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View Full Version : Paris zoo unveils the "blob", an organism with no brain but 720 sexes



Aragorn
17th October 2019, 14:29
Source: Reuters (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-zoo-blob/paris-zoo-unveils-the-blob-an-organism-with-no-brain-but-720-sexes-idUSKBN1WV2AD)




https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fstatic.interestingengineering.com %2Fimages%2Fuploads%2Fsizes%2Fslimemold_resize_md. jpg&f=1&nofb=1



PARIS (Reuters) - A Paris zoo showcased a mysterious new organism on Wednesday, dubbed the “blob”, a yellowish unicellular small living being which looks like a fungus but acts like an animal.

This newest exhibit of the Paris Zoological Park, which goes on display to the public on Saturday, has no mouth, no stomach, no eyes, yet it can detect food and digest it.

The blob also has almost 720 sexes, can move without legs or wings and heals itself in two minutes if cut in half.

“The blob is a living being which belongs to one of nature’s mysteries”, said Bruno David, director of the Paris Museum of Natural History, of which the Zoological Park is part.

“It surprises us because it has no brain but is able to learn (...) and if you merge two blobs, the one that has learned will transmit its knowledge to the other,” David added.

The blob was named after a 1958 science-fiction horror B-movie, starring a young Steve McQueen, in which an alien life form - The Blob - consumes everything in its path in a small Pennsylvania town.

“We know for sure it is not a plant but we don’t really if it’s an animal or a fungus,” said David.

“It behaves very surprisingly for something that looks like a mushroom (...) it has the behavior of an animal, it is able to learn.”


Source: Reuters (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-france-zoo-blob/paris-zoo-unveils-the-blob-an-organism-with-no-brain-but-720-sexes-idUSKBN1WV2AD)

PurpleLama
17th October 2019, 14:44
It is true that much about fungal life forms is not well understood, if at all. It can be argued that a network of mycelium beneath the soil functions like something between a neural system and a cardiovascular system. Indeed, it is the foundation of companion planting, without the fungus the compounds produced of one plant would often not reach the other which may benefit from them.

Fascinating stuff.

Someone ought to get a piece of this blob to Paul Stamets!

Dreamtimer
17th October 2019, 19:17
I'm fascinated by 'le blob'.

https://media.wtsp.com/assets/WTSP/images/fb2455f3-1382-40e1-8b3e-320bccb0f9da/fb2455f3-1382-40e1-8b3e-320bccb0f9da_360x203.jpg

This one has the frog personality showing, lower right.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/polopoly_fs/1.4642461.1571318369!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_800/image.jpg


Meet the "blob", also known by its scientific name Physarum polycephalum or "many-headed slime".


It appears stationary, but does cover ground—at a leisurely pace of up to one centimetre (0.4 inches) per hour—in search of prey, such as mushroom spores, bacteria, and other microbes.


Mostly yellow, but also in varieties of red, white or pink, the blob is found most often on decaying leaves and tree trunks in cool, moist spots such as woods.


Long considered a fungus, the blob was reclassified in the 1990s in the group of myxomycetes or slime moulds, a subcategory of the amoeba family.

"It is capable of memory, it is capable of adapting its behaviour, it is capable of solving problems, of moving around a labyrinth, of optimising solutions, of behaving a little like an animal. So it's a very curious being, a very curious living being," said David.


And it is hard to kill: when exposed to danger it goes into hibernation and dries out.

In this vegetative mode, "it is nigh immortal," blob specialist Audrey Dussutour of France's CNRS research institute told AFP.

But just add a few drops of water, and "voila!" the blob comes to life again, looking to feed and procreate, which it does by producing and releasing spores that grow into new, baby blobs.

phys.org (https://phys.org/news/2019-10-le-blob-paris-zoo-star.html)

Le wow!

BeastOfBologna
18th October 2019, 00:57
chemicals/neurotransmitters are good transportation conduits...What does that thing do with 72 sexes?

Dreamtimer
18th October 2019, 12:20
I haven't found that answer yet. It can form new blobs. What part of it is considered the sex organ? I dunno. :noidea::hmm::scrhd: It can merge thereby diversifying it's genetic portfolio. One thing for sure, it will survive and thrive because with climate change comes the era of slime moulds.

PurpleLama
18th October 2019, 13:20
chemicals/neurotransmitters are good transportation conduits...What does that thing do with 72 sexes?

With all the merging and diverging that goes on in its reproduction, the common sense human idea of sex pretty much goes out the window. The scientific definitions of such as it applies to microbiology is fairly distinct from our mammalian perspective.

Or, with all them -osis's flying around, who the f knows?! Lol

Dreamtimer
19th October 2019, 11:49
Imagine if humans budded and broke off their offspring.

Sounds like a gross sci fi.

RogueEllis
3rd November 2019, 15:09
Can I have one? I promise to feed it, water it and take it on walks. Please Mom? Please Dad?

BeastOfBologna
3rd November 2019, 15:13
Hi Rogue,

I think you're parents are going to consider how you have 'taken care" of your other pets.... :)

RogueEllis
3rd November 2019, 15:21
It was just that one time I swear! I won't let it happen again.

Sorry guys...

:back to topic:

Malisa
4th November 2019, 06:04
Can I have one? I promise to feed it, water it and take it on walks. Please Mom? Please Dad?

But first you have to think very carefully what will happen if/when you flush it down the toilet...

RogueEllis
4th November 2019, 11:58
Just when you thought it was safe to sit on the toilet...

Aragorn
4th November 2019, 14:28
Just when you thought it was safe to sit on the toilet...

They don't think sitting on the toilet would be all that safe over in South Africa. :p They've got a small but very venomous and very aggressive spider there that likes setting up its residence under the toilet seat. ;)

RogueEllis
4th November 2019, 17:30
Oh my. The ol' hovering technique.

Dreamtimer
13th November 2019, 18:37
:lol::lol::lol:

Border Dog
14th November 2019, 14:36
why anyone don't talk about 720 sexes ?

I know a jargon to annoy LGBT activists, that's is applicable here.

" Refuse the Imitations. Sex there are Only Two! " :love:

Cephalopods also have no brains, and are intelligent beings.

Aragorn
14th November 2019, 20:41
Cephalopods also have no brains, and are intelligent beings.

Actually, that's not true ─ at least, the part about them not having any brain. As the matter of fact, they have very large brains in relation to their body mass. Quoting Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cephalopod#Nervous_system_and_behavior)...:





Nervous system and behavior

Cephalopods are widely regarded as the most intelligent of the invertebrates, and have well developed senses and large brains (larger than those of gastropods). The nervous system of cephalopods is the most complex of the invertebrates and their brain-to-body-mass ratio falls between that of endothermic and ectothermic vertebrates. Captive cephalopods have also been known to climb out of their aquaria, maneuver a distance of the lab floor, enter another aquarium to feed on the crabs, and return to their own aquarium.

The brain is protected in a cartilaginous cranium. The giant nerve fibers of the cephalopod mantle have been widely used for many years as experimental material in neurophysiology; their large diameter (due to lack of myelination) makes them relatively easy to study compared with other animals.

Many cephalopods are social creatures; when isolated from their own kind, some species have been observed shoaling with fish.

Some cephalopods are able to fly through the air for distances of up to 50 m. While cephalopods are not particularly aerodynamic, they achieve these impressive ranges by jet-propulsion; water continues to be expelled from the funnel while the organism is in the air. The animals spread their fins and tentacles to form wings and actively control lift force with body posture. One species, Todarodes pacificus, has been observed spreading tentacles in a flat fan shape with a mucus film between the individual tentacles while another, Sepioteuthis sepioidea, has been observed putting the tentacles in a circular arrangement.

Border Dog
15th November 2019, 00:55
Great, I decline my ingenuous precipitation, althought I was aware about the powerful nervous system of Cefalophodes.

To utilize the post, I would like to refers another odd parasite fungus, With No Brain, but with some inteligent behavior that cause a complete invasion of muscle fibers, which cells appeared to be connected to each other, that makes a zombie host obey them. Interestgly, they attack all the body of host, except the Brain.


Zombie ant fungus doesn’t attack ants’ brains. Instead, the fungus invades an ant’s entire body, forming an interconnected 3-D network, forcing the ant to move.

https://en.es-static.us/upl/2011/05/Infected_Thai_zombie_ant_C_leonardi.jpg

source (https://earthsky.org/earth/research-zombie-ant-fungus-doesnt-invade-ants-brains)

Aragorn
15th November 2019, 01:13
Great, I decline my ingenuous precipitation, althought I was aware about the powerful nervous system of Cefalophodes.

To utilize the post, I would like to refers another odd parasite fungus, With No Brain, but with some inteligent behavior that cause a complete invasion of muscle fibers, which cells appeared to be connected to each other, that makes a zombie host obey them. Interestgly, they attack all the body of host, except the Brain.

Zombie ant fungus doesn’t attack ants’ brains. Instead, the fungus invades an ant’s entire body, forming an interconnected 3-D network, forcing the ant to move.[/IMG]

source (https://earthsky.org/earth/research-zombie-ant-fungus-doesnt-invade-ants-brains)

Not just ants. I've seen them do it to larger insects as well. Pretty scary stuff. :shocked: :belief: