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Thread: Good News!

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    Good News!

    We have a chaos and a pissed thread, how about a good news one?



    Simple Solution Provides the Homeless With Housing and Jobs in One Fell Swoop


    Chris Fenlay is the mastermind behind a revolutionary nonprofit called Shelters to Shutters.

    The program has a simple premise: many real-estate companies offer discounted (and sometimes free) rent to property managers and staffers who live on their properties and housing complexes.

    So as a means of providing income and housing to the homeless, Shelters to Shutters is partnering with private companies and nonprofits by connecting them with people who are living in poverty. By conducting hiring fairs in multiple cities, the nonprofit simultaneously connects the homeless with housing managers and persuades ever more real estate companies to participate in their program.

    Homeless people are potential employees who are actually incredibly reliable. The industry’s usual turnover rate is 50%, but the employees hired through Shelters to Shutters has a retention rate of 87%.

    The deal is not-one sided, either—in addition to the companies receiving very loyal workers, the fresh employees receive a 77% discount on their rent; 89% of them have received raises or promotions; and 93% have not reentered homeless aid services.


    (I like the goodnewsnetwork, and I will go to other sources as well)

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    Crouching Tiger, Giving Fortune

    Chow Yun-Fat, the beloved movie star from Hong Kong, has recently announced that he will be giving away his entire fortune to charity.

    The 63-year-old celebrity and philanthropist has starred in such films as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; A Better Tomorrow; and The Replacement Killers.

    Though he has accumulated a staggering net worth of $714 million over the course of his career, he apparently has no need for such wealth.

    He and his wife say that they plan on giving the fortune away to a number of charities, in addition to their own charity, which they have managed for several years.

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    Wow, besides being a good actor he's a good person too! I like the idea of this thread.

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    Quote Originally posted by Wind View Post
    I like the idea of this thread.
    me too. thx DT. and thx to all in advance who will keep it keeping on...

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    Well, not to bring it down but I wonder how I could get on Chow's mailing list...

    Just kidding... Nice idea...and you know what...it almost seems harder to contribute here than on some of the other threads....

    How about I recommend a good book in the interest of sensitivity training...Some might profit.

    PastWatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus by Orson Scott Card.

    p.s. I think it was the 2nd time I read it or perhaps another one of the series
    Last edited by NotAPretender, 26th October 2018 at 00:51.
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    A 13-year-old boy has just been named America’s Next Top Young Scientist in recognition of his ingenious method for making pancreatic cancer treatment more effective.

    Rishab Jain was awarded the prize for creating an algorithm that used artificial intelligence to accurately locate and target the pancreas in real-time during a cancer patient’s MRI radiotherapy.


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    Hey Fred, do you know this place?

    Why This Refugee-Owned Falafel House in Tennessee Was Voted the Nicest Place in America


    Just a few days before Christmas 2017, dozens gathered at the Nativity scene at the First Baptist Church in downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, to march to nearby Market Square to hold a rally and a vigil to “welcome the stranger,” a Christian call to treat friends, neighbors, strangers and even enemies with love and compassion.

    One of the people there was Yassin Terou, a refugee who came to Knoxville in 2011 and has since become a beloved local celebrity.

    But not beloved by all.

    A man in the crowd draped in an American flag was yelling at anyone who would listen that immigrants were preventing him from getting a job. When it was Terou’s turn to speak at the rally, he invited the man up on stage so they could hold the flag high together. When the man refused, Terou went into the crowd to find him so he could introduce himself and offer to buy him dinner so they could talk.

    He also offered the man a job.

    That’s because Terou is the owner and operator of Yassin’s Falafel House, which employs 30 people and has been open for the past four years.

    “I always do that,” Terou told Reader’s Digest, “I always invite anyone who hates us to the store. I want them to know us more. When you break bread, you break hate.

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    Quote Originally posted by NotAPretender View Post
    Well, not to bring it down but I wonder how I could get on Chow's mailing list...

    Just kidding... Nice idea...and you know what...it almost seems harder to contribute here than on some of the other threads....

    How about I recommend a good book in the interest of sensitivity training...Some might profit.

    PastWatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus by Orson Scott Card.

    p.s. I think it was the 2nd time I read it or perhaps another one of the series
    Don't mean to derail the great idea of good news.

    I remember when I read that book. It was such a very interesting idea because in that book, it discussed what might have occurred if the proponents of human sacrifice had been able to dominate the world.

    Sometime in the future, humanity invents a series of machines which allow them to view events in their past. Tagiri is a researcher at Pastwatch, the organization in charge of these machines. Her special interest is in the colonization of the Caribbean and the life of Christopher Columbus. One day she accidentally discovers that the machines may be used to send information backwards in time. Unsure about what to do with this knowledge she is nonetheless put in charge of a project to explore it along with her husband Hassan. They are eventually joined by their daughter Diko.

    A parallel narrative tells of Columbus' efforts to secure financial and political backing for his voyage across the Atlantic. Tagiri and other researchers note that Columbus had always yearned for greatness but that as a young man he had been determined to head east in a new Crusade to liberate from the Muslims the Holy Land as well as Constantinople, whose fall was a recent and painful event to Europeans of Columbus' generation. Columbus only changed his mind and decided to head west across the Atlantic after nearly drowning in a storm.

    The mystery of exactly why Columbus changed his mind is solved by Diko. She uses a new, and more visually sensitive, version of the time viewer and discovers that after surviving the wreck Columbus received a vision directing him to head west to convert the people who lived on a previous undiscovered continent. The researchers realize that this vision is actually a hologram sent back in time by people from an alternate timeline in order to influence the direction of Columbus' life.

    Realizing that someone has already changed the timeline they try to figure out what might have been different if Columbus had headed east instead of west. The answer is provided by Hunahpu, an Amerindian researcher with Pastwatch. He argues that in the original timeline, the Europeans exhausted themselves in the anti-Muslim crusade propagated by Columbus, and meanwhile across the ocean the Tlaxcalan Empire of Central America grew powerful enough to invade the weakened Europe, subjecting the continent to a harsh regime of human sacrifice. Eventually, the Tlaxcalans underwent an Industrial Revolution and developed advanced weapons which enabled them to conquer the entire world - still without changing their bloodthirsty religion. In order to undo that atrocity, the Pastwatch's counterparts from the original timeline sent the hologram back to direct Columbus, the greatest man of his era, to head west. The European conquest of the Americas thereby neutralized the threat - but at the price of untold suffering for the Native Americans, trampled under the European conquest.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pastwa...opher_Columbus
    The other day I was reading an older article that was about the extent of human sacrifice and cannibalism REALLY employed by the mesoamericans when the Spanish conquistidors arrived in Mexico.

    THE GOOD NEWS IS HUMAN SACRIFICE and CANNIBALISM ARE NOT CULTURALLY ACCEPTABLE.

    Human sacrifice was meant to appease the appetites of the gods -- and of the Aztecs themselves


    On the morning of November 8, 1519, a small band of bearded, dirty, exhausted Spanish adventurers stood at the edge of a great inland lake in central Mexico, staring in disbelief at the sight before them. Rising from the center of the lake was a magnificent island city, shining chalk white in the early sun. Stretching over the lake were long causeways teeming with travelers to and from the metropolis. Tenochtitlán, the capital of the Aztec empire, now known as Mexico City.

    The Spaniards, under the command of Hernán Cortés, were fresh from the wars of the Mediterranean and the conquest of the Caribbean. tough and ruthless men, number fewer than four hundred, they had fought their way up from the eastern tropical coast of Mexico. Many had been wounded or killed in battles with hostile Indians on the long march. Possibly all would have died but for their minuscule cavalry of fifteen horses -- which terrified the Indians, who thought the animals were gods -- and the aid of a small army of Indian allies, enemies of the Aztecs.

    The panorama of the Aztec citadel across the water seemed to promise the Spaniards the riches that had eluded them all their lives. One of them, Bernal Díaz dell Castillo, later wrote: "To many of us it appeared doubtful whether we were asleep or awake . . . never yet did man see, hear, or dream of anything equal to our eyes this day." For the Spaniards, it was a vision of heaven.

    Slightly more than a year and half later, in the early summer of 1521, it was a glimpse of hell. Again the Spaniards found themselves on the lakeshore, looking toward the great capital. But this time they had just been driven back from the city by the Aztec army. Sixty-two of their companions had been captured, and Cortés and the other survivors helplessly watched a pageant being enacted a mile away across the water on one of the major temple-pyramids of the city. As Bernal Díaz later described it.

    "The dismal drum of Huichilobos sounded again, accompanied by conches, horns, and trumpet-like instruments. It was a terrifying sound, and when we looked at the tall cue [temple-pyramid] from which it came we saw our comrades who had been captured in Cortés defeat being dragged up the steps to be sacrificed. When they had hauled them up to a small platform in front of the shrine where they kept their accursed idols we saw them put plumes on the heads of many of them; and then they made them dance with a sort of fan in front of Huichilobos. Then after they had danced the papas [Aztec priests] laid them down on their backs on some narrow stones of sacrifice and, cutting open their chests, drew out their palpitating hearts which they offered to the idols before them."

    Cortés and his men were the only Europeans to see the human sacrifices of the Aztecs, for the practice ended shortly after the successful Spanish conquest of the Aztec empire. But since the sixteenth century, Aztec sacrifice has persisted in puzzling scholars. No human society known to history approached that of the Aztecs in the quantities of people offered as religious sacrifices: 20,000 a year is a common estimate.

    A typical anthropological explanation is that the religion of the Aztecs required human sacrifices; that their gods demanded these extravagant, frequent offerings. This explanation fails to suggest why that particular form of religion should have evolved when and where it did. I suggest that the Aztec sacrifices, and the cultural patterns surrounding them, were a natural result of distinctive ecological circumstances.

    Some of the Aztecs' ecological circumstances were common to ancient civilizations in general. Recent theoretical work in anthropology indicates that the rise of early civilizations was a consequence of the pressures that growing populations brought to bear on natural resources. As human populations slowly multiplied, even before the development of plant and animal domestication, they gradually reduced the wild flora and fauna available for food and disrupted the ecological equilibriums of their environments. The earliest strong evidence of humans causing environmental damage was the extinction of many big game species in Europe by about 10,000 B.C., and in America north of Mexico by about 9,000 B.C. Simultaneously, human populations in broad regions of the Old and New Worlds had to shift increasingly to marine food resources and small-game hunting. Finally, declining quantities of wild game and food plants made domestication of plants and animals essential in most regions of the planet.

    In the Old World, domestication of herbivorous mammals, such as cattle, sheep, and pigs, proceeded apace with that of food plants. By about 7,200 B.C. in the New World, however, ancient hunters had completely eliminated herbivores suitable for domestication from the area anthropologists call Mesoamerica, the region of the future high civilizations of Mexico and Guatemala. Only in the Andean region and southern South America did some camel-related species, especially the llama and the alpaca, manage to survive hunters' onslaughts, and thus could be domesticated later, along with another important local herbivore, the guinea pig. In Mesoamerica, the guinea pig was not available, and the Camelidae species became extinct several thousand years before domesticated food production had to be seriously undertaken. Dogs, such as the Mexican hairless, and wildfowl, such as the turkey, had to be bred for protein. The dog, however, was a far from satisfactory solution because, as a carnivore, it competed with its breeders for animal protein.

    The need for intensified domesticated food production was felt early, as anthropologist Robert Carneiro has pointed out, by growing populations in fertile localities circumscribed by terrain poorly suited to farming. In such cases, plants always became domesticated, climate and environment permitting, but herbivorous mammals apparently could not, unless appropriate species existed. In Mesoamerica, the Valley of Mexico, with its fertile and well-watered bottomlands surrounded by mountains, fits well Carneiro's environmental model. In this confined area, population was increasing up to the time of the Spanish conquest, and the supply of wild game was declining. Deer were nearly gone from the Valley by the Aztec period.

    The Aztecs responded to their increasing problems of food supply by intensifying agricultural production with a variety of ingenious techniques, including the reclamation of soil from marsh and lake bottoms in the chinampa, or floating garden, method. Unfortunately, their ingenuity could not correct their lack of a suitable domesticable herbivore that could provide animal protein and fats. Hence, the ecological situation of the Aztecs and their Mesoamerican neighbors was unique among the world's major civilizations. I have recently proposed the theory that large-scale cannibalism, disguised as sacrifice, was the natural consequence of these ecological circumstances.

    The contrast between Mesoamerica and the Andes, in terms of the existence of domesticated herbivores, was also reflected in the numbers of human victims sacrificed in the two areas. In the huge Andean Inca empire, the other major political entity in the New world at the time of the conquest, annual human sacrifices apparently amounted to a few hundred at most. Among the Aztecs, the numbers were incomparably greater. The commonly mentioned figure of 20,000, however, is unreliable. For example, one sixteenth-century account states that 20,000 were sacrificed yearly in the capital city alone, another reports this as 20,000 infants, and a third claims the same number as being slaughtered throughout the Aztec empire on a single particular day. The most famous specific sacrifice took place in 1487 at the dedication of the main pyramid in Tenochtitlán. Here, too, figures vary: one source states 20,000, another 72,344, and several give 80,400.

    In 1946 Sherburne Cook, a demographer specializing in American Indian populations, estimated an over-all annual mean of 15,000 victims in a central Mexican population reckoned at two million. Later, however, he and his colleague Woodrow Borah revised his estimate of the total central Mexican population upward to 25 million. Recently, Borah, possibly the leading authority on the demography of Mexico at the time of the conquest, has also revised the estimated number of persons sacrificed in central Mexico in the fifteenth century to 250,000 per year, equivalent to one percent of the total population. According to Borah, this figure is consistent with the sacrifice of an estimated 1,000 to 3,000 persons yearly at the largest of the thousands of temples scattered throughout the Aztec Triple Alliance. The numbers, of course, were fewer at the lesser temples, and may have shaded down to zero at the smallest.

    These enormous numbers call for consideration of what the Aztecs did with the bodies after the sacrifices. Evidence of Aztec cannibalism has been largely ignored or consciously or unconsciously covered up. For example, the major twentieth-century books on the Aztecs barely mention it; others bypass the subject completely. Probably some modern Mexicans and anthropologists have been embarrassed by the topic: the former partly for nationalistic reasons; the latter partly out of a desire to portray native peoples in the best possible light. Ironically, both these attitudes may represent European ethnocentrism regarding cannibalism -- a viewpoint to be expected from a culture that has had relatively abundant livestock for meat and milk.

    A search of the sixteenth-century literature, however, leaves no doubt as to the prevalence of cannibalism among the central Mexicans. The Spanish conquistadores wrote amply about it, as did several Spanish priests who engaged in ethnological research on Aztec culture shortly after the conquest. Among the latter, Bernardino de Sahagún is of particular interest because his informants were former Aztec nobles, who supplied dictated or written information in the Aztec language, Nahuatl.

    According to these early accounts, some sacrificial victims were not eaten, such as children offered by drowning to the rain god, Tlaloc, or persons suffering skin diseases. But the overwhelming majority of the sacrificed captives apparently were consumed. A principal -- and sometimes only -- objective of Aztec war expeditions was to capture prisoners for sacrifice. While some might be sacrificed and eaten on the field of battle, most were taken to home communities or to the capital, where they were kept in wooden cages to be fattened until sacrificed by the priests at the temple-pyramids. Most of the sacrifices involved tearing out the heart, offering it to the sun and, with some blood, also to the idols. The corpse was then tumbled down the steps of the pyramid and carried off to be butchered. The head went on the local skull rack, displayed in central plazas alongside the temple-pyramids. At least three of the limbs were the property of the captor if he had seized the prisoner without assistance in battle. Later, at a feast given at the captor's quarters, the central dish was a stew of tomatoes, peppers, and the limbs of his victim. The remaining torso, in Tenochtitlán at least, went to the royal zoo where it was used to feed carnivorous mammals, birds, and snakes.

    Recent archeological research leads support to conquistadores' and informants' vivid and detailed accounts of Aztec cannibalism. Mexican archeologists excavating at an Aztec sacrificial site in the Tlatelolco section of Mexico City between 1960 and 1969 uncovered headless human rib cages completely lacking the limb bones. Associated with these remains were some razor-like obsidian blades, which the archeologists believe were used in the butchering. Nearby they also discovered piles of human skulls, which apparently had been broken open to obtain the brains, possibly a choice delicacy reserved for the priesthood, and to mount the skulls on a ceremonial rack.

    Through cannibalism, the Aztecs appear to have been attempting to reduce very particular nutritional deficiencies. Under the conditions of high population pressure and class stratification that characterized the Aztec state, commoners or lower-class persons rarely had the opportunity to eat any game, even the domesticated turkey, except on great occasions. They often had to content themselves with such creatures as worms and snakes and an edible lake-surface scum called "stone dung," which may have been algae fostered by pollution from Tenochtitlán. Preliminary research seems to indicate that although fish and waterfowl were taken from the lakes, most of the Aztec poor did not have significant access to this protein source and were forced to be near-vegetarians, subsisting mainly on domesticated plant foods such a maize and beans.

    The commoners theoretically could get the eight essential amino acids necessary for building body tissues from maize and beans. (A combination of the two foods complement each other in their essential amino acid components.) However, recent nutritional research indicates that in order to assure that their bodies would use the eight essential amino acids to rebuild body tissues, and not simply siphon off the dietary protein as energy, the Aztec commoners would have had to consume large quantities of maize and beans simultaneously or nearly simultaneously year-round. But crop failures and famines were common. According to Durán, a sixteenth-century chronicler, poor people often could not obtain maize and beans in the same season, and hence could not rely upon these plants as a source of the essential amino acids. How did the Aztecs know they needed the essential amino acids? Like other organisms perfected under natural selection, the human body is a homeostatic system that, under conditions of nutritional stress, tends to seek out the dietary elements in which it is deficient. Without this innate capacity, living organisms could not survive.

    Another Aztec dietary problem was the paucity of fats, which were so scarce in central Mexico that the Spaniards resorted to boiling down the bodies of Indians killed in battle in order to obtain fat for dressing wounds and tallow for caulking boats. While the exact amount of fatty acids required by the human body remains a subject of uncertainty among nutritionists, they agree that fats, due to their slower rate of metabolism, provide a longer-lasting energy source than carbohydrates. Fatty meat, by providing not only fat, which the body will use as energy, but also essential proteins, assures the utilization of the essential amino acids for tissue building. Interestingly, prisoners confined by the Aztecs in wooden cages prior to sacrifice would be fed purely on carbohydrates to build up fat.

    In contrast to the commoners, the Aztec elite normally had a diet enriched by wild game imported from the far reaches of the empire where species had not been so depleted. But even nobles could suffer from famines and sometimes had to sell their children into slavery in order to survive. Not surprisingly, the Aztec elite apparently reserved for themselves the right to eat human flesh, and conveniently, times of famine meant that the gods demanded appeasement through many human sacrifices. http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/.../sacrifice.htm
    Remove this post if warranted for derailing.

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    Senior Member NotAPretender's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maggie View Post
    Don't mean to derail the great idea of good news.

    I remember when I read that book. It was such a very interesting idea because in that book, it discussed what might have occurred if the proponents of human sacrifice had been able to dominate the world.



    The other day I was reading an older article that was about the extent of human sacrifice and cannibalism REALLY employed by the mesoamericans when the Spanish conquistidors arrived in Mexico.

    THE GOOD NEWS IS HUMAN SACRIFICE and CANNIBALISM ARE NOT CULTURALLY ACCEPTABLE.



    Remove this post if warranted for derailing.
    I actually had read that at one point and when in college taking an ethics course from a professor/reverend I brought it up. He in no uncertain terms told me I was full of it...
    "We are one thought away from changing the world!"

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    Super Moderator United States Dreamtimer's Avatar
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    We have people in America who talk about 'long pork'.

    No, you didn't derail. It's a sort of good news that we don't have sacrifice and cannibalism. And I can imagine how controversial that would have been to talk about, NAP.

    So...more good news. (Which I especially want after hearing about our dear friend Brook)


    COMPASS Pathways Receives FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Psilocybin Therapy for Treatment-resistant Depression

    The FDA designates a drug as a Breakthrough Therapy if preliminary clinical evidence shows that it may demonstrate substantial improvement over available therapy. Breakthrough Therapies are supported by the FDA throughout the clinical development programme to ensure as efficient a process as possible.

    Treatment-resistant depression is a huge unmet need, affecting 100 million people around the world who do not respond to existing treatments. Depression is one of the fastest growing health problems we face today, and the leading cause of ill-health and disability worldwide. The Breakthrough Therapy designation for psilocybin therapy highlights the importance of supporting early research that can be translated to clinically meaningful outcomes.

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    Super Moderator Norway Elen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer View Post
    We have people in America who talk about 'long pork'.

    No, you didn't derail. It's a sort of good news that we don't have sacrifice and cannibalism. And I can imagine how controversial that would have been to talk about, NAP.

    So...more good news. (Which I especially want after hearing about our dear friend Brook)


    COMPASS Pathways Receives FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Psilocybin Therapy for Treatment-resistant Depression

    The FDA designates a drug as a Breakthrough Therapy if preliminary clinical evidence shows that it may demonstrate substantial improvement over available therapy. Breakthrough Therapies are supported by the FDA throughout the clinical development programme to ensure as efficient a process as possible.

    Treatment-resistant depression is a huge unmet need, affecting 100 million people around the world who do not respond to existing treatments. Depression is one of the fastest growing health problems we face today, and the leading cause of ill-health and disability worldwide. The Breakthrough Therapy designation for psilocybin therapy highlights the importance of supporting early research that can be translated to clinically meaningful outcomes.
    I think that our Dreamtimer should pursue the idea of "Good News" as it would be the most important thing that we look at right now. Please...
    Whatever is true. Whatever is noble. Whatever is right. Whatever is lovely. Whatever is admirable. Anything of excellence and worthy of praise. Dwell on these things. Jesus Christ (I agree)

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    I heard about this on the radio first.

    Stephen King Lets These Kids Make Film Adaption of His Story by Selling the Rights for Just $1

    The story rights were bought by film students from the Blaenau Gwent Film Academy in Tredegar, Wales. School officials initially contacted King’s team about making a film adaption of “Stationary Bike”, one of the short stories that was published in his “Just After Sunset” collection.

    King has spent the last 40 years using the program as a way of boosting the careers of young filmmakers.

    “Around 1977 or so, when I started having some popular success, I saw a way to give back a little of the joy the movies had given me,” King explained, according to BBC.



    The man says he was plagued for years by nightmares and that's where he got most of his storylines. Imagine that. (or not)

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    Breakthrough Tech Can Test for All 307 Bacterial Infections Known to Man – Amazing Advance From Only 19

    In a world first, scientists have just developed a groundbreaking new platform that can test for every single kind of human pathogenic bacteria known to man.

    According to the recently-published study, researchers developed the platform so that it can simultaneously screen for the bacteria strains, as well as markers for virulence and antibiotic resistance.

    The exciting new tool, which is being called the “BacCapSeq” platform, was developed by researchers from the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) in the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

    BacCapSeq contains 4.2 million genetic probes used to detect the signature DNA of all 307 pathogenic bacteria, as well as biomarkers for antibiotic resistance and virulence. Each probe binds to a corresponding sequence; when a particular bacterium and biomarker is present in a sample, a magnetic process “pulls out” its unique sequences, which can then be used to identify the bacterium and its characteristics.

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    Ethiopia just elected its first female President.

    Jeez, man. Now Ethiopia has done it before us.

    Sahel-Work Zewde...is an experienced diplomat who has now become Africa's only female head of state.

    Wow. The only one.

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    When Little Girl With Autism Mistakes Bride for Cinderella, the Internet Rallies to Send Her to Disney World

    Olivia Spark had just tied the knot with her husband Caleb in Akron Falls, New York when they went to a nearby park to take wedding photos.

    As Olivia was posing in her gorgeous white gown, she was suddenly approached by a little girl excitedly yelling: “Cinderella! Cinderella!”

    The exuberant child was 5-year-old Layla Lester. Layla’s mother says that even though Layla’s autism makes it difficult for her to connect with strangers, she was overjoyed to meet a real-life princess in the park.

    Before the new acquaintances bid adieu to each other, Olivia’s wedding photographer, Nicole Wickins, snapped some photos of the sweet exchange.

    Upon sharing them to social media, the heartwarming story was shared dozens of times by local media outlets. People were so touched by the adorable pictures, members of the community created a GoFundMe page to send Layla to Disney World so she can meet more of her favorite princesses. In just 10 days, it has already raised almost $12,000.


    Humans can also be very sweet and caring and giving with no expectations of return.

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