suffix, was a reference to "the Light". It is also whence stems the name "Allah". Hebrew and Arabic are different languages, but they do share common etymological roots.

    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    Even the word El-ite has a similar etymology, which is certainly interesting in terms of who the El-ite really are.
    Now that I didn't know. Interesting.

    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    My own view is that the sky gods are clearly an Alien race. There was some sort of war in heaven (space) between two opposing groups and the losers were exiled to earth, possibly to some underground location or base. Most cultures have a record of this (Olympians vs Titans, Asuras vs Devas, etc...)
    That would indeed make the most sense, yes.


    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

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    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    The word Devil could very well be a reference to the Indo-Persian Deva/Devi (god/goddess in India, demon/demoness in Persia). The gods of India were the the demons of Persia and vice versa. A similar "swap" has taken place when Christianity replaced Paganism and a lot of formerly respected gods became demons in Christianity.
    Well, another explanation could be that it's a contraction of the article and the noun, as in "the evil" becomes "devil". This would make sense because this contraction also applies in several other Germanic languages beside English.

    Quote Originally posted by Chris View Post
    The word Demon itself has an interesting etymology. It comes from the Greek "Daemon" which simply means Higher Self, as opposed to the lower self, or Eidolon. In light of this, supposed Demonic Possession takes on a very different meaning...
    Well, the ancient Greek were pantheists, and they saw daemons in just about everything. And indeed, the word "daemon" itself did not pertain to anything hostile or malevolent. It was simply the ancient Greek word for a spirit.

    By the way, in the context of computer operating systems — and most notably, UNIX-style operating systems — the original Greek spelling "daemon" is still used, and it refers to a non-interactive background process, such as what are called "services" on the Microsoft Windows platform. So if you have a UNIX server that handles the sending and receiving of mail for many distinct mailboxes, then the process taking care of this is called "the mailer daemon". Also, the concept of relegating any process to the background and making it non-interactive is called "daemonizing".
    = DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR =

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    Quote Originally posted by Aragorn View Post
    That is correct. In the Book of Job of the Old Testament, they speak of the Satan — and thus: a title, rather than a proper name — and this Satan resides in Heaven, not in Hell or anywhere else. He is effectively an angel, and his role is that of a prosecutor charged with exposing the sins of mankind before Yahweh. It is also Yahweh himself, not the Satan, who subjects Job to all of his ordeals, in order to make his case before the Satan that man will always redeem himself and remain faithful to Yahweh.

    So all things considered, that Yahweh dude is himself a bit of a prick, isn't he?
    That point is inarguable, though I am really not sure how or when YHWH came into the picture. The tetragrammaton is used as a magical incantation (hence the prohibition on blasphemy, or saying the Lord's name in vain), so I have sneaking suspicion it isn't a real person at all, but perhaps a symbol of magical power. It is certainly interesting that he never appears in person. The Christian perception of God on the other hand is a personal one, based on Zeus, Jove and perhaps Thor.

    Correct. Allegedly, the "el", whether as a prefix or as a suffix, was a reference to "the Light". It is also whence stems the name "Allah". Hebrew and Arabic are different languages, but they do share common etymological roots.
    Allah comes from Eloh, which is the singular form of Elohim. To my knowledge El and An mean Sky in Hebrew and Sumerian respectively, hence both Elohim and Anunnaki mean Sons of the Sky or Children of the Sky. If El does mean light as well, that would certainly be interesting, since in my experience, these are light beings. It would also match up with Sanskrit, where Deva means "the shining ones".

    Well, another explanation could be that it's a contraction of the article and the noun, as in "the evil" becomes "devil". This would make sense because this contraction also applies in several other Germanic languages beside English.
    That is another popular explanation, though it may well be a coincidence. Of course the Greeks will tell you that it comes from their language, Diabolos means the Accuser. What doesn't come from Greek after all?

    By the way, in the context of computer operating systems — and most notably, UNIX-style operating systems — the original Greek spelling "daemon" is still used, and it refers to a non-interactive background process, such as what are called "services" on the Microsoft Windows platform. So if you have a UNIX server that handles the sending and receiving of mail for many distinct mailboxes, then the process taking care of this is called "the mailer daemon". Also, the concept of relegating any process to the background and making it non-interactive is called "daemonizing".
    That sure sounds like the Higher Self to me...

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    A good example of how disreputable "alternative" news sources can just make up vicious lies about celebrities and their supposed worship of Satan. Sometimes its real. Most of the time it's a hoax. Better keep that in mind.

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/mi...worship-satan/

    Did Miley Cyrus Tell Fans to Worship Satan If They Want to Be Rich and Famous?

    Claim:

    Pop singer Miley Cyrus told a group of fans to worship Satan if they want to be rich and famous like their heroes.

    Rating:
    False

    Origin
    In December 2018, two dubious websites regurgitated a year-old report saying that pop songstress Miley Cyrus had instructed her fans to “Worship Satan if you want to be rich and famous like me.”

    Killuminati (whose slogan is “Exposing The New World Order Illuminati”) and Prepare for Change (whose exact purpose we were unable to decipher) published identically-worded articles recounting an alleged backstage exchange between Cyrus and a fan:

    Miley Cyrus left her followers shocked and confused after advising her young fans to “worship Satan” if they want to become “rich & famous” like their heroes. The former Hannah Montana star left a group of fans bewildered after passing on the “pearls of wisdom” when asked for tips on how to gain success in the entertainment industry.

    Following filming the NBC TV talent show, The Voice, on which Cyrus is one of the judges, a flock of young admirers had gathered outside the backstage exit, hoping to catch a glimpse of their idol. As the Wrecking Ball singer made her way out of the exit with her security team, one of her star-struck fans asked her: “Hey Miley, do you have any advice for any of your fans that might want to follow in your footsteps and become a star?”

    To which she responded: “Yeah: If you wanna be famous, and rich, it’s easy… “But don’t ask me, you need to ask Satan. “You can have it all.” As a nervous laugh spread through the crowd, Cyrus stopped her bodyguards, seemingly annoyed by the response, and turned back to the crowd saying: “You think I’m joking?”

    You asked me how to make it as a pop star and I just told you everything you need to do. “If you want everything that I have, then all you have to do is ask Satan for it and you can have it. “You need to stop asking Santa for Christmas presents and praying to Jesus because none of them exist. “Satan is our Lord, and when you let him into your heart and worship him instead of your make-believe God, then you can have it all.”

    The article originally appeared on 4 December 2017 on Neon Nettle, a disreputable website best known for hawking conspiracy theories and fabricated news items. It was subsequently deleted without explanation.


    In the past, Neon Nettle has displayed a particular fondness for publishing made-up stories linking celebrities to Satanism. Another December 2017 article alleged, for example, that former child actor Macauley Culkin said Hollywood is run by “Satanic pedophiles,” one of whom boasted that his shoes were made from the skin of a deceased child actress. A November 2017 article purported to quote musician Jay-Z about his supposed allegiance to “our true lord, Satan.” Neither had any factual basis, and both were subsequently deleted.

    The article about Cyrus not only accused her of worshiping Satan but repeated the false claims about Jay-Z:

    Just recently, hip-hop star Jay-Z also opened up about his devotion to Lucifer, by telling fans that “God created Lucifer to be the bearer of truth and light,” before declaring that “only idiots believe in Jesus.”

    Neon Nettle cited no sources to support any of these claims about Jay-Z or Cyrus. Nor have we found evidence elsewhere that either of these celebrities is an avowed Satan worshiper or has ever advocated Satan worship to fans. According to news reports, Cyrus was born into a devout Christian family and raised a Southern Baptist, although she has rarely spoken of her religious affiliation since becoming famous.

    One of those rare moments occurred in 2010, when Cyrus told Parade magazine that she remains a practicing Christian:

    “My faith is very important to me,” she says. “But I don’t necessarily define my faith by going to church every Sunday. Because now when I go to church, I feel like it’s a show. There are always cameras outside. I am very spiritual in my own way. Let me make it clear, though — I am a Christian. Jesus is who saved me. He’s what keeps me full and whole. But everyone is entitled to what they believe and what keeps them full. Hopefully, I can influence people and help them follow the same path I am on, but it is not my job to tell people what they are doing wrong.”

    People can change their minds about their faith, of course, but given its provenance we find no reason to take the claim that Cyrus has turned to worshiping Satan as gospel.


    Sources
    Greenberg, Jay. “Miley Cyrus: ‘Worship Satan If You Want to Be Rich & Famous Like Me.'”
    Neon Nettle. 4 December 2017.
    Morgan, Edward. “Miley Cyrus Says Worship Satan If You Want to Be Rich & Famous Like Me.”
    Prepare for Change. 9 December 2018.
    Notaro, Vicki. “Miley Cyrus: Good Girl Gone Bad.”
    Irish Independent. 28 August 2013.
    Sessums, Kevin. “Miley Cyrus: ‘I Know Who I Am Now.'”
    Parade. 21 March 2010.
    Killuminati. “Miley Cyrus Says Worship Satan If You Want to Be Rich & Famous Like Me.”
    7 December 2018.
    By David Emery

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