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Thread: Oldest known stone structure may hold a morbid secret

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    Oldest known stone structure may hold a morbid secret

    IT’S 6000 years older than Stonehenge. Its purpose is unknown.
    Its art an enigma. Now the mystery of Göbekli Tepe has taken
    another twist: Was it the heart of an ancient skull cult?


    The mound that contains the megalithic ruins of Göbekli Tepe, near the Syria-Turkey border, has been undergoing excavation since 1995. Since then, almost every new discovery has only added to the questions surrounding this extraordinary place.

    It’s among the oldest known evidence of civilisation itself.

    But archaeologists don’t even know what it was.

    It looks like a place of worship. But did the stone-age hunter-gatherers of the Neolithic era who hewed its distinctive pillars out of the rock more than 11,000 years ago have the same idea of gods as we do?

    We don’t know.

    It wasn’t a settlement. There is little or no sign of people conducting their daily lives there.

    So it was most likely something else that drew people to this place. Something significant.

    Building Göbekli Tepe was itself an extraordinary achievement.

    The T-shaped pillars are the world’s oldest known monumental architecture. Its scale is enormous. The quality of its artwork outstanding.

    Yet these were made at a time when humanity didn’t have metal tools. Even pottery hadn’t yet been invented.

    But ongoing excavations are providing some tantalising hints as to Göbekli Tepe prehistoric purpose.

    Several fragments of skull have recently been unearthed, according to archaeologists at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. And the way they have been gouged and carved is something not seen elsewhere for millennia to come.

    Only three such carved fragments have been found so far. But their 11,000 year preservation offers a new window to the past.

    Their discovery is strong evidence that the dead played a central role among the circular arrays of megalithic pillars at Göbekli Tepe.



    An engraved pillar from Building
    D at Göbekli Tepe.


    SKULL CULT


    “Throughout history, people have valued skulls for different reasons, from ancestor worship to the belief that human skulls transmit protective properties,” the researchers write in a study published this week in the Science Advances journal.


    Images detailing skull fragments and the marks on them from the
    Göbekli Tepe skull study.



    The prevalence of this culturally significant practice has been well documented by modern anthropology.

    Different skull cults have been identified around the world, from the medieval Aztecs of Central America to the mesolithic steppes of Eurasia. Their characteristic practices — such as how they modified the bones — have been carefully catalogued.

    The Göbekli Tepe skull fragments match none of them.

    Researcher Julia Gresky and colleagues examined the Göbekli Tepe partial skulls closely.

    Were the marks caused by animals? Were they the result of natural scrapes and erosion over the eons?


    Some 2000 years later and 700km
    away, a skull cult was active in
    the Neolithic city of Jericho.



    A variety of microscopic tools were brought into play.

    The results removed any doubt.

    “Each skull had intentional deep incisions along its sagittal axes and one of those skulls also displayed a drilled hole in the left parietal bone, as well as red ochre remnants,” the authors say.

    Close inspection of each gouge also revealed them to be consistent with cut marks from stone tools.

    This also eliminated the possibility all of the markings were the product of ‘scalping’. Most were simply too deep.

    But the presence of other minor cut-marks on the bone suggested a process of defleshing — the removal of the skin and hair to expose clean bone as a ‘clean slate’ for their deliberate designs.

    “(Most) likely, the skulls were carved to venerate ancestors not long after their death”, the study authors write, “…or, to put recently “dispatched” enemies on display.”

    GETTING INSIDE ANCIENT HEADS

    Göbekli Tepe is odd. There is no natural water supply nearby. There don’t seem to be any habitable buildings, and almost no domestic tools or products.

    Yet, the Neolithic people invested huge amounts of time and energy building the place.

    Then, suddenly, in the 10th millennium BC — about the time agriculture began to explode across the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East — it was all deliberately buried.


    Anthropomorphic (humanoid) depictions from Göbekli Tepe. (A) An intentionally
    decapitated human statue (height, 60cm). (B) A gift bearer holds in his hands a
    human head (height, 26cm). (C) Pillar 43 (building D) with low relief of an
    ithyphallic headless individual, one arm raised (bottom right).


    This was an enormous undertaking in itself. It also appears to have been culturally significant, as artefacts and sculptures were carefully placed alongside the often richly carved T-shaped pillars as they were covered over.

    Most appear to have been heads intentionally broken off from sculptures or idols — unlike similar objects depicting animals.

    “Human heads seem to have had a special role in the beliefs connected with the enclosures,” the Göbekli Tepe project’s blog ‘The Tepe Telegrams’ reads. “During backfilling of the enclosures, a selection of fragments, mostly heads, was placed inside the filling, most often near the central pillars.“

    Detached heads also feature in Göbekli Tepe’s extensive array of stone relief carvings.

    One central pillar shows a head among animals including a vulture and hyena. Other sculptures show birds and animals carrying or sitting on human heads.

    On anoother pillar, a headless human body (with an erection) is placed among birds, snakes and a scorpion.

    “This practise is highly evocative of elements of neolithic death cults that also reflects in Göbekli Tepe´s iconography,” the researchers say.

    WHAT IS GOBEKLI TEPE?



    Göbekli Tepe’s ‘Southeast-Hollow.’ Much of the mound in southern Turkey
    is yet to be excavated.


    “At Göbekli Tepe we do not know very much about the actual use of the buildings,” the Tepe Telegrams blog states. “We have however the enclosures themselves, their layout, and the richly decorated pillars as starting points. And we know a lot of the things people did with these enclosures at the end of their uselife.”

    The large, circular-arrayed central T-shaped pillars — some as high as 5.5m — are often depicted as abstract, clothed human bodies as seen from the side. Smaller, similar pillars surrounding them are more often richly decorated with animals.

    “(These) are always ‘looking’ towards the central pillars, and the benches between them further amplify the impression of a gathering of some sort,” the researchers write.

    They speculate the deliberately abstract human design places the central pillars ‘in another sphere’ to that of other, more naturalistic, nearby carvings.

    Are these ‘pillar-beings’ significant?

    “Whether we are dealing with depictions of ancestors of different importance, or even of gods, would be a topic for itself and an answer is hard to find at the moment,” the researchers write.

    But the concept of culturally significant, communal mausoleums is not uncommon in prehistory. And there is plenty of evidence of human head cults in the stone age.

    It would not be unreasonable to speculate that Göbekli Tepe could have been the ritual centre of an enormous hunter-gatherer death-cult, where the skulls of the recently deceased were ritually passed from this world to an idealised, ancestor-based afterlife.

    The oldest known evidence of religion.





    Source:
    http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/the-wo...6efa88e02e13a3


    peace...
    ~~ One foot in the Ancient World and the other in the Now ~~
    ~~ 'cuse me while I kiss the sky... Jimi Hendrix ~~
    ~~ Never stop looking for what's not there ~~
    ~~ Our past is just a story we tell ourselves ~~

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    Wizard, nice write up. You do good work!
    "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the object of your anger to die” ~ Anon
    "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." ~Yogi Berra
    "You can observe a lot by just watching." ~Yogi Berra
    “When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.” ~Will Rogers
    "If life gives you melons...you might be dyslexic" ~ Aixelsyd Dnarber

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    I'm of the opinion that human sacrifice has played such a constant role in the past of modern man that the collecting of skulls would hardly be considered morbid if taken in the proper context.
    I like to give our ancestors the benefit of the doubt, I never like to assume they were just superstitious and doing what they do on a flimsy whim.
    I do not look at our ancestors as less intelligent than the modern version, far from it. In fact I'm quite of the opinion that these folks were vastly intelligent for the most part.
    I'm very interested in such ancient Neolithic sites and I would love to see the true data coming from these digs, unfortunately I do not believe the public at large will ever be able to see the real data.
    I'm amazed that Gobekli Tepe was ever allowed into the mainstream knowledge base.
    It seems to me that given the age, there may be links uncovered that shed light on such ancient mysteries as Atlantis.

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    Quote Originally posted by DNA View Post
    I'm of the opinion that human sacrifice has played such a constant role in the past of modern man that the collecting of skulls would hardly be considered morbid if taken in the proper context.
    I like to give our ancestors the benefit of the doubt, I never like to assume they were just superstitious and doing what they do on a flimsy whim.
    I do not look at our ancestors as less intelligent than the modern version, far from it. In fact I'm quite of the opinion that these folks were vastly intelligent for the most part.
    I'm very interested in such ancient Neolithic sites and I would love to see the true data coming from these digs, unfortunately I do not believe the public at large will ever be able to see the real data.
    I'm amazed that Gobekli Tepe was ever allowed into the mainstream knowledge base.
    It seems to me that given the age, there may be links uncovered that shed light on such ancient mysteries as Atlantis.
    Yes, but you really don't see anything in the MSM about it. Totally ignored as well is the ramification the entire main-stream archeological record and "science" is bogus.
    "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the object of your anger to die” ~ Anon
    "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." ~Yogi Berra
    "You can observe a lot by just watching." ~Yogi Berra
    “When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.” ~Will Rogers
    "If life gives you melons...you might be dyslexic" ~ Aixelsyd Dnarber

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    Senior Member Aianawa's Avatar
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    An engraved pillar from Building
    D at Göbekli Tepe.


    Is a new way of seeing the hand basket, represented around the world, this time in three phases, a different animal represented on each basket.

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    It is amazing to me that our ancient ancestors had the skillful technology to build the wonders they built but then had the brutality to sacrifice other human beings with no remorse.

    Was it ETs teaching the technology and then punishing the disobedient or showing their authority as a King and when they left they appointed one and he continued their practice and didn't know any better.



    Keeps me researching!
    ~~ One foot in the Ancient World and the other in the Now ~~
    ~~ 'cuse me while I kiss the sky... Jimi Hendrix ~~
    ~~ Never stop looking for what's not there ~~
    ~~ Our past is just a story we tell ourselves ~~

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    I think the skull "cult' was a form of veneration of ancestors and their skulls were kept as "fetish" objects. Sacrifice is about appeasing angry gods and was not a part of antiquity. That part of history that is hidden from us. We must stop allowing scientists to interpret history for us or we will continue view our illustrious ancestors as brutes who needed "laws" to control them. Scientism is the new religion for people who left organized religions. Throw the new age in as another religion for those who abandoned "traditional" religions. It's all social engineering thousands of years in the making.
    "To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize" -- Voltaire

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    Senior Member Amanda's Avatar
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    How do we know whether the skulls were from living sacrifices? Perhaps the skulls came from those who had died???

    Much Respect - Amanda

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    Quote Originally posted by modwiz View Post
    I think the skull "cult' was a form of veneration of ancestors and their skulls were kept as "fetish" objects. Sacrifice is about appeasing angry gods and was not a part of antiquity.
    Sacrifice is a multifaceted practice the extent of which I will not pretend to know nor will I believe most folks who say they do.
    The archeology and studies of various religions and cults bares out the practice of human sacrifice to be the norm and almost never the exception.
    The ancient Atlanteans were doing it at the height of their culture.

    I'll be honest, I'm not quick to judge.
    We are far worse now than any of our ancestors were.
    We all sit glued to our TV's watching the bombs drop on Baghdad and laughing off Madelyne Allbright when she talks about a conservative 500,000 children dying in Iraq alone and that being worth it for regime change.
    And the tens of millions of people who have died since in the name of regime change in Libya, Afghanistan and the creation of Isis and the damage being done to Syria.
    Who is to say what is worse? Killing off a few folks via human sacrifice may disconnect or appease archon control in so far as a culture or society is concerned, maybe the ancients knew what they were doing in this regard.
    I don't know, but it is certainly no worse than our fully archon controlled present society which now feels entitled to feed on the deaths of millions and to be able to sacrifice people on an industrial level so long as we imply a terrorist connotation.

    I think this Tool song sums up what I'm trying to say.

    Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUXBCdt5IPg


    "Vicarious"


    Eye on the TV
    'cause tragedy thrills me
    Whatever flavour
    It happens to be like;
    Killed by the husband
    Drowned by the ocean
    Shot by his own son
    She used the poison in his tea
    And kissed him goodbye
    That's my kind of story
    It's no fun 'til someone dies

    Don't look at me like
    I am a monster
    Frown out your one face
    But with the other
    Stare like a junkie
    Into the TV
    Stare like a zombie
    While the mother
    Holds her child
    Watches him die
    Hands to the sky crying
    Why, oh why?
    'cause I need to watch things die
    From a distance

    Vicariously I, live while the whole world dies
    You all need it too, don't lie

    Why can't we just admit it?
    Why can't we just admit it?

    We won't give pause until the blood is flowing
    Neither the brave nor bold
    The writers of stories sold
    We won't give pause until the blood is flowing

    I need to watch things die
    From a good safe distance

    Vicariously I, live while the whole world dies
    You all feel the same so
    Why can't we just admit it?

    Blood like rain come down
    Drawn on grave and ground

    Part vampire
    Part warrior
    Carnivore and voyeur
    Stare at the transmittal
    Sing to the death rattle

    La, la, la, la, la, la, la-lie

    Credulous at best, your desire to believe in angels in the hearts of men.
    Pull your head on out your hippy haze and give a listen.
    Shouldn't have to say it all again.
    The universe is hostile. so Impersonal. devour to survive.
    So it is. So it's always been.

    We all feed on tragedy
    It's like blood to a vampire

    Vicariously I, live while the whole world dies
    Much better you than I
    Last edited by DNA, 2nd July 2017 at 08:47.

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    Quote Originally posted by modwiz View Post
    I think the skull "cult' was a form of veneration of ancestors and their skulls were kept as "fetish" objects. Sacrifice is about appeasing angry gods and was not a part of antiquity. That part of history that is hidden from us. We must stop allowing scientists to interpret history for us or we will continue view our illustrious ancestors as brutes who needed "laws" to control them. Scientism is the new religion for people who left organized religions. Throw the new age in as another religion for those who abandoned "traditional" religions. It's all social engineering thousands of years in the making.
    I have instructed the GF, should I predecease her, to put my ashes in a Steuban Art Glass Vase (with gold inside lining) and place the vase on a fireplace mantel in the house. This is so I can continue to keep the dark spirits at bay and become a "fetish" object.
    "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the object of your anger to die” ~ Anon
    "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." ~Yogi Berra
    "You can observe a lot by just watching." ~Yogi Berra
    “When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.” ~Will Rogers
    "If life gives you melons...you might be dyslexic" ~ Aixelsyd Dnarber

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    Senior Member Amanda's Avatar
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    Dumpster Diver - You make me smile. I want to be cremated and have my ashes scattered into the wind - that way I will be EVERYWHERE. Well that is the plan for me at least.

    DNA - You are correct, well I comprehend and understand your comments. I still think that we are yet to ascertain whether the skulls were derived from actual sacrifice or from being a keepsake, as it were, from the deceased bodies of those who belonged to their tribe???

    I understand that Human sacrifice is practiced - I certainly do not condone it nor would I participate in any type of Human sacrifice - but - there is some information and evidence that suggests Human sacrifice is not what was happening. I cite an example contained within a documentary I purchased some years ago. One aspect is the South American Aztecs - at the end of the video presentation on their culture it states: It is as if they just got up and walked away.

    The comment comes from the fact that no human remains were found in or around the site. No mass deaths from possibly a bacterial infection or an invasion where outsiders murdered everyone. No human remains hmmm....

    I imagine the one thing we can agree on is this: Our History has many gaps and many aspects that need information and evidence. It is there - we just have to find it all. Like putting together an enormous multilayered and multifaceted and multidimensional jigsaw. Hmmmm ....

    Much Respect & Much Peace - Amanda

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    Quote Originally posted by Amanda View Post
    Dumpster Diver - You make me smile. I want to be cremated and have my ashes scattered into the wind - that way I will be EVERYWHERE. Well that is the plan for me at least.

    DNA - You are correct, well I comprehend and understand your comments. I still think that we are yet to ascertain whether the skulls were derived from actual sacrifice or from being a keepsake, as it were, from the deceased bodies of those who belonged to their tribe???

    I understand that Human sacrifice is practiced - I certainly do not condone it nor would I participate in any type of Human sacrifice - but - there is some information and evidence that suggests Human sacrifice is not what was happening. I cite an example contained within a documentary I purchased some years ago. One aspect is the South American Aztecs - at the end of the video presentation on their culture it states: It is as if they just got up and walked away.

    The comment comes from the fact that no human remains were found in or around the site. No mass deaths from possibly a bacterial infection or an invasion where outsiders murdered everyone. No human remains hmmm....

    I imagine the one thing we can agree on is this: Our History has many gaps and many aspects that need information and evidence. It is there - we just have to find it all. Like putting together an enormous multilayered and multifaceted and multidimensional jigsaw. Hmmmm ....

    Much Respect & Much Peace - Amanda
    We aim to please. However, the GF has rejected the idea: too morbid. Perhaps we can compromise with placing me in the "Man Cave" where I can watch football games instead of fireplace mantle.
    "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the object of your anger to die” ~ Anon
    "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." ~Yogi Berra
    "You can observe a lot by just watching." ~Yogi Berra
    “When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.” ~Will Rogers
    "If life gives you melons...you might be dyslexic" ~ Aixelsyd Dnarber

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    Quote Originally posted by Dumpster Diver View Post
    We aim to please. However, the GF has rejected the idea: too morbid. Perhaps we can compromise with placing me in the "Man Cave" where I can watch football games instead of fireplace mantle.
    I used to want to be cremated and I'm all good with it but a few things caused me to pause.
    Edgar Cayce states that your bones store certain memories and those memories can be accessed by your essence when it visits earth if those bones are still here.
    I thought that was crazy for several reasons but it's Edgar Cayce and who the ef am I? Right?
    Carlos Castaneda has mentioned that certain aspects of a person are stored in their bones as well.
    Also I remember a story where someone was asking Edgar Cayce for the exact location of the fabled "Lost Dutchman Mine" in the Superstition Mountains of Arizona.
    Cayce replied that the mine was located in the vicinity of a hallowed Apache burial ground, and that the Apache warriors of old, their spirits rather still guard the area and that they do their best to ward off and even molest those who would attempt to discover this mine.
    For this reason Cayce stated he would not help the individual find the gold mine.
    I had personally never believed that old spirits would guard a burial ground, and I really never believed in old Native American burial grounds having bad mojo or anything, but again it is Edgar Cayce and if there is one guy who has earned the title of heed his advice it would be him.

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    Indigenous Americans have been trying to recover their bones for generations.

    Elephants revere the bones of their fallen.

    The giants' bones have been taken and hidden or 'lost'. I wonder what stories they contain?

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    Quote Originally posted by DNA View Post
    I used to want to be cremated and I'm all good with it but a few things caused me to pause.
    Edgar Cayce states that your bones store certain memories and those memories can be accessed by your essence when it visits earth if those bones are still here.
    I thought that was crazy for several reasons but it's Edgar Cayce and who the ef am I? Right?
    Carlos Castaneda has mentioned that certain aspects of a person are stored in their bones as well.
    Also I remember a story where someone was asking Edgar Cayce for the exact location of the fabled "Lost Dutchman Mine" in the Superstition Mountains of Arizona.
    Cayce replied that the mine was located in the vicinity of a hallowed Apache burial ground, and that the Apache warriors of old, their spirits rather still guard the area and that they do their best to ward off and even molest those who would attempt to discover this mine.
    For this reason Cayce stated he would not help the individual find the gold mine.
    I had personally never believed that old spirits would guard a burial ground, and I really never believed in old Native American burial grounds having bad mojo or anything, but again it is Edgar Cayce and if there is one guy who has earned the title of heed his advice it would be him.
    Quote Originally posted by Dreamtimer View Post
    Indigenous Americans have been trying to recover their bones for generations.

    Elephants revere the bones of their fallen.

    The giants' bones have been taken and hidden or 'lost'. I wonder what stories they contain?
    OK, DNA and Dreamy you've convinced me. The GF now has instructions to put my bones in a sealed box in the Man Cave.

    ...it'll save on those outrageous burial fees as well...
    "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the object of your anger to die” ~ Anon
    "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." ~Yogi Berra
    "You can observe a lot by just watching." ~Yogi Berra
    “When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.” ~Will Rogers
    "If life gives you melons...you might be dyslexic" ~ Aixelsyd Dnarber

  30. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Dumpster Diver For This Useful Post:

    Aragorn (5th July 2017), DNA (5th July 2017), Dreamtimer (5th July 2017)

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